Civil War Soldier Obituaries




Obituaries of Civil War Soldiers
Morgan County IL





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ADWELL, John
AGARD, Norman
ALFORD, Frank C.
ATCHISON, Granville
BARLETT, Dr. Aurelius T.
BATES, William J.
BATTY, Edwin
BEATTY, John Argus
BELK, Chamberlain
BISHOP, Virgil
BRADWAY, James
BREWER, Samuel
BRIDGEMAN, Christopher Columbus
BRISENDINE, P. S.
BROWN, Benjamin
BROWN, William Woodford, MD
BURCH, Benjamin H.
BURCH, Francis Marion
BURNETT, Micajah
BURNETT, Moses
BURNS, Harvey M.
CAMM, Bernard
CARR, William Henry ?H
CARTER, Darius
CATLIN, C. A., Capt.
CHAMBERS, James R.
CHANCE, George W
CHAPIN, Q. H.
CHURCH, Benjamin F.
CLARK, William R.
COARD, F. M.
COE, William
COOK, James Marion
CORAY, Silas G.
CORE, A. B.
COX, Augustus
COX, Richard C.
CRISWELL, John M.
CRUMPLER, William
CULLY, Oliver H.
CURVIN, Arthur
DARLEY, Benjamin
DAWSON, Josiah
DENNISON, Samuel Jefferson
DICKINSON, Piercy
DOUGHTERY, John Seborn
DUNCAN, John H.
DUPY, Jerome E.
EDMONDSON, Sandaman
EMERICK, Lycurgus
ENNIS, S. C.
EPLING, Floyd
FISHBACK, Josiah
FOX, George R.
GIVENS, W. T., Jr.
GOLD, Myron
GOLDSMITH, John H.
GRAY, William
GRAY, William M.
GRIERSON, Benjamin H., Gen.
HAIRGROVE, W. J.
HARRIS, James Madison
HARRIS, John B.
HARRIS, William Henry H.
HARRISON, William Columbus
HART, Albert
HART, Thomas Jefferson
HENDERSON, Amos
HENDERSON, John
HERALD, A. B.
HICKMAN, John Thomas
HILLERBY, George
HOBAKER, David
HOCKING, Alfred H.
HODGERSON, Y. M.
HOLMES, George T.
HOPPER, Hassell
HOWE, Daniel W.
HOWELL, Pierson
HUDSON, Frank M.
HUGHES, Blair M.
HURST, James S.
HURT, Charles
HUTCHISON, J. M
JACKSON, Charles
JOHNSON, Lewis
JOLLY, Emmanuel C.
JONES, Benjamin J.
JONES, Elah
JONES, John
JONES, Reuben
JONES, Timothy
JOY, James Madison
KEHOE, Patrick
KENT, Enoch
KEPLINGER, Benjamin Franklin
KEPLINGER, H. P.
LAMBERT, John F.
LAWS, John Perry
LOVING, George W.
LUTTRELL, John West
LUTTRELL, William T.
MAGINN, John C.
MAHER, Patrick
McCASLAND, W. A.
McCORMICK, William D.
MASTERS, James Madison
MAUL, Henry
MEACHAM, Milton Morris
MEACHAM, Willis E.
MERIT, William Henry
MILLION, Elijah F.
MITCHELL, Jabez
MOFFETT, John B.
MOORE, George W.
MOORE, William J.
MUEHLHAUSEN, Henry W.
MURRAY, George
NAGLE, John Frederick
NARR, Henry
NICHOLS, Samuel W.
NICKEL, Charles
NUNNELLY, Joseph A.
OSBORN, William Thomas
OSBORNE, John T.
PARKER, M. V.
PRICE, Louis
RANKIN, James Steven
RANSDELL, John P.
RAY, Felix G.
RAY, William Everment
READ, James Hughey
RICHARDSON, James F.
RICHARDSON, Samuel L.
RING, James M.
ROMANG, Christian
ROHRER, Wilburn G.
RUFUS, Christian
RYNDERS, William
SANDERS, Charles J.
SEYMOUR, John Brudd
SEYMOUR, John P.
SHELBURN, Augustus
SIBERT, W. E.
SMEDLEY, Thomas Braxton
SMITH, Capt. Alexander
SMITH, William P.
SNYDER, Adam W
SNYDER, George W.
SPENCER, Benjamin F.
SPENCER, James
SPENCER, William
SPERRY, Edward
SPERRY, James M.
SPERRY, Luther C.
SPIRES, James Burton
STAGG, James M.
STEWART, John B.
STROISCH, Charles
TIFF, William J.
TIMMONS, W. M.
TODD, Wiley
VAN WINKLE, Alexander
VAN WINKLE, John H.
VIEIRA, Joseph J.
VIOLET, William
WADDELL, Hiram
WALKER, Nicholas R.
WALTON, Jonathan W.
WARD, John Keller
WEMPLE Francis Holland
WHEELER Joseph B
WHITLOCK, Alexander
WHITLOCK, John W.
WINGLER, John
WOOD, John
WOODMANSEE, John Fletcher
WRAY, M. K.
WRIGHT, John W.
WRIGHT, W. C.
WYATT, William J.


ADWELL, John (Click for CEMETERY LISTING)
John Adwell was born in Scioto county, Ohio, Jan. 25, 1840, and died at his home in this city Tuesday, July 11, 1905, aged 65 years, 5 months and 15 days. In 1853 he moved with his parents to Jersey county, Illinois, and from there to Sangamon county in 1856. He enlisted in the services of his country Aug. 21, 1864, at Camp Butler in Company B, 30th Illinois Infantry, and later re-enlisted as a veteran at Vicksburg, Miss., Jan. 1, 1864. On account of wounds received in battle near Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864, he was discharged nov. 11 of the same year. Mr. Adwell was united in marriage to Miss Martha Edwards, June 2,5 1865. To this union were born seventeen children, eleven daughters and six sons. He is survived by his wife, nine daughters and three sons. The following is a list of some of the battles and skirmishes in which he was engaged: Belmont, Mo., capture of Ft. Henry, Tenn., Ft. Donaldson, Seige of Corinth, Britton Lane, capture of Ft. Gibson, Rammon, Jackson, Champion Hill, Big Black, all in Mississippi; first assault on Vicksburg, capture of Bushy Mountain, La., Peach Tree Creek; Liggett Hill; in front at Atlanta and several others. The funeral services were held in the Baptist church, Wednesday, July 12, at 1:30 p.m., Rev. E. K. Masterson officiating. Interment at East cemetery.

AGARD, Norman
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Norman Agard was born September 22, 1844, in Waverly, Ill., and died in Willmette, Ill., January 1, 1911. He was a son of Jonathan G. Agard and Comfort Shumway. His father was among the early settlers of Waverly. He was a loyal soldier of the union army, being a member of the 32nd Reg. Co. A. He leaves a wife and two daughters to mourn his loss. At the time of his death, he was living with his daughter, Mrs. M. H. McMillan of Willmette, a suburb of Chicago. His daughter, Mrs. Trezize lives in Washington D. C. For many years Mr. Agard and wife have lived in Topeka, Kan. It was there something over a year ago, that he was converted and joined the Euclid Ave. M. E. church, the well known Marvin Culpepper being pastor. Among other relatives are an only nephew, Charles Agard, and three nieces. Mrs. Mercilia Vierira, Mrs. Will Sissons, and Mrs. Stephen Kennedy. He leaves many old comrades, among whom is Milton Meacham, a member of the same regiment.


ALFORD, C. Frank  
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C. Frank ALFORD, was born in the state of Georgia, May 8, 1848, and died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. B. S. Roberts, in Girard, Ill., Saturday, April 15, 1922, at the age of 73 years, 11 months and 7 days. At the age of four years he came with his parents to Macoupin County, settling near the town of Palmyra, where he grew to manhood. At the young and tender age of 15 he heard his country call, and enlisted in Co. I, 133 Regiment Illinois Volunteers and served until he was honorably discharged at Nashville, Tenn., May 11th, 1865. Returning to his old hold, he followed his former vocation until December 12, 1869, when he was united in marriage with Sarah M. Conlee, and to this union were born three children: Allie, Anna and William: Allie dying in infancy, Anna, who is the wife of B. S. Roberts, and William F. Alford, still survive. Mr. and Mrs. Alford lived happily together sharing each others joys and sorrows, until August 17, 1914, when the dear wife entered that peaceful rest. Mr. Alford was a man of sterling qualities. He despised hypocrisy in every form. The golden rule was his motto in life, and by living that law he endeared himself in the hearts of those who knew him best, for it can be said of him, his word was as good as his bond. Since the death of his wife, Mr. Alford had lived with his son, Will Alford and family at their home two miles south of Girard, and had enjoyed good health until the early part of February, when he was stricken with a slight stroke of paralysis, and on March 1st was taken to St. John's hospital in Springfield. After three weeks of treatment there he was not improved, and was taken back to his home where he remained until a couple of weeks prior to his death, when he was taken to the home of his daughter, Mrs. B. S. Roberts, in Girard. Besides his son and daughter, he is survived by five grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs. Martha Wood of Stockton, Mo., and Mrs. Thomas Conlee, of Carlinville. Funeral services were held Monday at the Baptist church in Girard, at 12:30 o'clock, in charge of Elder George W. Murray, and the remains brought to Waverly for interment in East Cemetery. (Waverly Journal, Vol. 50, No. 3, dtd. April 21, 1922)


ATCHISON, Granville  
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Granville ATCHISON Dies
Former Waverly Man Dies in Red Oak, Iowa Granville ATCHISON, a former resident of Waverly, who moved to Red Oak, Iowa about twenty-five years ago, died at his home at noon last Saturday, March 31, after an illness of three weeks, being 91 years of age. He was preceded in death by his wife, who died January 4, 1892, and is survived by two daughters, Misses Adella and Dora ATCHISON, of Red Oak. Funeral services were held at the late residence at 3 p.m. Monday, in charge of the Congregational minister. The remains were brought to Waverly Tuesday afternoon via the C. B. & Q., being met by a number of relatives and friends and taken to East cemetery for interment. A short service at the grave was conducted by Rev. S. C. SCHAEFFER, pastor of the local Congregational Church.


BARTLETT, Dr. Aurelius T. -
(Diamond Grove Cemetery, Jacksonville)


DR. A. T. BARTLETT DIED AFTER LONG ILLNESS
_____ Years In Army Service As Surgeon - Prominent for Long Period Among Physicians of State - Funeral Plans Not Complete.
Death came to Dr. Aurelius T. Bartlett Monday night at his home on West College avenue. Dr. Bartlett who ranked in ability with the leading surgeons of the state, had been ill thru a long period and his death was not unexpected
by those who knew him well. He became resident of Jacksonville in 1903 and is survived by his daughter, Mrs. James G. Voseller and one son, Dr. Willard Bartlett of St. Louis, who has a wide reputation as an especially successful St. Louis specialist. Dr. Willard Bartlett has been a frequent visitor in Jacksonville during his father's illness and was here just a few days since but was unable to be present at the final hour because of the critical illness of his youngest son.
Mrs. Bartlett's death occurred in March, 1917.
Born in Maine.
The deceased was born December 4, 1830, at Searsmont, Me. His preparatory education was attained in the common schools of Ohio, supplemented by a course in Temperance Hall academy at Jerseyville, Ill. He taught school
for a time in each of the above named states, and commenced the study of medicine in 1858 at Jerseyville under Joseph O. Hamilton, M.D., attended two courses of lectures at Missouri Medical college and Rush medical college, from the latter of which he was graduated in 1862. He also attended a course of lectures at St. Louis Medical college in 18__ receiving the degree; also took a post-graduate course at the New York Polyclinic in the winter and spring of 1891.
Commissioned Army Surgeon.
April 21, 1862, he was commissioned assistant surgeon in the Missouri State Militia, in the service of the federal army; was promoted to rank of surgeon on May 7, following; was mustered out February 15, 1863;
recommissioned surgeon of the thirty-third Missouri Volunteer Infantry April 15, 1863, and was mustered out of service Aug. 10, 1865, having been reported "present for duty" with regiment every day, altho as senior medical officer in his brigade he frequently did brigade and division work. In October, 1865, Dr. Bartlett located in the private practice of medicine at Virden.
While resident at Virden he was the local surgeon of the J. S. E. road, now part of the Burlington system, and was for several years president of the Macoupin county Medical society. He was a member of the Capital District
Medical society, of the District Medical Society of Central Illinois; of the Illinois Army and Navy Medical Association and of the Illinois State Medical Society; an ex-member of the American Medical Association and of the National Association of Railway Surgeons.
While associated with the 33rd Missouri Infantry, Dr. Bartlett was appointed surgeon in chief of the district of eastern Arkansas and later was made a member of the board of operations for the first division, 16th army corps,
and was actively employed as such in several engagements in the Red River campaign, Louisiana and at the battles of Tupelo, Nashville and Moline besides others of less importance. For a great many years the deceased engaged in
general surgical practice and his reputation extended thru a wide territory. He was the author of a series of valuable articles on surgical topics and in his day appeared upon the programs of various medical societies.
Member of Masons.
While a resident of Virden Dr. Bartlett was a member of Virden lodge A. F. and A. Masons and served as
Worshipful Master of the lodge for six years. He was an elder in the Presbyterian church and for a long time actively identified with the church interests of his home community. After becoming a resident of Jacksonville, he was
associated with State Street Presbyterian church.
Dr. Bartlett's marriage to Miss Sue A. Brown occurred October 23, 1865. As already mentioned Dr. Bartlett had a notable army career, serving as surgeon in thirteen engagements during the war and in nearly all was a member
of the board of operators in the first division of the 16th army corps. Various contributions he made to the army medical museum are on view at Washington, D.C.
Successful in Practice.
After the war Dr. Bartlett was very successful in the practice of his profession and acquired large holdings in the vicinity of Virden. The development of the coal industry in that locality gave added value to his farm properties
and his estate is one of large value. Because of his advanced years during his residency in Jacksonville, Dr. Bartlett has lived a somewhat retired life. His interest, however, in the community was marked and he was actively associated with the affairs of State Street church and in Matt Starr post G. A. R. Altho so successful in business affairs, Dr. Bartlett maintained thru all the years a characteristic modesty and gentleness of spirit. Those who knew him well appreciated the fact that he was a man of trained intellect and broad and generous spirit. In his professional life he kept fully up with the development of medicine and surgery. Following his retirement he did not abandon interest in life and was a close student of affairs. His own recollection of the War of the Rebellion added to his interest in the present world struggle and even during the days of his invalidism he constantly followed the progress of events in Europe and the war preparations at home.
Dr. Bartlett was a Christian gentleman of the fine type that the present day does not seem to develop generously. There was vigorousness and gentleness all thru his life and those who knew him best had the keenest appreciation of the strength and worth of his character and mentality.
The arrangements for the funeral have not yet been completed.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, dtd. 23 July 1918)

BATES, William J. 
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W. J. Bates Drops Dead Down Town
Prominent Citizen Stricken by Heart Failure at Edge's Butcher Shop, Aged Nearly 83 Years. William J. Bates, former businessman, and for many years a prominent and highly respected citizen of Waverly died suddenly Monday morning about 8o'clock. Mr. Bates had come to town for meat and stepped up to the door of Edge's market and given his order. While standing on the sidewalk at the front door waiting for the meat to be wrapped up he fell and expired in a few minutes, having been stricken with heart failure. W. J. Bates, the 6th child of John and Mary Bates, was born in Ohio, May 5, 1837 and died May 3, 1920. Thus if he had lived but two days longer he would have been 83 years old. He came to Illinois at the age of 19. On September 20, 1859 he was married to Louisa Rice of Palmyra, the officiating minister being John H. Austin. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having enlisted in Co. H, 133rd Regiment of Illinois Volunteers. He received an honorable discharge on September 24, 1864. He was for many years a member of the Masonic lodge, having received help from the Masons when a young man, he was enabled to secure a good education in their school at Belfountain, Ohio. After being thus qualified he taught school for many years, but about forty years ago he came to Waverly where he entered the grocery business with J. C. Lankton as partner. On account of his lameness he quit business and has since lived a retired life. He was brightly converted in early manhood, and united with the Methodist Episcopal church, which faith he kept unto the end. He, with his faithful wife and a few others of like faith and practice, were for many years the pillars of the church of which they were members. After the departure, of his faithful companion twelve years ago, he ceased his active work in the church of , but still retained his faith in God and his practice of Christian virtues. He had two brothers who were honored ministers in the Methodist Episcopal church. One, John L. Bates, was a member of a conference in Ohio, and the other, George W. Bates, was a member of the Illinois conference. He leaves of his immediate relatives four children: Mrs. Mary Deatherage, Mrs. Fannie Keplinger, both of Waverly; J. A. Bates of Champaign; and George W. Bates, of Terra Haute, Indiana; also two grandchildren, Miss Vera Bates of Terre Haute, and Kenneth Deatherage. Funeral services were held at the First M. E. church Wednesday, May 5, at 2 p.m. in charge of the pastor, Rev. Francis E. Smith, assisted by Rev. V. G. King, of Palmyra, a life long friend of Mr. Bates. Interment was in East Cemetery. (Friday, May 7, 1920 - Waverly Journal) .

BATTY, Edwin
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Edwin Batty Ends Long, Useful Life
Owner of Waverly's First Lumber Yard and Pioneer Miller Dies at Age of 88 Years. Waverly lost one of its best known and best beloved citizens last week, when Edwin Batty died at the advanced age of 88 years. Mr. Batty was long identified with the business interests of Waverly. He started the first lumber yard in the city, in the year 1872. He was also engaged in the grain business and in 1881-82 joined with his brother, John Batty in the firm of Batty Brothers and built the large brick flour mill which played such an important part in our community's life until its destruction by fire in January 1901. Edwin Batty was born in Littlemore, near Manchester, England, March 30, 1834, and died at his home in this city, Thursday afternoon, October 26, 1922, at the age of 88 years, 6 months and 27 days. Mr. Batty came to America with his parents in the year 1842 arriving at Beardstown, Ill., late in February 1842. From there the family moved to Virginia, Ill., then to New Berlin, Sangamon County. In May 1872 he moved to Waverly, where he has since resided. He was married to Fanny O. Davis, December 28, 1858. To this union were born five children, two of whom preceded him in death, one in infancy, the other in young manhood. He is survived by his widow; three children, John N. Batty and Ella B. Styles of Chicago, and Emma B. Diddle of this city; also one grandson, Edwin B. Styles, of Chicago. In 1860 he was converted and united with the Baptist church of Old Berlin, Ill. In 1872 his membership was transferred to the Waverly Baptist church, of which he remained a faithful member to the end. Mr. Batty was a veteran of the Civil War, belonging to the 106th Illinois Volunteers, Co. A. He was active in the business life of Waverly for many years. Besides his immediate family, he leaves a large number of relatives and friends, who will mourn his departure. Funeral services were held at the residence Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, in charge of Rev. J. W. Allen, pastor of the Baptist church. Interment was in East cemetery.

BEATTY, John Argus 
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CIVIL WAR VETERAN CALLED BY DEATH
John Argus Beatty, son of Francis and Sarah Argus Beatty, was born December 4, 1843, in New York City. When a small boy he came with his parents to Jersey County, Illinois. When fourteen years of age he came to a farm northwest of Virden. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, 122nd Illinois Infantry, at Carlinville, returning home in 1865. He was a member of John W. Ross Post, No. 331, G. A. R. until his death. At an early age he united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and remained a faithful and consistent member the remainder of his life. On February 20, 1868, he was united in marriage to Julia S. Smith. To this union were born seven children, two daughters and five sons. In March following his marriage he moved to a farm east of Macon, Illinois. In 1875 he left the farm, moving to Virden, where he engaged in the meat business. In 1876 he returned to the farm at Macon, and remained there until 1896, when he removed to farm west of Auburn, living there for a time. In 1902 he bought a farm west of Waverly, moving to that place at that time. Owing to the infirmities of old age he retired from the farm in 1922, moving to Waverly in March of that year. He died at the home of his son, Frank Beatty, in this city, Saturday afternoon, September 17, after an illness of only a few days, being 83 years, 9 months and 13 days of age. He was the last of a family of six children. His wife, two daughters and one son preceded him in death. He is survived by four sons, Frank, of Waverly; George and Bert, living on farms near Auburn; and Ralph, of Auburn; also seven grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Funeral services were held at the First Methodist church, Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. A. R. Wassell. Music was furnished by a quartet composed of Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. J. H. Shutt, W. L. Carter and R. B. Smedley, who sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought", "Lead Kindly Light" and "City Foursquare." The pall bearers were Arthur Drury, J. M. Stockdale, Roy Crouse, C. F. Wemple, R. McConnell and George Alderson. The flowers were cared for by the grandchildren, Mr. and Mrs. Fletcher Lankton, Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Colbert, Misses Flora and Julia Louise Beatty, and Charles and Kenneth Beatty. Members of the local G. A. R. and the American Legion attended the services in a body. Interment was in East Cemetery. (Vol. 55, No. 26, Waverly Journal, dtd. 23 Sept 1927)

BELK, Chamberlain 
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CHAMBERLAIN BELK DIES AT HOME OF DAUGHTER
Chamberlain Belk, veteran of the civil war, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. James M. Woods, on Tuesday evening, aged 81 years, 11 months and 12 days. He had been in failing health for more than a year.
The deceased was born in Tennessee, June 4, 1840, and saw service in the war to preserve the union in Companies B and M, Thirteenth Illinois Calvary.
After receiving his honorable discharge he returned to this community and was united in marriage with Elizabeth Whitlock who died Feb. 8, 1912. Six children survive: John and Mack Belk, of Carlinville, Charles, of Jacksonville, Mrs. Laura Deatherage, of Waverly, and Mrs. Daisy Woods and George Belk, of Franklin. In the last years of life he resided with his daughter, Mrs. Woods, who with her husband gave him
loving care.
Funeral services will be conducted from the Woods residence this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, in charge of Rev. J. E. Teaney, of Atwater. Interment will be made in the village cemetery.
(May 18, 1922)

BISHOP, Virgil 
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CIVIL WAR VETERAN PASSES AWAY
Virgil Bishop Succumbs to Heart Attack at Age of 79 Years.
Virgil Bishop, well known citizen of Waverly, and veteran of the Civil War, died suddenly Saturday afternoon, death being due to an attack of heart trouble. Mr. Bishop had been in ill health for some time and had not been down town for about a week, but was able to be up and about the house. He was stricken while sitting on the couch and died before he could reach the bed.
Virgil Bishop, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Bishop, was born at Mt. Vernon, Indiana, July 30, 1844. He passed quietly from this life, at his home in this city at 2 p.m. Saturday, March 15, 1924, aged 79 years, 7 months and 15 days.
When but a small boy, Mr. Bishop joined the Miller Baptist church, near Mt. Vernon, and remained a faithful follower of the Master until his death. He became a member of the Waverly Baptist church, October 30, 1902. Whenever his health permitted he was always to be found in his place on the Sabbath day, and maintained an active interest in the affairs of the church.
Mr. Bishop enlisted in the Union army during the Civil war, and served his country for three years, until honorably discharged.
On December 10, 1883, he was united in marriage to Nancy Meyers, who preceded him in death.
Later, he was united in marriage to Nancy Wallace, who lived bu three months after their marriage. On February 13, 1902, he married Mrs. Mary Hillyard, who survives him.
Mr. Bishop was the last living member of a family of six children. Besides his wife, he leaves to mourn their loss, one adopted daughter, Mrs. Ralph Edge of Auburn, two nephews and seven nieces.
Funeral services were held at the Baptist church, Monday afternoon, March 17, at 2 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. H. S. Lucas, assisted by Rev. J. E. Curry. A quartet composed of Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. J. H.
Shutt, Rev. H. S. Lucas and W. R. Turnbull furnished the music. The pall bearers were W. A. Barrow, Ed Rhea, Samuel Rodgers, Wm. Schreiber, Chas. Newberry and Daniel Hale. Three nieces of the deceased, from Virden, cared for the flowers. Interment was in East Cemetery.

BRADWAY, James  
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ANOTHER OLD SETTLER GONE
Uncle James Bradway Is the next to Go
James Bradway, oldest child of Mr. and Mrs. Lester Bradway, was born near Batavia village, Geneesee county, New York, March 29th, 1827, and died at the residence of his son, Jas. Bradway, in Waverly, Ill., Dec. 22d, 1900, aged 73 years 8 months and 27 days. When he was only ten years of age he moved with his parents to Erie county, Penn, remaining with them until 1847, when he came alone to Illinois and located in Ogle county; he remained here only a few years and in 1850 he removed to Menard county, and in 1851 to the vicinity of Jacksonville in Morgan county; in March, 1873, he came with his family to Waverly where he resided until 1890 when he went to Palmyra where he resided until his death. On the 13th of February, 1851, he was united in marriage to Miss Olive S. York who still survives him; this union was blessed with eight children, four of whom Joseph L., of Raymond, Ill., James of Waverly, Ill., and Albert L. of Palmyra, Ill., together with seven grandchildren survive him. In August, 1863, he enlisted in Co. K, 101st Illinois volunteer infantry, and was mustered out at Washington, D.C., in April, 1865, at the close of war. He was converted to Christ in the winter of 1874 and united with the Baptist church in this city January 1st, 1875 under the ministry of Rev. M. C. Clark and transferred his membership to the Baptist church at Palmyra when he removed to that place in October, 1890. Deceased lived a very consistent Christian life and was always recognized as one of the most unselfish of men, ever regarding the welfare of others, especially his family, as paramount to his own. He was also a man of very wide acquaintance and was very favorably known among his large circle of friends and acquaintances as "Uncle Jim", and well did he deserve the title of honor. During his days of health he was a man of activity and was always employed at some kind of work until a few years ago when his health began to fail and he was compelled to give it up, since that time he has borne this sickness with great patience and was never heard to murmur or complain. His funeral services were conducted from the Baptist church at Waverly, Sunday, Dec. 23, by W. M. Rhoades, of Upper Alton, and interment was made in East Cemetery. The many floral offerings from the Baptist Aid Society, Young Peoples' Union and W.C.T.U., of Waverly, the church at Palmyra and other friends of the family were very appropriate and beautiful. The pall bearers were Messrs. J. H. Shutt, S. J. Rodgers, H. E. Ensley, C. O. Swift, A. D. Batty and C. A. Wells.

BREWER, Samuel

SAMUEL BREWER OF CHAPIN IS TAKEN BY DEATH
Aged Civil War Veteran Passes Away Last Night After Long Illness.
Samuel George Brewer, a veteran of the Civil War, and a resident of Morgan county since childhood, passed away last night at the family home in Chapin. He had been in failing health for many months.
Mr. Brewer farmed near Chapin for a long period of years, and then moved into the town.
He was born March 27, 1844 in Salesburg, N. C., and came to Illinois with his parents, George W., and Elizabeth Brewer, when he was seven years of age. He enlisted in Company H, 137th Illinois Infantry, and served during the war. He was united in marriage with Hulda Davis Feb. 7, 1870.
Surviving are the widow, six sons and three daughters. One son and one daughter preceded him in death.
Funeral arrangements had not been completed this afternoon.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 30 Sept 1927)

BRIDGEMAN, Christopher Columbus
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C.C. BRIDGEMAN DIED THURSDAY MORNING
Well Known Chapin Resident Passed Away - Was Native of Tennessee - Funeral Saturday Morning.
Chapin, Dec. 19 - Christopher Columbus Bridgman a well known resident of Chapin, died at his home here this morning at 8:30 o'clock.
Deceased was born in Granger county, east Tennessee, December 20, 1839, lacing one day of being 79 years old.
When he was 18 years of age his parents came to Morgan county where he has since resided.
He was united in marriage in 1852 to Miss Emma Gledhill. To this union was born seven children who all survive.
They are Mrs. T. R. Biggers of Crystal City, Texas; Robert Bridgeman of Chapin, Mrs. T. J. Clements of New London, Iowa, Mrs. Belle Knopp and Horace Bridge of Chapin, Mrs. Charles Craig of Kansas City, and Mrs. R. H. Ham of Chapin.
His first wife died in 1883 and he was again married in 1885 to Mrs. Elizabeth Wolford of Chapin.
He leaves the following brothers and sisters: William Bridgman of Decatur, Mrs. Amanda Williams of Chapin, Henry Bridgman of Moweaqua, Mrs. Alonzo Guthridge of Farmer City, Mrs. Alex Patterson of Jacksonville, Mrs. Laura White of Woodson and John Bridgman of Jacksonville. One sister, Alice, preceded him in death.
Mr. Bridgman was a faithful member of the Chapin, M. P. church. He took an active interest in the work of the church and was always a regular attendant at services when health permitted. He was a man of strict honesty and integrity and one who commanded the respect of the entire community in which he lived.
Funeral services will be held at Chapin M. P. church at 10 o'clock Saturday morning, burial in Ebenezer cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, dtd 20 Dec 1918)

BRISENDINE, P. S.
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DEATH SUMMONS AN OLD SOLDIER
P.S. Brisendine, for Nearly Half a Century a Resident of Murrayville Passes Away - Was Member of 101st Illinois Infantry.
P. S. Brisendine, a veteran of the Civil War and a long time resident of Murrayville, died Friday night at 9 o'clock at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. W. Warcup, five miles east of Winchester, at the age of 79 years. For some time Mr. Brisendine had not been in good health and for the past few days had been far from a well man. Within the last few hours of life his condition became serious and death was not altogether unexpected.In a great many ways Mr. Brisendine was a wonderful man. He was of a quiet and retiring disposition yet withall could enjoy a good joke as well as anyone. Little did he dream that the hills and valleys of North Carolina, where he roamed as a boy would find him in later years carrying a musket in defense of his country. For three years Mr. Brisendine, a braver soldier never went to battle. He believed in every principle of the cause of the north and never shirked his duty in any instance. After his return from the war he still maintained that same integrity forthe right and how well the word "honesty' applied to his character. He was also a man of strong convictions religiously. For years he was
superintendent of the Sunday school of the old Methodist church that stood at the Bethel cemetery near Murrayville and when the present edifice was built at Murrayville he also remained superintendent. He was a member of the Masonic lodge, No. 432, of Murrayville and of Walton Post G. A. R. of Murrayville.
Mr. Brisendine was born in North Carolina, Nov. 25, 1832, and came to Illinois with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Abner Brisendine when a young man and settled at Little York. Since 1866 he had been a resident of Murrayville. He was married twice, his first wife being Miss Carpenter of Franklin. This marriage took place Nov. 25, 1852, and to this union six children were born, William, Louis and Belle having died. Those living are Mrs. C. W. Kitner of Murrayville and Mrs. C. B. Warcup of Larimore, North Dakota. Mrs. Brisendine died Feb. 7, 1872. On August 17, 1872, he married Miss Melinda Jane Massey of Franklin and to this union four children were born, Mrs. Minnie Warcup of near Winchester, where Mr. Brisendine had been making his home for the past year and Manona Brisendine of Jacksonville. Two children preceded in death, Edith and Ora. The wife died in June, 1901.
His War Record.
When the civil war broke out Mr. Brisendine enlisted in Company H, 101 Illinois Infantry, at Franklin, Ill. This was the same infantry that R. L. Wyatt of Murrayville joined and for nearly the entire time these two men fought side by side. The company first camped at Jacksonville and then proceeded to Cairo. From here they went to Union City, Tenn., and thence to Bridgeport, Ala. Here Mr. Brisendine joined the forces under General Rosencran and they stayed inBridgeport until 1863. It was from this point that he came under the command of General Sherman and participated in the famous "March to the Sea." After they had reached Savannah the company went to Goldsboro, N. C., and later to Rawlings.
It was while the company was at Rawlings that news of Lee's surrender was heard and so Mr. Brisendine's company was ordered to Wash-ington where it participated in the Grand Review, which was one of the greatest events of its kind in history. Mr. Brisendine, during his military career, was a member of one of the four companies that were dispatched from Holly Springs, Miss., to Vicksburg. The companies were put on gunboats and sent to the assistance of that important post. The taking of this fort was considered by many as being one of the turning points of the Civil War. Among the battles mr. Brisendine participated in were those at Resaca, Ga., Dallas, Ga., New Hope Church, Ga., Peach Tree Creek, Ga.
The last engagement was the stubborn fought contest at Bentenville, N. C. Mr. Brisendine has related some wonderful stories of war times and told them in such a manner as to interest and instruct.
Funeral arrangements will be announced later.(Jacksonville Daily Journal, dated October 28, 1911
Burial was in Bethel Cemetery, Morgan County, Illinois)

BROWN, Benjamin
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Benjamin Brown was born in Wabash Co., Ill., February 13, 1841 and died in Jacksonville, Ill., December 9, 1918. Had he lived until his next birthday in February he would have been 78 years old. When a lad of about ten he came to Waverly, Illinois, from the southeastern part of the state. They walked most of the way driving some stock and as a boy he was so very much worn out with the trip that it made an impression upon him to such an extent that he often mentioned it when an old man. The remainder of his life was spent in the vicinity of Waverly. He was married to Nancy Sherman August 21, 1862. To this union five children were born of whom two are living Mrs. Frank Adcock of Waverly, and Mrs. Fannie Girard of Jacksonville. He again married in 1885, the second marriage was to Rebecca Vancil. To this union two children were born, both of whom were boys and both died on the same night. He was converted in a revival meeting in the earlier days and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church in which church he remained a faithful member until his decease. Funeral services were held at East Cemetery Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. F. E. Smith.

BROWN, William Woodford, MD  
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Funeral of W. W. Brown
That Waverly and Morgan county have lost one of the most popular men in their midst, was attested on Thursday by the immense concourse of people which gathered at the Congregational church at Waverly to attend the funeral services over the remains of W. W. Brown. People were not there out of curiosity, for the many moist eyes in the great crowd bespoke the feeling that a good man had gone. Rich and poor alike showed their regard for the deceased by their presence, and the large number present from Jacksonville, Franklin and other points was remarked upon. The deceased was an attendant upon the Episcopalian church, but the church not being completed, the services were held in the Congregational church at 4:30. The casket was carried into the church by the pall bearers, Jas. E. Hutchison, Wm. A. Hutchinson, Robert Smith, J. M. Joy, F. A. Christopher and W. J. Arnold. Rev. Mr. Fairbank, assisted by Rev. Mr. Chittenden, of Carlinville, conducted the services in an impressive manner. A quartet composed of Rev. Fairbank, Rev. Chittenden and Miss Tanner and Miss Marian Curtis, sang several selections, one especially noticeable being "Art Thou Weary," in which the beautiful voices of Miss Tanner and Miss Curtis moved all present by their exquisite harmony. Rev. Chittenden made a few remarks upon the uncertainty of life - the certainty of death. That we are inclined to postpone action upon preparation for the other life on account of business matters. That death was the great mystery, and that the greatest, grandest minds in all ages had been endeavoring to solve the mystery. Lessons are given us every day of life's uncertainty. We have today such a warning in the death of Mr. Brown. The speaker paid a glowing tribute to the business ability, the character and the life of the deceased. He urged all present to prepare for death while there was yet an opportunity. Rev. Fairbank, in a few plan, but earnest words, spoke consolation to the family, the relatives and the friends present. He cited the large concourse of people as a proof of the popularity of Mr. Brown, and that he had many friends. He pointed to the many expressions of sympathy he had heard on all sides as an index of the feeling of the friends of the deceased. He was beloved of all, and will be greatly missed. He urged his hearers to have faith in God. We may not see the reason now for the seeming untimely removal of our deceased brother, for there are tears in our eyes, the clouds are hanging over us and the waves are about us, but let us trust Him for He doeth all things well. After another hymn the friends were given an opportunity to view the remains, and hundreds of sorrowing friends came forward to take a last look at the face of W. W. Brown. The remains were then taken to the cemetery and laid to rest, and all that loving friends could do was at an end. He was a good husband and father, and upright citizen, a friend to all, universally beloved. Peace to his ashes. (May 17, 1889)
(From the cemetery records: Dr. William Woodford Brown was born 26 Mar 1839 @ Waverly, IL and died on 14 May 1889 @ Jacksonville, IL. He was a son of Isaac Hayden Brown & Mary Woodford Brown. He married (1) to Laura Curtiss on 11 June 1868 @ Morgan County, IL , Book C, Page 45, License 1838; and (2) Mary Clark Hopson on 2 Aug 1877 @ Morgan County, IL, Book C, Page 112, License 1124. He was a Private in Co. I, 10th Illinois Infantry during the Civil War. Records show he had two children by his second wife - Cornelia who died on 6 Mar 1881 and Rev. Edward T. Brown. He is buried in Waverly East Cemetery, Waverly, IL)

BURCH, Benjamin H.  
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Benjamin H. Burch, died Saturday morning at 11:30 o'clock at the family home 2 miles southeast of Franklin, aged 78 years. Mr. Burch had been out to the field, where his son Howard was plowing. He returned to the home and complained of being tired. He laid down on the lounge and his daughter administered to his wants and went about her household duties, in about 20 minutes her little daughter said that she believed grandpa was dead, which proved to be true. Mr. Burch had resided on the old homestead for 40 years and he was known as a man of upright life and character. At the breaking out of the Civil War he enlisted in the Union Army and for six months was confined in Andersonville prison. Coroner Skinner held an inquest over the remains Saturday afternoon, with the following jury: Lee Caldwell, foreman; E.R. Criswell, clerk; Finas Seymour, James Kennedy, Simpson VanWinkle and A.A. Hart. They gave a verdict of death from heart failure by over exertion. He is survived by the following children: Mrs. Porter Turner, Mrs. Robert Jones of Modesto, Mrs. William Hughes, Ellsworth and Harry of Waverly; Mrs. Eula Skeens of Franklin and Howard at home. The funeral service will be conducted Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Methodist church in charge of Rev. J.C. Bell, the pastor. Mr. Burch belonged to the Masons and the Odd Fellows. The former will participate in the services at the church and later at the cemetery. The bearers will be H. G. Keplinger, Albert Whitlock, John W. Luttrell, John Criswell, Holland Wemple and Robert Givens.


BURCH, Francis Marion
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Francis Marion Burch was born in Franklin, Ill., June 20th, 1828, and died in St. Louis, Sept. 18th, 1903, being 74 years 2 months and 28 days of age. About the year 1851 he was converted and united with the M. |E. Church at Franklin, lived a faithful and devoted member for about 25 years when he united with the Presbyterian church at Long Point where he held membership until about 1880 when that body disorganized. Afterwards reunited with the M. E. church at Franklin where he remained until the time of his death. During all these years, whether in times of prosperity or adversity, his faith never wavered, and when the final struggle came he was perfectly resigned to his fate. His entire life has been spent either in or near Franklin and has been worthy of example in good works and faithful christian duty. He enlisted in Company A of the 32nd Illinois regiment and served his country for more than three years. He was stricken with paralysis in May but partially recovered. He suffered a second stroke September 15th, after which he was unable to speak. The subject of this sketch leaves three brothers, Henry, of St. Louis, James, of Oklahoma Territory and Benjamin, of Franklin, and two sisters, Mrs. Drusa Deatherage, of Waverly and Mrs. Martha Pryor, of Weir, Kansas, besides many other relatives and a legion of friends. The funeral services were held at the first M. E. church at Franklin, Ill., and were conducted by the Rev. R. P. Droke, of this city (an old comrade of Mr. Burch's). His text was "If a man dies shall he live again?" Interment in Franklin cemetery. (Sept. 25, 1903)

BURNETT, Micajah
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Micajah Burnett was born two and one half miles north and east of Franklin, December 2, 1841, and died at 7:10 a.m. on June 21, 1915 at his home in this city. With the exception of the three years and three months spent in the army service, his entire life has been lived in Morgan and Sangamon counties. He was the son of Isham and Cynda Burnett, who came from Kentucky in the spring of 1831 and settled northeast of Franklin, where they lived the remainder of their lives. There was born to them a family of ten children, eight boys and two girls, all but two were born at the old homestead in Illinois, James and Ranson, the two sons, having been born in Kentucky. There are now only two surviving members of this family, George and Joseph. George, the older, is now in his eighty fourth year and Joseph will be seventy seven in July. Of the eight deceased children, six of them were laid to rest in Franklin, Richard in California, and Chattie in Oswego, Kansas. Mr. Burnett was married October 20, 1864, and last fall Mr. and Mrs. Burnett celebrated their fiftieth anniversary. To this union six children were born, two of whom, Ida and Clellia are deceased, and those who survive are Sheridan, Felix, Edith and Chattie; also twelve grandchildren. Mr. Burnett at the outbreak of the Civil war went to Jacksonville, where he enlisted into the service of the Union as a volunteer in Company I 14th Illinois Infantry, where he served for three years, and again re-enlisted and served for a term of three months. Escaping the wounds of bayonets and bullets, but bearing the effects of the hardships that befell the lot of the many youths who saw active service as he did. Only those of the 14th that survive could testify to these facts as they really experienced them. While Mr. Burnett was not an active worker and did not take part in church work, at heart he was a christian believer and honored all christian people. During revival services held in Franklin by Rev. Robt. Clark in the year 1867, Mr. Burnett gave his heart to God and became, with his wife, a member of the M.E. church of this city. Mr. Burnett's health has been poor for a number of years, he grew worse last December and for months his life was despaired of. He grew stronger for a while but some ten days ago took to his bed again where he has suffered to the end. The funeral services were held at the late residence Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock, Rev. Sidney M. Bedford, pastor of the Christian church officiating. Interment was in Franklin cemetery. (Waverly Journal, June 25, 1915)


BURNETT, Moses
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Moses Burnett, one of Morgan county's oldest and most respected citizens, died at his home in the College Corner neighborhood, west of this city last Tuesday evening about 8 o'clock, after a lingering illnessof several years duration, at the advanced age of 71 years. He was a veteran of the civil war, and widely known throughout this section, having until his health failed him, dealt quite extensively in the stock business. Mr. Burnett is survived by a wife, six sons and four daughters; Leslie, Russell, Melton of Chicago; Lena and Lee of Franklin; Mrs. Lula Cook of Murrayville; and the Misses Nellie and Mabel and Ralph, residing at home; three brothers, George Burnett of Waverly; Mack Burnett of Springfield, and Joseph Burnett of California.
BURNETT
The funeral services of Moses Burnett were held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the Franklin M.E... church in charge of Rev. A. H. Flagge. Appropriate music was furnished by the church choir and a duet, "One Sweetly Solemn Thought," was sung by Mrs. Anderson and Mrs. Flagge. A large number of floral offerings, including designs from various parts of the country were kindly cared for by Misses Emma and Olive Burnett and Mrs. C. F. Gray and daughter, Lucy, of this city. Interment was made in the Franklin cemetery, where a short prayer was offered by Rev. A. H. Flagge. The bearers were the six sons of the deceased, as follows: C. L., Edward, Lee, Albert, Russell, Ralph and Milton Burnett, with the following honorary bearers: H. G. Keplinger, C. M. Hockings, A. W. Wright, Alec Whitlock, W. O. Benson and Col. W. J. Wyatt.


BURNS, Harvey M.   (Click for CEMETERY LISTING)

Harvey M. Burns Called By Death.
Well Known Resident, Last of Local Veterans of Confederate Army, Died at Age of 82. Harvey Merriman Burns, second child of William and Martha Burns, was born near Atlanta, Ga., February 15, 1845, and departed this life at his home in Waverly, Sunday, December 18, 1927, at the age of 82 years, 10 months and 3 days. In early infancy his parents moved to Spartanburg, South Carolina, where he spent his boyhood. When the Civil war came on, he enlisted in the 2nd South Carolina cavalry at the age of seventeen, and remained in the service until the close of the war, having served sixteen months, enduring many hardships and having participated in many battles. At the close of the war he decided to come north. Having no other means, he walked, leaving March 22, 1868, and arriving in Morgan County, Illinois, May 2nd, where he decided to locate, and where he worked for the farmers by the month. On January 25, 1872, he married Mary E. Hart, and to this union five children were born. In 1880 they established a home three miles east of Waverly, where they resided until 1901, when they moved to Waverly. In early life Mr. Burns united with the Methodist church, and was a man who could be depended on to uphold the principles of right living. Those who enjoyed his friendship found it ti be a loyal and sincere one. He was devoted to his family, but their loss is his gain. He is survived by his wife; his five children, Thomas Walker, of Virden; Myrtle Belle and Melcina Alice, at home; Albert Newton, of Waverly; and Aza B. Wemple, of Peoria; also five grandsons, Dr. Robert Burns of Virden, Harold Burns of Springfield, Allen Burns of Waverly, Warren and John Wemple of Peoria; besides two sisters, Mrs. William Timmons of Waverly, and Mrs. Julia Johnson of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and numerous other relatives and friends. Funeral services were held at the residence Tuesday afternoon, December 20, at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. R. N. Montague, of the First M. E. church. Music was furnished by a quartet composed of Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. J. H. Shutt, W. L. Carter and R. B. Smedley, who sang "Rock of Ages", "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere" and "The Day is Over." The pall bearers were Otis Timmons, James Burns, L. T. Seales, C. F. Wemple, George Alderson and John Rodgers. Interment was in East cemetery. (December 23, 1927)

CAMM, Bernard

Bernard Camm, aged 66 years, a veteran of the civil war and a substantial farmer residing east of Pisgah, died Saturday evening of pneumonia.
Decedent was born in Sheffield, England, and came to this country with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam'l Camm, when 2 years of age. He resided near Jacksonville at the out-break of the civil war and was a non-commissioned officer in Company D, 101st Ill. Vol., where he served with honorable distinction.
In 1869 he was married to Miss Mary Filkin, who survives. Three children also survive: Oliver R., Samuel and Mrs. Edgar Curry, all of the county.
One brother, William Camm, residing in Hazen, Ark., and three sisters, Mrs. James Davenport and Mrs. Ivan Wood, of this county, and Mrs. B. Tankersley, of Kansas City, Mo., also survive.
Shortly after the war Mr. Camm settled on a farm at Rantool, Champaign county, where he resided until nine years ago, when he removed to Morgan county,. He was a successful man in every way and leaves behind him a precious memory.
The funeral will be held Monday morning at 11 o'clock at the Union Baptist Church, with interment in Diamond Grove cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal)
Jacksonville, Illinois
April 2, 1905

CARR, William Henry
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Civil War Veteran Answers Summons
William Henry H. Carr, was born six miles north of Dandridge, Jefferson Co., Tenn. He came to Illinois with his parents in October 1859, locating within less than one half mile west of the present home.
In 1862 they moved six miles west of Nilwood.
Often the family went to the home of a neighbor, where good Christian people resided, and on May 18, 1862, he professed faith in Christ.
When the call came in 1862 for 200,000 soldiers, he enlisted, being mustered in September 5th, serving 3 months and 25 days in Company E, 122nd Infantry.
After returning home he was married, on August 5, 1864 to Sophronia Ann McGlothlin. To this union eleven children were born, seven preceding him in death. One daughter, Mrs. Hiler, preceded him just eleven weeks and two days.
He passed away Sunday morning, February 2, 1919, aged 76 years 4 months and 16 days.
He is survived by his wife, one stepson Van B. Carr, of Griffithsville, Ark.; two sons, Elmer and Ira, at home; two daughters, Mrs. Edgar Butler of Nilwood, and Ida, at home; seven grandchildren and one great grandchild; also one brother, Alec Carr, of El Dorado, Kansas.
He united with the Baptist church here about thirty-eight years ago, and when health permitted was a regular attendant.
Funeral services were held at 1 o'clock Wednesday morning, in the Baptist church, conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. J. Campbell. Interment was in East Cemetery.


CARTER, Darius  
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SON OF PIONEER DIES IN IOWA
Civil War Veteran, Son of Waverly Pioneer, Dies at Age of 91.
Darius Carter, for many years a resident of this community, died Monday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. E. Stollard, of Osceola, Iowa. He was 91 years, 6 months and 8 days of age, having been born on June 6, 1845. He was the son of the late Platt Carter who came to Waverly from Connecticut in November, 1836.
After residing here two years, his father bought a farm about three-quarters of a mile from Auburn. It was there that the son, Darius, was born.
When about twelve years of age, Darius moved with his parents to farm about two miles north of Waverly where he grew to manhoof. He enlisted in the Union Army and served in the Civil War commencing May 2, 1864, being enrolled in Company C, 144th Illinois Volunteer Infantry. His war activities included pursuit of bushwackers in Missouri and Arkansas. Later he was assigned to guard prisoners at Alton. He was a member of Stephenson Post of the G. A. R., of Springfield.
On April 29, 1873, Mr. Carter was married to Miss Sarah Poor, of Waverly. To this union four children were born, Fred, Bertha, Avis and Chester. His wife, one daughter, Mrs. Bertha Gutzweiller, and one son, Chester, preceded him in death. Mr. Carter and family resided for many years on the farm now occupied by Henry Brown and family, about a mile and a half north of town. During his residence there Mr. Carter served as road commissioner of Loami township, before the township was divided to form Maxwell township.
In 1896 Mr. Carter moved to Springfield where he resided many years. For the past few years he has made his home with his daughter in Iowa.
Besides his son Fred and daughter, Mrs. Stollard, he is survived by three grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. Mrs. Chas. C. Woods, of the north side, is a niece of the deceased.
Funeral services were held at the Swift Funeral home in this city yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock,
Rev. Hudson H. Pittman, pastor of First Congregational church of Springfield officiating.
Charles Fetzer, of Springfield, sang "Lead, Kindly Light", and "Face to Face", the accompanist being Robert Carter of Springfield.
The pall bearers were F. H. Curtiss, A. V. Spaenhower, George Romang, C. C. Woods, Robert E. Coe, and Orrin McCormick
Burial was in East cemetery. (18 Dec 1936)

CATLIN, Capt. C. A.

Sudden Death of C. A. Catlin
Stricken While Recovering From Operation in New York Hospital - Prominent as a Citizen and Soldier - News was a Great Shock to Community
The community was greatly shocked Saturday, when the sad news was received of the death of Capt. C. A. Catlin, of this city, who died at Dr. Bull's hospital in New York Saturday morning. Mr. Catlin underwent a major operation a week ago and was convalescing in a satisfactory manner. His wife received a letter Saturday morning written by Mr. Catlin Thursday and expressing his own satisfaction over his condition. His ultimate recovery was regarded as only a question of time. He was able to sit in a chair Saturday and was talking to his physician in his room in the hospital when death struck him and in a moment he ceased to breathe. Death was pronounced due to embolus, or a clogging of a blood vessel.
In the death of Captain Catlin, Jacksonville has sustained a distinct loss and a wide circle of admiring friends will miss the cordial greetings that emanated from a disposition that was all sunshine and pleasantness. Honorable in his dealings, just in his judgments, genial in manner, Captain Catlin was a man who won friends and kept them.
As a citizen and as a soldier he never wavered in the call of duty and he has answered the summons of the silent messenger, leaving behind him a memory that will be revered.. In his family he was always peculiarly happy and his home was ever a place of cheerfulness and comfort.
Charles Augustus Catlin was born in Hancock county, Illinois, March 23, 1839 and was the son of Joel and Calista (Hawley) Catlin. His father was a native of Connecticut and laid out and founded the town of Augusta, Ill. Mr. Catlin received his education in this city, where his parents had previously resided, between the years 1832 and 1836, and graduated from the high school at that time conducted by Newton Bateman. Soon after graduation he entered the employ of Robert Hockenhull where he learned the drug business and was in the employ of the former when the civil war began. He answered the call of his country and enlisted in the union army Sept. 2, 1862 having assisted in the organization of Company C, 101st Ill. Vol. Of which company he was elected first lieutenant. His regiment was sent to Cairo, Ill., where his company did provost duty, and later it was sent to Davis Mill, Tenn.
He participated in the campaign against Vicksburg and was present at the fall of that stronghold. Previous to that time he was ordered to Memphis, where he was assigned to duty as judge advocate of a court of inquiry. In the spring of 1863 he became assistant provost marshal to the army of Tennessee, with headquarters at Yazoo Landing.
After the fall of Vicksburg he was stationed in that city and had charge of the paroling of the prisoners which followed the capitulation. He was promoted to a captaincy in April, 1863, and participated in the battles of Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and the relief of Burnside at Knoxville that succeeded in driving Longstreet out of Tennessee. In the spring of 1864, upon receipt of news of the death of his brother, he tendered his resignation after a loyal service in the defense of the imperiled union.
After leaving the army he located in Pekin, Ill., and there engaged in the drug business. In 1869 he came to Jacksonville to become agent for the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance company of Milwaukee. Since that period he had continued in the service of that company and at the time of his death was district agent for Jacksonville and vicinity, with offices in the Scott block. He was the oldest representative of the company, in point of years of service. Captain Catlin ever took an interest in Grand Army circles and at the time of his death was commander of Matt Starr Post of this city. He was also prominent in fraternal circles and was a Mason of high standing. He was a member of Jacksonville Lodge No. 570, A. F. and A. Masons, Jacksonville Chapter No. 3, R. A. M. Jacksonville Council No. 5, R. & S. M. Hospitaler Commandery No. 31, Knights Templar, and of the Mystic Shrine Temple and the Consistory at Peoria, having been a thirty-second degree Mason.
In the summer of 1863 Captain Catlin was granted a leave of absence from the Army that he might keep his engagement to marry, Aug. 26, 1863, at Norristown, Pa., he was married to Miss Carrie Twining. To this union were born four children; Harry, who died in infancy, Carrie Augusta, who died in 1892, Donald Cameron, of New York city and Frank Hawley, of New Orleans. His wife died in 1892.
In 1896 Mr. Catlin was married to Mrs. Helen Baxter, of Griggsville, who died six weeks later. His third marriage took place March 8, 1900, when he was married to Mrs. Roxanna Goltra Towne, of this city, who survives.
The remains are expected to arrive here Monday morning, accompanied by Donald C. Catlin. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

CHAMBERS, James R.
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James R. Chambers died Tuesday night at 10 o'clock having succumbed to a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Chambers who had not been in good health the last few years, had failed rapidly this winter, and about 6:30 last Sunday morning was stricken with paralysis. He never regained consciousness after this attack, but seemed to suffer greatly until death released him Tuesday night.
James Robert Chambers was born in St. Clair county Illinois, December 25, 1830. He was the son of Rev. William and Sarah McReynolds Chambers. He moved with his parents to Waverly, while a boy, where he resided until 1853, when he went to California, going with a drove of cattle, the trip consuming six months time. He remained in California until the outbreak of the Civil War, enlisting at Stockton in Co. I, 1st California cavalry, in 1863. He served three years until 1866; the California troops in the war being mostly used in protecting the union forces from Indians. At the close of the war he was mustered out at San Francisco, and going to New York by way of the isthmus of Panama he returned to Waverly, where he has since resided.
Mr. Chambers was married Oct. 5, 1869 to Miss Mary Woods. Mr. and Mrs. Chambers have spent a long and very happy married life together. In their home life, Mr. Chambers showed himself a loving husband, a great lover of home, and a man of kindheartedness both in his home and relations to his fellowmen. Mr. Chambers led a Christian life, having been converted and joined the M. E. church when about 50 years of age. He was a cabinet maker by trade, but after the war became a farmer, the first twelve years of his married life being spent on the farm. Since that time he has resided in Waverly, having followed the carpenter's trade until failing health made an active life no longer possible.
Mr. Chambers is survived by his wife; one sister, Mrs. Sarah Woodward of Urbana; and three half brothers in the west.
Funeral services were held in the First M. E. church Thursday morning at 11 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. A. N. Simmons. Interment was in East Cemetery.
(The Waverly Journal, February 9, 1912, Vol. 39, No. 43)

CHANCE, George W.  
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Died at his home in this city Thursday, Nov. 5, at 4:30 p.m., of heart failure, aged 63 years and 10 days.
George W. Chance was born near Waverly, Ill., October 26, 1840, and was the eldest child of Ezekiel and Nancy Chance, old and well respected residents of the southwest vicinity. He lived with his parents until the breaking out of the Civil war, when, on April 1, 1862, he enlisted in Co. G, Thirteenth Illinois cavalry, and followed the fortunes of that regiment until May 4, 1865, when he received an honorable discharge and returned to his old home enfeebled in health by his long and arduous military service.
About the year 1868 he was united in marriage to Miss Jane Miner, and to them were born three children, two sons and one daughter, the latter alone surviving him. This union was dissolved about five years later by the death of his wife. After her death Mr. Chance followed railroading for several years in Texas, Arkansas, Missouri and California, until compelled to abandon that vocation on account of impaired health.
On July 22, 1901, he was married to Miss Julia Scott, only daughter of the late Zela Scott, of Appalonia. Since that time he had resided in Waverly where he had formed many friends by his genial disposition and well defined character.
In the early part of 1901 he professed religion and united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and was faithful to the tenets of his church up to the hour of his sudden death.
His war record covered a period of 3 years - years of hardships and danger. The "Thirteenth" participated in thirty-five hard fought battles and skirmishes, and marched many countless miles, and this loyal and faithful soldier followed his regiment through all, sacrificing health and oftimes risking life in the performance of his duty. He was a soldier in every sense of the word.
He was a member of John W. Ross post No. 331, G. A. R., of this city and his comrades of that post sorrow with the bereaved wife and relatives in their great loss.
Comrade Chance is survived by his wife, two sisters, Mrs. Mary Flanders, of Kansas City, Mo., who was present at the funeral, and a sister living at Topeka, Kas.; one brother, James, of Kansas City, and one daughter, Mrs. Ocy Howell of Little Rock, Ark.
Funeral services were held at the M. E. church at 2 p.m. Saturday, conducted by the Rev. R. A. Hartrick after which the remains were taken to East Cemetery and committed to the grave under the impressive burial service of the Grand Army of the Republic.
J.H.G.
Card of Thanks. Our heartfelt thanks are hereby extended to the many friends, who so kindly rendered us assistance in the hours of our great bereavement. Mrs. Julia Chance. Mrs. Mary Flanders (Friday, Nov. 13, 1903)

CHAPIN, Q. H.

Q. H. CHAPIN DEAD FROM PNEUMONIA
Former Resident Here Dies In Chicago
S. O. Barr received word yesterday morning of the death of Q. H. Chapin who passed away at the home of a relative in Chicago at 3:20 Saturday morning. His illness was pneumonia but no further particulars were given.Mr. Chapin was the son of Cortes Chapin and was born in New England 75 years ago.
When he was small his father came to this county and bought the farm afterward owned by Samuel Newton.He served in the artillery organization during the war of the rebellion and after his discharge entered the railway mail service, having first a run between this place and Peoria on the old P. P. & J. road.
Later he was transferred to the Wabash with a run between Lafayette, Indiana, and Quincy, this state.
While on this run his train was standing on a crossing near Danville when a flat car on another road was run into the mail car and Mr. Chapin was taken up dreadfully wounded. He was removed to his home on South Prairie street and lingered some time between life and death but finally recovered though he was never the same after his injury.He was first married to Miss Lizzie Carrigan, niece of Mrs. John and the first Mrs Lyman True and cousin of Mrs. George Daniels of this city. They were the parents of one son, Harry, who died several years ago. His wife died not many years after their marriage and he was married the second time to Mrs. William Mosby, sister of Mrs. S. O. Barr, with whom he lived most happily till last fall when she was taken away after a married life of nearly fifty years.
He had three brothers, Captain Horace and Lyman, both dead and Cornelius, residing in Kansas; two sisters, Mrs. Thomas Catlin, mother of Miss Lucy Catlin and now deceased and another living in the east.He was a member of State street church, Urania Lodge No. 243 I. O. O. F. and George H. Thomas Post Grand Army of the Republic of Chicago and in which organization all the honors were conferred on him. He was a genial, whole souled gentleman, kind to his family and devoted to his dear ones, gentlemanly to all with whom he came in contact, a brave soldier and upright citizen.
The remains will be sent to this city for interment but it is not yet known on what train they will arrive.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Sunday Morning, March 4, 1917 - He was buried in Diamond Grove Cemetery, Jacksonville, Morgan Co., IL)

CHURCH, Benjamin F. 
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

was born at White Hall, Ill. March 11, 1844; died at his home in Springfield,Ill. June 28, 1911, aged 67 years, 8 months, 17 days. He was the son of Levi and Esther Church and came with his parents to Waverly in 1848. He had two sisters, Julia E., wife of Wm. A. Hutchison of Waverly, and Esther J. wife of Chester Tracy of Chicago; and two brothers, Homer K. and Charles E., all dead except Charles E. who survives.
Mr. Church was a member of the Waverly Methodist Episcopal church. He was a soldier in the Civil war, having enlisted at the outbreak of the Rebellion in Co. I, 14th Illinois Volunteers, serving four years.
At the close of the war he returned to Waverly where he resided until 1902, when he moved to Springfield and has since been employed as a traveling salesman. He served two terms as postmaster in the eighties, the remainder of his life in this city being spent in the lightning rod business.
He was married to Emma Weber of Indianapolis, Ind., Feb. 28, 1869. Born to them were four children, J. Edwin, Lee Walter, Frank O. and Louise. His wife departed this life June 12, 1890 in this city.
On September 30, 1891, he was married to Kate Rusharp of Indianapolis, Ind. Who survives him.
There was born to this union, one son, Clifford R., now living in Springfield.
Funeral services were held at the First M.E. church at 4 o'clock Friday afternoon, in charge of the pastor, Rev. L. G. Adams. Interment was in East Cemetery. (July 7, 1911)

CLARK, William R.  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

The funeral of William R. Clark was held at the undertaking establishment of C. T. Bisch & Son in Springfield last Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock and the body brought to this city that afternoon for interment in East cemetery, the services at the grave being in charge of Rev. Guy B. Williamson, pastor of the Christian Church. At the funeral services in Springfield, Gov. John R. Tanner circle No. 54, Ladies of the G. A. R., conducted a flag service. Mr. Clark was well known in Waverly, having been proprietor of the old Waverly Hotel for a number of years. He is survived by his wife and one son, Henry of St. Louis; three daughters; Mrs. S. J. Workman, of Springfield; Mrs. J. F. Salee of Litchfield; and Mrs. E. A. Rochell of Clinton, Iowa
(Aug. 18, 1911)


COARD, F. M.  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

FORMER WAVERLY CITIZEN PASSES AWAY
- Died at Home in Jacksonville After Lingering Illness at Age of 84 Years.
F. M. Coard, at one time a Waverly business man, died Sunday night at 9:15 at his home in Jacksonville, after years of failing health. Until recent years, after Mr. Coard's health failed, Mr. and Mrs. Coard have made occasional visits in Waverly, where they have numerous friends. Though Mr. Coard became ill about four years ago, he was able until the past few weeks to enjoy the company of friends and take an interest in the affairs of the world at large.

Decedent was born April 14, 1841, at St. Andrew's N. B., the son of Scotch parents. With his grandfather he came to Illinois early in life, after having lived for a time in the state of Maine. He worked on the farm and later engaged in school teaching. He was for several years a teacher in the Lick Creek school near Old Berlin.
In 1861 Mr. Coard enlisted in the 101st Illinois Volunteer Infantry as a member of Company G. He served thru some of the most active campaigns of the Civil War, and remained in the army until he was mustered out in June 1865. He was with Sherman on the march from Atlanta to the sea and was on the gunboat Switzerland when Admiral Farragut's fleet ran the rebel blockade at Vicksburg.
On November 8, 1865, Mr. Coard was married to Miss Mary Eunice Knapp of Waverly. The young couple settled here, where Mr. Coard engaged in the undertaking business. The family remained in Waverly until 1890, when the undertaking establishment was destroyed by fire. In the latter year Mr. Coard removed to Jacksonville and set up an undertaking business, which he continued for about twenty-five years.
Altho Mr. and Mrs. Coard had no children of their own, five orphans received love and care and grew to maturity under their roof. Three of these are children of Mr. Coard's brother, they are: Mrs. Mary Radford of Trinidad, Colo., Mrs. Merton Mackney of Mesa, Ariz., and J. L. Coard of Indianapolis. Mrs. Coard also survives.

Funeral services were held at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the family residence in Jacksonville, in charge of Rev. A. P. Howells, pastor of First Baptist church, where Mr. Coard was an active and faithful member. Rev. Howells was assisted in the service by Rev. W. E. Spoonts and Rev. W. R. Johnson.
The remains were brought to Waverly Wednesday morning, and taken to the Baptist church, where funeral services were held at 10:30, in charge of Rev. J. E. Curry, assisted by Rev. H. S. Lucas. Mrs. W. A. Barrow and Mrs. J. H. Shutt sang "Peaceful Slumber", "City Foursquare" and "When They Ring Those Golden Bells For You and Me", accompanied by Miss Maude Hart.
The pall bearers were H. J. Rodgers of Jacksonville, S. W. Rodgers, Thomas Rodgers, W. A. Barrow, Lewis Allen and Owen Mann. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Owen Mann and Mrs. Mabel Ford.
Interment was made in East cemetery. (Friday, March 28, 1924)


COE, William  
(Click for CEMETERY READING)

Died - On Wednesday afternoon April 20, 1904, William, the fourth son of Asahel and Maria Coe.
Only a few words, but how full their story. What a depth of sorrow they speak. Only He who said "When thou passeth through the water I will be with thee," can speak consolation to the sorrowing heart in such a time as this. His death was due to cerebral meningitis. For months kind friends have watched him fail in strength day by day, but were unable to stay the disease which was so slowly but surely consuming life. The silver chord is loosened, the golden bowl is broken, life's fitful fever o'er and he sleeps..
Mr. Coe was born near Waverly, on what is known as the McCracken farm November 13, 1841. He has lived almost his entire life, in this vicinity, and while he was not one of Waverly's regular business men, yet at one time he had a successful tin and stove business on the south side of the square. In his death Waverly loses one of its best known and most respected citizens, and his familiar presence will be sadly missed by all. He was a man of strong personality, a loyal friend and a good citizen; one of his strongest personalities being the extreme love he had for his family, his friends and his home. He had served his city many times in an official capacity, duties he performed without fear of criticism or hope for advancement - performing his work faithfully, honestly and conscientiously. He was among the first in this city to respond to his country's call for volunteers in 1861, and enlisted in Company I, of the Fourteenth Illinois volunteer infantry, serving his term of enlistment with fidelity and courage. He was a charter member of the John W. Ross post No. 331, G. A. R. of this city, and also of the local M. W. A. order, retaining his membership in both orders till his death.

The funeral was held from his late residence April 22, at 2 p.m. and was conducted by Rev. Charles Hill, pastor of the Christian church in this place. The remarks were based upon the words, "Earth is not our rest." He spoke of the unrest in nature, in nations, and in man himself; of the inability of things animate or inanimate to satisfy the unrestfulness of man. Nothing but the life of God in man gives rest and quiet to humanity. The comforting song service was rendered by Misses Verry and Laws and Messrs. Turnbull and Harney. "Nearer, My God to thee," "Asleep in Jesus," "Rock of Ages" and "Gathering Homeward, one by one," were sung at the house, and "Abide with me" was sung at the grave.
The interment was in East cemetery, where the beautiful and impressive burial service of the M. W. A. was rendered, the G. A. R. also paying their tribute of respect to their dead comrade.
The pallbearers were F. H. Wemple, J. R. Chambers and J. M. Chriswell, representing the Grand Army, and Jas. Cranfield, O. W. Lowe and J. D. Henry, representing the Modern Woodmen.
Mr. Coe leaves a wife, one son, Robert, two sisters, four brothers, and numerous other relatives to mourn his death. These all, with one voice, unite to thank him or her who in anyway contributed to alleviate sorrow of this our bereavement.
Among those present from abroad were Mrs. Loren Coe, Miss Mae Coe, Geo. Coe and wife, Lon Coe and wife, Edward Coe, Allan Coe and wife, all of Springfield, and Alfred Coe and wife, of Girard.
Loving hands had most beautifully decorated the parlor, in which the body lay, with a profusion of cut flowers, ferns, wreaths, lilies and roses, while on every hand were tokens of esteem. Many handsome pieces were given - one from each lodge, one from the Eastern Star, others from nephews and nieces and one from Minneapolis, besides those from home relatives and friends.
(Vol. XXXI, No. 52, Waverly Journal, dated 29 Apr 1904)


COOK, James Marion
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPTION)

PROMINENT BUSINESS MAN DEAD
oldest son of Wm. H. and Elizabeth Taylor Cook, was born in Hart's Prairie,December 19, 1844, and died at his home in Waverly, Sunday, February 28, 1915, aged 70 years, 2 monthsand 9 days.
He enlisted in Co. H of the famous 101st Illinois regiment, August 9, 1862 and was mustered out June 24, 1865. He saw hard service and at the battle of Dallas, Georgia, lost his right limb. After he came home, he learned the trade of a saddler with the late Michael Rapp and worked several years for him and George Hillerby. He then moved to Franklin where he resided ten years and finally came to Waverly where he has been in business for twenty-three years. He was married August 10, 1869 to Miss Mary A. Clegg of this county who died December 2, 1905. To this union were born two sons and two daughters, one daughter, Elizabeth, dying in infancy. On January 30, 1907, he was again united in marriage to Mrs. Mary L. Foster of Waverly who survives him.
He professed faith in Christ and united with the Franklin M.E. church in 1886, later moving his membership to the M. E. church at Waverly, of which he lived a faithful member. He was a member of Illini lodge No. 4, I. O. O. F., of Jacksonville and of the John W. Ross Post, G. A. R. of Waverly. Mr. Cook was a kind and loving husband and father, a good neighbor, an honorable business man and an upright citizen.
He is survived by his wife; two sons, Wm. T. of Murrayville and James H. of Hanover, one daughter, Mrs. J. B. Roach of this city; and two step daughters, Mrs. J. E. Bastien of Easton and Miss Elizabeth R. Foster of this city; also ten grandchildren. Besides these he leaves a sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Ferguson of Alexander, his two brothers, William and Sylvanus having preceded him in death.
The funeral services were held at the First M. E. church Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock. Rev. J. S. Smith, pastor of the church officiated, assisted by Rev. H. M. Ellis and Rev. R. J. Watts of the M. E. Church South. The members of the I. O. O. F. and Rebekah lodges and the G. A. R. Post attended the funeral in a body, the I. O. O. F. and G. A. R. having charge of the services at East cemetery.

CORAY, Silas G. -
(Jacksonville East Cemetery)

Silas G. Coray, a resident of Jacksonville for more than fifty years, died at his home, 751 Hardin avenue at 2 o'clock Thursday morning. He had been ill since September 11.
Silas G. Coray was born in Nauvoo, Illinois, March 4, 1842. He grew to manhood in that city and when the Civil war started he enlisted in Company K, 16th Regiment Illinois Infantry at New Salem, Illinois. He served during the four years of the war making a splendid record.
At the close of the war Mr. Coray came to Jacksonville where he has since made his home. He was twice married.
His first wife was Miss Cornelia Wells to whom he was married October 21, 1865, in this city. He was again married in Chicago, July 6, 1896 to Mrs. Emma May Davidson, who survives. He is also survived by two sons, Edward and Charles Coray, both resident in Colorado Springs, Colo.
During his residence here Mr. Coray followed the occupation of carpenter contractor and was accounted most skilled in his work. He was a member of State Street Presbyterian church and his private and public life was such that he commanded the respect of the entire community in which he lived.
Funeral services will be held from the residence, 751 Hardin avenue in charge of the Rev. E. B. Landis and members of Matt Starr Post, G. A. R. The services will be private owing to the prevalence of influenza. Burial will be in
Jacksonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 18 Oct 1918)

CORE, ASBURY B.

A. B. Core, veteran of the civil war and for many years a resident of Jacksonville died at the Soldier's home in Quincy Saturday morning at 10:30 o'clock. Mr. Core was born in Frankford, a suburb of Philadelphia pa., November 16, 1830 and was nearly 87 years of age at the time of death. He came to Jacksonville some time before the civil war and made this his home continuously for many years, going to the Soldier's home a few years ago.
He was a contractor and carpenter and when he first came to Jacksonville did considerable contracting work. He was a fine mechanic and one of the houses he erected was the Robert Hockenhull residence on Grove street which is now a part of the Old people's Home. This was built in 1858.
After he quit contracting he entered the employ of Wood & Montgomery and worked for that firm during all the years it was in existence and when it was dissolved after the death of Mr. Montgomery Mr. Core continued in the employ of Abram Wood during Mr. Wood's life. Of recent years Mr. Core was not able to work steadily at his trade.
Mr. Core was three times married. His present wife survives and is also at the Soldier's home in Quincy where she is seriously ill in the hospital and will not be able to attend the funeral. He also is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Edward McEvers of Miami, Fla.; and Miss Hattie Core of Los Angeles, Calif., and one son, John Core of Philadelphia.
During the civil war Mr. Core enlisted in the 101st regiment and served thru the conflict. He was a member of Matt Starr Post G. A. R., and of Harmony Lodge No. 3, A. F. and A. M. He was a man of genial disposition and was highly regarded by a large circle of friends. The remains will be brought here for burial this morning.
Funeral services will be held from Grace church Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of Rev. F. B. Madden and the Masonic order.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Sunday Morning, February 4, 1917 - Mr. Core was buried in Jacksonville
East Cemetery, Jacksonville, Morgan Co., IL


COX, Augustus

Augustus Cox died recently at the home of his daughter, Mrs. J. W. Spaur near Ricaards, Mo., according to word received by W. T. Stout of east of the city.
Mr. Cox was born in Morgan county, Ill., Dec. 29, 1842, being 84 years of age. During the Civil War he served in Company K, 101st Illinois Infantry.
Following the war Mr. Cox went to Stotesbury, Mo., where he resided for more than fifty years. His wife preceded him in death January 27, 1927.
Surviving are a son, Charles Cox of Stotesbury, Mo., two brothers, Lee Cox, Maple Grove and Samuel Cox of West Liberty neighborhood; a sister, Mrs. Ada Blocklinger of LaHarpe, Kansas, and many other relatives and friends.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd 25 Oct 1927)

COX, Richard C.
 (See Cemetery Listing)

Civil War Veteran Dies After Long Illness
Richard C. Cox, son of Richard and Mary Cox, was born near Little York, northwest of Waverly,
January 5, 1847, and died at his home in this city Monday, January 21, 1924, aged 77 years and 16 days.
Last April Mr. Cox was stricken with an attack of flu, from which he never recovered.
In 1867 he was married to Sarah Ann Rynders, and to this union were born five children: Mrs. Martha Alice Adkin, of Mound City, Kansas; Mrs. Josephine Thompson of Dixon Ill.; Lillie Lee, who died in infancy; Jud Cox of Tacoma Washington; and John Cox of St. Louis.
On February 14, 1899 he was married to Mrs. Luretta Burnett, who survives him. He is also survived by two half brothers, William Miner of Waverly, and Luther Beasley of Windsor, Mo., and by eight grandchildren.
Mr. Cox was a Civil War veteran, enlisting in 1862 in Company G, 101st Illinois Infantry, and was discharged at the end of the war in 1865.

Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. C. W. Andrew, pastor of M.E. Circuit, assisted by Rev. W. E. Whitlock, pastor of the First M. E. Church.
A quartet composed of Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. J. H. Shutt, Rev. H. S. Lucas and W. R. Turnbull, furnished the music, Miss Mattie Deatherage acting as accompanist.
The pall bearers were M. C. Hopson, J. T. Bowyer, R. E. Coe, C. F. Wemple, James Shekelton and Clay Davenport. Those who cared for the flowers were Mrs. Holland Burnett, Mrs. Robert Etter, Mrs. Carl Blair, Misses Olive Burnett, Sodie Miner and Eunice VanWinkle.
Interment was in East Cemetery.

CRISWELL, John M.
(See Cemetery Listing)

WAVERLY UNION VETERAN DIES
Was Last Surviving Civil War Soldier In His Community.
Waverly, Aug. 4 - John M. Criswell, 91, last Civil war veteran of this community, died at 3:40 p.m. today at his home in Appalonia neighborhood, west of here.
Mr. Criswell was the last member of the John W. Ross post, Grand Army of the Republic and two years ago on Memorial day, was honored as the community's last "of the boys in blue" at a great community gathering.
Mr. Criswell was born near Nortonville, Nov. 1, 1844, a son of George and Jane Criswell. He enlisted in Company K, Second Illinois Field Artillery, Dec. 15, 1863, served the remainder of the war and was discharged at Chicago, July 17, 1865. He married Miss Hannah M. Nall, who died in 1877. One daughter, Mrs. John Deatherage died in Jacksonville a few weeks ago.
Mr. Criswell is survived by a son Edgar, who resided with him, and five grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at the First Methodist Church in this city at 3:15 p.m. Thursday, Rev. George M. Wilson, Rushville, former pastor of Appalonia M. E. church of which Mr. Criswell was a member will officiate. Interment will be in East cemetery.
John M. Criswell
Hearts were heavy and heads were bowed in sorrow this week for John M. Criswell, Waverly's last surviving veteran of the Civil War died Tuesday afternoon at 3:40 o'clock. For the past few months Mr. Criswell had been in declining health, but it was only recently that his condition became serious. He retained his interest in affairs until near the end, conversing with the family on the day of his death upon topics of the day. When the morning paper came Tuesday he asked, as was his usual custom, "what's the news?" About a half hour before his death he realized he was dying and said, "I'm going," and told the members of his family good-bye.
Mr. Criswell was born November 1, 1844, at Nortonville, Illinois, and died at his home just west of Appalonia church August 4, 1936, at the age of 91 years, 9 months and 3 days. At the age of four he moved to Providence community, near Franklin, and in 1874 he bought the farm where he lived until his death.
On December 30, 1863, he enlisted in Company K, Second Illinois Field Artillery, and saw service as a guard along the Mississippi River. He was discharged at Chicago on July 14, 1865, having attained the rank of corporal. He came through the war without being wounded.
In 1870 he was married to Miss Hannah Nall, who died in 1877. A daughter, Mrs. John Deatherage of Jacksonville, died last June 28.
For more than fifty years mr. Criswell was a member of Appalonia church on the Waverly M. E. circuit.
Those who survive are one son, Edgar Criswell, with whom Mr. Criswell resided; and five grandchildren, Mrs. Harold Ferguson, of Iowa City, Iowa; Russell Deatherage, of Kansas City, Mo.; Miss Ruth Deatherage and Mrs. Ralph Gillham, of Jacksonville; and Russell Criswell at home.

CRUMPLER, William      
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

CIVIL WAR VETERAN ANSWERS FINAL CALL
Well Known in the Community, Died June 5th, at Advanced Age.
William Crumpler, a Civil War veteran, died at his home in this city Thursday night last week at 10:00 o'clock, at the age of 80 years, 2 months and 20 days. Mr. Crumpler was well known in this city, where he had lived for twenty-one years. For several years he acted as mail carrier, conveying the mail to and from the trains and post-office. He had been in poor health for the past seven years, but was confined to his bed for only two weeks before his death. He had been a member of the Baptist Church for many years.
Mr. Crumpler was born in Nashville, Tenn., March 16, 1844, and when only a small boy came to this county, where he has resided most of the time since. On March 17, 1872 he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Rodney of Roodhouse, Rev. L. W. Culver officiating. To this union were born two children, Rollo Crumpler of New Holland, and Mrs. William Wells of Franklin, who together with his wife, survive him.
He also leaves fourteen grandchildren and five great grandchildren; a brother, L. H. Crumpler of Independence, Kansas, and one half sister, Mrs. Alice Clayton of Hazen, Arkansas.
Deceased served four years in the Civil war, a member of Co. K, 2nd Illinois Light Artillery. After the close of the war he spent three years in service in the regular army.
Funeral services were held at the residence Sunday afternoon, June 8, at 2:30, in charge of Rev. H. S. Lucas, pastor of the Baptist church. A quartet composes of Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. J. H. Shutt, Rev. H. S. Lucas and Wm. Schreiber sang "Face to Face", "When They Ring Those Golden Bells for You and Me", and Rev. Lucas sang as a solo, "Home of the Sou." The bearers were V. G. Keplinger, Frank Lambert, Walter Dikis, John Bostic, Jay Rodgers and Jesse Samples. Members of the G. A. R. acted as honorary pall bearers. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Dwight Wells of Springfield and Mrs. Vertis Mangold of Chicago.
Interment was in Franklin cemetery.
(The Waverly Journal, Vol. 52, No. 11, June 13, 1924)

CULLY, Oliver H. -
(Diamond Grove Cemetery)

OLIVER H. CULLY DIES AT HIS HOME SATURDAY
Pneumonia Causes Death of Civil War Veteran and Long time Resident of Jacksonville and Morgan County - Funeral Monday.
Oliver H. Cully, a civil war veteran and one of the respected citizens of Jacksonville passed away Saturday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at his home at 279 Sandusky street, after an illness of but few days duration from pneumonia, at the age of 86 years, 2 months and 13 days.
Deceased was born near Connersville, Fayette county, Indiana, April 30, 1832, the son of Wallace and Mary Cully. He came with his parents to Illinois in 1852, driving thru in a wagon. The family settled on the old home place, six miles northeast of Jacksonville.
Mr. Cully was married the 23rd of November, 1865 to Elvira J. Green, daughter of Stephen and Cynthia Green and to them were born seven children, four boys and three girls. He was preceded in death by his wife and one daughter, Clara B., the living children being Charles W., Homer G., Lena A., Mrs. A. D. Arnold of Arnold Station, Edgar O., Eva E., Mrs. J. C. Strawn and Howard S.
When the Civil War broke out Mr. Cully enlisted in Company K, 101st Illinois Infantry, under Captain Sylvester Moore, and honorably served his country in her time of deepest need. Enlisting August 7, 1862 he served three years, receiving his discharge at Washington, D. C., in June, 1865.
After the war Mr. Cully returned to Morgan county and settled down to the duties of civilian life. He followed the occupation of his father and in due time owned one of the finest farms in the state. Some years ago he began to have poor health and owing also to his years was unable to carry on his farm to his satisfaction so he gave it over to his sons and moved to Jacksonville in 1903 and has lived here since.
He united with the Christian church in early manhood and has always lived a consistent Christian life. He had the esteem of a large circle of friends who will learn of his death with regret.
The funeral will be held at the residence, 279 Sandusky street, Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 14 July 1918)
CULLY - Funeral services for Oliver H. Cully were held from the residence, 279 Sandusky street, Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock in charge of the Rev. Myron Pontius, pastor of Central Christian church. Dr. Pontius who is doing religious work at Camp Rockford, came to the city especially to preach the funeral sermon.
Dr. Pontius took his text from the last chapter of Galatians, “Put upon yourself the whole armor of God.” In applying these words to the life of Mr. Cully, the speaker dwelt upon two thoughts, “First, that he had put upon himself the armor of a soldier during the Civil War.
“His record” said Mr. Pontius, “Was a peculiar one. He was with Sherman in his March to the Sea, in the last two years of that campaign, Mr. Cully never missed a roll call. This was indicative to his faithfulness to service. It also indicated his great patriotism and love of country.
This patriotism was shown in his great interest in the present war which he followed closely thru the daily press.
“Second, he put upon himself the armor of a Christian soldier. The invisible armor of righteousness and service.
The armor that provides us with visible weapons to win spiritual battles.”
Hymns were sung by a quartet composed of Miss Cora Graham, Miss Lorine Deweese, Jr., Phillip Read and T. H. Rapp.
The many beautiful floral offerings were cared for by Ruby Cully, Mrs. Mervin Ator, Miss Strawn and Ida Maddox.
Burial was in Diamond Grove cemetery, the bearers being Clyde turner, Floyd, Byron and Benjamin Cully and Mervin Ator. The honorary bearers were members of Matt Starr Post G. A. R., who attended the service in a body and were L. Goheen, S. T. Maddox, J. M. Swales, R. R. Stevenson, T. B. Orear and C. Riggs Taylor.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 16 July 1918)

CURVIN, Arthur
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

Friday, June 4, 1915.
Veteran Railroad Man is Dead.
Arthur Curvin Dies at St. John's Hospital in Springfield After a Short Illness.
Arthur Curvin, a Civil war veteran and widely known for his many years of continuous railroad service on the old J. S. E. and later J. and St. L., railroad, died at St. John's hospital in Springfield at 10:30 o'clock Saturday morning, May 29, after an illness of only two days, aged 79 years.
Mr. Curvin was a native of Ireland, coming to this country when he was a small boy. He was industrious, at first going onto a farm and later entering the service of the J. S. E. railroad, where he served faithfully as a section foreman until a few years after the Burlington bought the road, when on account of his advanced age, he resigned. He was highly thought of by the many railroad men of his acquaintance who showed their esteem by presenting him with a gold watch and chain, he being at that time the oldest man in the company's service.
After retiring from active work Mr. Curvin resided in Waverly until about a year ago, since which time he has lived with his children.
Mr. Curvin is survived by seven children and nineteen grandchildren. The children are as follows:
Mrs. James Rynders of Alton; Mrs. John Tompkins of Jacksonville; Mrs. C. Sinniger of Springfield; John Curvin of Carlinville; James Curvin of Virden; Joe Curvin of Chicago and Patsy Curvin of Waverly.
Funeral services were held in St. Sebastian's church Monday morning at 11 o'clock, Rev. Francis
Kehoe of Alton officiating. Burial was in the Catholic cemetery.
The pallbearers were members of the G. A. R. as follows: J. W. Luttrell, Virgil Bishop, Jabez Mitchell, Wm. Crumpler, B. F. Keplinger and Jerome Dupy.

DARLEY, Benjamin 
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Civil War Veteran Dies
- Died at Passavant Hospital in Jacksonville Monday at Age of 85.
Benjamin Darley, well known resident of Waverly and a veteran of the Civil war, died Monday at Passavant hospital in Jacksonville following an illness of pneumonia. Deceased was born in Morgan county, Illinois, May 25, 1846, and spent his entire life in the Waverly and Franklin community. He was 85 years, 8 months and 20 days of age at the time of his death.
During his active life Mr. Darley was a farmer. At an early age he joined the Methodist church in Franklin under the ministry of Rev. H. M. Hamill and at the time of his death was a member of the First M. E. church of this city. He served about a year in the Civil War.
In 1873 he was united in marriage to Mary Fanning and to this union one son, William, was born, who died in 1912. Mrs. Darley died in 1911 and he later was married to Elsie May Ford who died about five years ago. By his second marriage four children were born, Robert, Ruth, Mabel and George, the latter being the youngest child in the United States whose father was a veteran of the Civil War.
In addition to the four children, the other surviving relatives are two grandchildren Winifred and Carroll Darley, of near Denver, Colo.; one brother, George, of Waverly; two half brothers, Samuel, of Jacksonville, and Rev. Edward, of Stella, Neb.; and two half sisters, Mrs. W. D. McCormick and Mrs. Perry Cowgur, both of Jacksonville. One brother William Dawson, died in April, 1921, at Allerton, Illinois.
Funeral services were held in the First M. E. church Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, Rev. G. M. Wilson, pastor of the M. E. Circuit, officiating, assisted by Rev. H. C. Munch, pastor of the First M. E. church. A quartet consisting of Miss Bertha Parkin, Mrs. F. H. Curtiss, F. H. Curtiss and Rev. G. M. Wilson sang "Rock of Ages", "Lead Kindly Light" and "Going Down the Valley". Miss Mattie Deatherage was the accompanist.
The pall bearers were A. H. Shekelton, Jesse Sample, Earl Bridges, Wilbur Dasney, Eugene Hart and Ernest Richardson, all members of the American Legion.
The flowers were cared for by Misses Meta and Mary Darley, nieces of the deceased. Mr. Darley was buried with military honors, the services at the grave being in charge of the Waverly Post of the American Legion.
Burial was in Waverly cemetery.
(Feb. 19, 1932)

DAWSON, Josiah - ( -1916)

A telegram received here by Mrs. Malissa Ellis announced the death of her brother, Josiah Dawson, at the Old Soldiers' home in Quincy. The deceased, who was seventy eight years of age, was for many years employed as a blacksmith at the establishment of J. W. Hall & Sons. He served for several years during the war of the Rebellion and was a man who had the respect of all who knew him. The deceased is survived by his wife, and three sons, Frank Dawson, Bailey Dawson and Earl Dawson. He also leaves the following brothers and sisters: John Dawson of this city; Robert Dawson of Springfield; Newton Dawson of Oklahoma City; Charles Dawson of Louisiana; Minnie of Virginia, Ill.; Mrs. Hattie Stillwell, Independence, Kansas.
Arrangements for the funeral have not been made and will be announced later.
(Jacksonville Journal, September 27, 1916)

DENNISON, Samuel Jefferson 
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son of Hetty and Samuel Dennison, was born in Baron [sic Barren] county, Kentucky, May 11, in the year of our Lord, 1818, and died Saturday, Nov. 25, 1905, at 11:15 p.m., being 87 years, 6 months and 14 days old.
At the age of fifteen, in 1833, he volunteered at Nashville, Tenn., to fight the Indians of Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama. After the war and an honorable discharge, he drove a four horse team to Mason county, Illinois, living there about seven years. Since that time Sangamon and Morgan counties have been his home. In the year 1843 he was united in the holy bonds of matrimony to Miss Nancy G. Hope. To this union two children were born, Mrs. Emily H. Morgan of Hamburg, Iowa, and William Walker Dennison.
In the year 1865 and month of September he was again remarried to Mrs. Salina J. Rawley. To this union four children were born - Fletcher, the eldest, dying in infancy; Charles Elmer Dennison, of Chicago; Mrs. Fred Houghton, of Chicago, and Miss Mary Belle Dennison, of Waverly. During the War of the Rebellion he enlisted in Co. G, One Hundred and First Illinois volunteer infantry, and during the three years of conflict served his country faithfully. He was once taken a prisoner, at Holly Springs, Miss.; a parole of six months was granted at this time, and he again fought for the "old flag". IN 1837 he was converted and united with the Presbyterian church and was identified with the same for seven years, after which he entered the Baptist church at Berlin. From there he moved his membership to the Brick church, known as the Apple Creek church. He said in this last move that he would keep his membership there until he moved to that City above.
Funeral services were held at the Baptist church at 2 p.m. Tuesday, the Rev. E. K. Masterson, pastor, officiating, assisted by the Rev. R. H. Fairburn, rector of the Christ (Episcopal) church. The remains were laid to rest in East cemetery in the presence of a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and sympathizing friends.
A precious one from us has flown,
A voice we loved is still;
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled.
At Rest.
CARD OF THANKS
We most sincerely wish to thank the many friends for the kindly assistance and sympathy shown by them during the illness and funeral services of our beloved husband and father, and will ever remember the kindness extended. Mrs. S. J. Dennison and Children
(Waverly, Illinois, Friday, December 1, 1905)

DICKINSON, Piercy
(Click here for Cemetery record for Ann w/o Piercy)

The subject of this sketch, Piercy Dickinson, was born in Thorton, Yorkshire, England, January 1, 1844 and Saturday morning at twenty minutes to five, after a few hours illness, passed away at his home 1 miles northwest of Lynnville.
He was a son of Thomas and Mary Piercy Dickinson, the youngest child. He was preceded in death by four brothers and eight sisters and is survived by two brothers, George of Monticello and Hartas of Cardallis, Ore. At the age of five years Mr. Dickinson came to this country with his parents and settled on the place now owned by George Fligg and moved to the place where he died on March 9, 1855. At the age of 17 years, August 1, 1861, he enlisted in the Civil War, as a drummer boy of Co. F, Thirty-third Ill. Inft.
He was discharged Dec. 31, 1863, re-enlisted the next day, January 1, 1864 and was honorably discharged November 24, 1865, being in the service four years, 3 months and 23 days.
March 28, 1873 Mr. Dickinson was united in marriage to Miss Ann Eliza Reaugh of Murrayville and they were the parents of one child, Oliver Reaugh Dickinson, who survives. April 2, 1875 the wife and mother was called home. Mr. Dickinson united with the Lynnville Christian church under the ministry of E. J. Marlow and lead a consistent Christian life. Mr. Dickinson was a man of rare personality, being a lover of nature, he made it a part of his life, and no man loved flowers, plants and trees more than he, as is manifested in his home. Politically he was a Democrat by ballot but lived a Prohibition life. He was thoroughly domestic and unpretentious. A kind and loving father, an affectionate uncle, he leaves to mourn his sudden and wholly unprepared demise, one son, Oliver, his niece, Miss Dickinson; an aged brother George, of Monticello, and a brother Harlas of Oregon, and a host of nieces, nephews and friends.
(Jacksonville Journal, 31 Mar 1914)

DOUGHERTY, John Seborn
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DOUGHERTY, J. S. DIES.
John Seborn Dougherty, almost a life long resident of this community, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Peyton Bland, north of town, Friday night at 10 o'clock. He had been in failing health for several years.
The deceased was born in Tennessee Jan. 18, 1835, being 84 years old at the time of his death. He came to Illinois with his parents when a small child and has since resided in the Franklin vicinity.
He was united in marriage many years ago to Miss Jennie Evans, who died in 1904. To their union were born six children, two of whom preceded him in death. Those surviving are Gabe, of Paris, Mo., John W., of Jerseyville, Mrs. Wm. Six, of Goss, Mo., and Mrs. Peyton Bland, with whom he has made his home since the death of his wife. He received loving care and attention in his daughter's home and his declining years were filled with comfort and happiness.
He was a farmer by occupation and was very successful, retiring from active work some years ago.
He was held in high regard in this community where most of his life was spent. He was a veteran of the Civil war and was wounded in the battle of Shiloh. Mr. Dougherty was a member of the Franklin Christian church and of Franklin Lodge, No. 121, I. O. O. F.
Funeral services were conducted from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Peyton Bland, Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of Rev. H. W. Miller, former pastor of the M.E. church. Music was furnished by Misses Grace Hill, Lou Duncan and Maude Anderson, with Miss Grace Armstrong as accompanist. Misses Duncan and Hill sang "Whispering Hope" as a duet. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. J. E. Sinclair and Miss Anna Bateman.
Interment was made in the village cemetery. The services at the grave were in charge of members of Franklin I.O.O.F. Lodge. The bearers were Chas. W. Hart, Wm. R. Hills, C.E. Darling, H.M. Tulpin, W.L. Clayton and A.T. Bland.
(The Franklin Times - Oct. 2, 1919)

DUNCAN, John H.
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John H. Duncan was thrown off a train last Saturday near Virden and instantly killed. The accident occurred about as follows: When the train was nearing Virden John was passing from the rear coach to one in which the drum corps was, and just as he was closing the door before stepping across to the opposite coach the train struck a sharp curve, and he was quickly hurled into eternity, only one or two of the passengers seeing him fall. The train sped on to the depot as if nothing had happened, for it was several minutes late and running at pretty good speed. On arriving at the depot those who saw him thrown off made it known and quite a number went back, not even knowing who the ill-fated man was until they reached the spot where
he was lying dead. A justice of the peace was immediately notified and a jury impaneled, returning a verdict corresponding with the above facts. The body was then taken in charge by the G.A.R. of that city (he being a member of the Order at this place) and he was cared for until the 9 o'clock train when he was sent home, being met by a large number who were anxious to learn the particulars of his sudden and sad death, among them the G.A.R. of this place, who conveyed them to his mother's home. The funeral took place at the Methodist church next day (Sunday) at 3:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. McGhee, after which the remains were taken in charge by the Post of this place who bore them to the cemetery and after the usual ceremonies
according to their custom, were laid to rest to await the sounding of the last bugle call. The funeral was attended by one of the largest crowds that ever assembled in the church, and also at the cemetery. He leaves a wife and seven children, all of whom are under 14, except Willie and Henry, who are almost grown. This makes three of Mrs. A.G. Duncan's children that have died within less than five months. Will being the first, who died May 30th, 1892; Mrs. Emma Jolly, June 26th, 1892, and John October 15th, 1892. She, the family of the deceased, and other relatives have the sympathy of the entire community.

DUPY, Jerome E. 
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Civil War Veteran Called By Death
a well known and highly respected citizen of Waverly and community for many years, died Tuesday morning, October 5, 1926, at 3:30, at the home of his daughter Mrs. Fred Parkinson, east of Waverly. Mr. Dupy was a veteran of the Civil War, and had reached the advanced age of 88 years.
Mr. Dupy was born March 26, 1838 at Eaton, Ohio. He lived on a farm in Ohio until he was sixteen years of age, when he moved to Keokuk, Iowa overland in a prairie schooner.
He stayed in Iowa until he enlisted in the Seventh Iowa Regiment during the Civil War. He served as a member of the Keokuk Regimental band, until he was forced to leave for the hospital. He later camped two months in Burlington, Iowa, and from there he went to Jefferson Barracks, at St. Louis. He then went to Jersey County and stayed during a furlough, on account of ill health. When he recovered he was sent to Rock Island to guard prisoners. Because of vaccination he was again disabled. After the Civil War he returned to Jersey County, where he farmed for a number of years.
On December 27, 1864, he married Eleanor Fisher. They moved to a farm near Waverly, where they lived until they retired and moved to Waverly.
Early in their married life they united with the Methodist church at Prospect. Upon their removal to Waverly, their membership was transferred to the First M. E. church, where his membership continued.
He was also a member of the G. A. R., and the Modern Woodman of America.
Mr. and Mrs. Dupy lived in Waverly until Mrs. Dupy's death, January 23, 1921. All of the family of five children survive except one son, G. A. Dupy, who died October 17, 1917. The surviving children are: Mrs. J. C. Dikis, of Springfield, Mrs. F. W. Parkinson and Mrs. F. R. Pugh, of Waverly, and Mrs. L. J. Foster, of Auburn.
Ten grandchildren and six great grandchildren also survive him, the grandchildren being: Chas. Foster, Auburn; K. W. Parkinson, La Grange; Lucile Dougharty, Schenectady, N.Y.; Lester Parkinson, Jacksonville; Mildred Parkinson, Waverly; Olin Dupy, New York City; Vernon Dupy, New Orleans, La.; Leslie Dupy, Haiti Island; Ralph Dupy, New York City; and Edith Dupy, Springfield.
Funeral services were held at the First M.E. church, Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. A. R. Wassell.
(October 8, 1926)

EDMONDSON, Sandaman 
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Sandaman Edmondson was born in New York city, N. Y., May 16, 1839, and died at Waverly, Morgan county, Illinois, March 8, 1902, at 8:15 a.m., aged 62 years and 10 months. He moved to this state with his parents when 15 years old, in the year 1854, and has lived in Morgan county ever since. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, Mary; two daughters, Mrs. Charles Gray and Mrs. Charles Jones, and one son, Will, all of this city; two sisters, Mrs. Amanda McKeene, of St. Louis, and Mrs. Tillie Henderson, of Winchester, Ill., and one brother, Robert, of Franklin, all of whom were present at the funeral
Deceased was a veteran of the civil war, as shown by following copy of his discharge:
Know Ye: That Sandaman Edmondson, a Private of Captain John B. Duncan's Company (H), 32nd Regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers, who was enrolled on the First day of November, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty-One, to serve three years or during the war, is hereby discharged from the service of the United States, this 2d day of November 1864, at Chattanooga, Tenn., by reason of expiration of term of enlistment. (No objection to his being re-enlisted is known to exist.)
Alexander M. Wright, 2d Lieut. Com. Co.
Funeral services were held at the family residence at 2 p.m. Monday, March 10, conducted by the Rev. T. C. Coffey, of the Baptist church, followed by interment in East cemetery.
The pall-bearers were: James Cook, Timothy Jones, George T. Holmes, William Carr, William Coe and Chris Romang.
(Mar. 13, 1902 - The Enterprise, Vol.5, No. 13)


EMERICK, Lycurgus

The death of Lycurgus Emerick, a native of Morgan county and a veteran of the civil war, occurred at 1 o'clock this morning at his home, 322 West Douglas avenue. He was 82 years of age.
Mr. Emerick was a son of Andrew and Martha West Emerick, and had been a resident of the county all of his life, with exception of the time he spent in the service of his country. He made his home with his sister, Miss Mae Emerick.
The remains were removed to the Gillham Funeral Home. Arrangements for the service are not complete.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 11 Nov 1927)
Emerick
Services for Lycurgus Emerick, Civil War veteran and lifetime resident of this city were conducted at 2:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Gillham Funeral Home. Rev. Fred. Haskins officiating. Interment was in Jacksonville cemetery.
Mrs. Manchester and Mis Cosgriff were in care of the flowers. The bearers were Elmer Hatfield, D. T. Reinbach, Albert Emerick, John Boston, Peter hamm and Ansel Hodges.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 14 Nov 1927)


ENNIS, S. C.  
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ENNIS FUNERAL AT LITERBERRY TODAY
Services Will be Held at Baptist Church in Charge of Rev. F.M. Crabtree of White Hall - Interment in Liter Cemetery.
Literberry, Feb. 28 - S. C. Ennis, was born at Worcester, Maryland, Aug. 23, 1835 and died February 27, 1918.
Mr. Ennis came to Illinois when a young man and settled at Petersburg, Ill. Here he joined the Union army, under Captain S. H. Blaines, Company K, 106th regiment, Illinois Infantry on the 14th day of August 1862. Was honorably discharged on the 12th day of July, 1865 at Pine Bluff, Arkansas.
Mr. Ennis leaves a wife, one daughter, Mrs. Bert Olroyd, and six grandchildren, and one great grandchild. Funeral services will be at the Baptist church on Friday at one o'clock p.m. Rev. F. M. Crabtree of White Hall will have charge of the services; interment will be in the Liter cemetery, one mile northeast of town.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 1 Mar 1918)

EPLING, Floyd

SUDDEN DEATH OF FLOYD EPLING 
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Friday, September 22, 1916
Suffering a stroke of apoplexy, Floyd Epling died suddenly at his home Sunday afternoon. He was alone at the time, his daughters, Misses Adeline and Altia, being out for an automobile ride. Upon their return about a quarter of five o'clock they found him lying on the kitchen floor, his head at the door entering the sitting room. He could have been lying there but a short time, as the body was still warm and he had been seen by several persons only a short time before, having been down town. It is thought that he had just entered the house by the kitchen door, laid his hat on the kitchen table and started into the sitting room when he was stricken. It is believed death came so suddenly that life became extinct while still standing, this belief arising from the appearance of the wound caused by his head striking the door jamb.
Mr. Epling was born in Newport, Virginia, March 16, 1844 and died in Waverly September 17, 1916, at the age of 72 years, 6 months and 1 day.
When seventeen years old he enlisted in the Confederate army, a member of Co. F, 24th Regiment, Virginia, Kempers' Brigade, Pickett's Division, Longstreet's Corps, and did service four years.
While yet a lad he united with the Baptist church in his Virginia home. In 1867 he came to Illinois, locating in Auburn, but after a few months made his home in Waverly, where he has since resided.
An unusual occurrence in the life of Mr. Epling was that he came to Waverly 49 years ago in order to work on the school building then being erected on the east side of the square and at the time of his death he was at work on the same building, he and Mr. Meacham having the contract for taking off the third story and otherwise remodeling the building. The work was nearly completed as the board of education had arranged for the use of the building next Monday.
He was married to Miss Elizabeth Sweet in 1869, and after forty-seven years of married life, she preceded him in death March 1, 1916. For forty-one years he was associated in business with W. D. Meacham as carpenter and contractor. For many years he had been a member of the I. O. O. F. and Masonic lodges, being one of the oldest members of these orders.
He is survived by one brother, John H. Epling, of Auburn; two sons, A. J. Epling of Los Angeles, Calif., and Cyrus F. Epling of Terre Haute, Ind.; four daughters, Misses Adeline and Altia Epling, both of Waverly; Mrs. I. W. Miller of Springfield and Mrs. C. A. Hall of Athens; also four grandchildren, Carl Epling of Los Angeles, Chalmers Miller of Springfield and Margaret and Dorothy Dean Hall of Athens.
Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, Rev. S. C. Schaeffer, pastor of the church, officiating. The members of the I. O. O. F. and Masonic lodges attended the funeral in a body, and the Masonic lodge conducted the services at East Cemetery.

FERGUSON, Anthony
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Anthony Ferguson, a long time resident of Morgan county, died Tuesday evening at 5:30 o'clock, at his residence on Hardin avenue. Mr. Ferguson had been in failing health for a long period and his death was expected by those familiar with his condition. The deceased was born on a farm near this city, the son of Benjamin and Susan Ferguson, and his entire life was spent in this community. For a long period he followed the occupation of farmer with success and after giving up the arduous duties of the farm and becoming a resident of this city he for a number of years held the office of constable and met the duties of that position with faithfulness and efficiency.
The deceased was married Nov. 1, 1855, to Lucinda Tunnell and nine children were born to them, seven of whom survive. Some time subsequent to the death of his wife, Mr. Ferguson was again married. His second wife was Mrs. Grace F. Curts and their marriage occurred Dec. 5, 1905. Mrs. Ferguson survives, together with the children already mentioned, A. J. Ferguson, Jacksonville; Mrs. Susan Benson, Jerseyville; Mrs. Lizzie Ewen, Alexander; Mrs. Ida Todd, Buffalo; B. F. Ferguson, Jacksonville; Mrs. Edith Six, Alexander; Mrs. Maude Welch, Quincy. Two sons, W. T. and Horace Ferguson died a number of years since. The deceased also leaves one brother, Champion Ferguson of this city; four sisters and a brother having preceded him in death. There survive also twenty eight grandchildren and twenty one great grandchildren. Mr. Ferguson was a member of Central Christian church and so ordered his ways that he lived consistently with the teachings of that church. Faithfulness and honesty especially marked his life and he had the good will and good opinion of those who knew him well.
The remains will be taken this afternoon to the home of R. L. Pyatt on North Church street. Friends who wish to view the remains may call there after 6 o'clock this evening. The funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at Central Christian church, in the charge of Rev. M. L. Pontius. Interment will be in Antioch cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, May 23, 1917)

FISHBACK, Josiah 
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Josiah Fishback was born in Spencer county, Ky., August 14, 1844, and died at his home in this city, Tuesday, Jan. 26, 1909, at 9:40 p.m., aged 64 years, 5 months and 12 days.
Mr. Fishback came to Illinois when a young man and on Jan. 24, 1867, was married to Miss Martha Austin of Scottville, Ill., and to this union were born 6 children, namely, Mrs. G. B. Turner, Mrs. Geo. Copley, John W., Frank F., J. Olen and Raymond. Mrs. Turner, Olen and Raymond being present when their father died.
Mr. Fishback had always lived in or near Waverly, where he was engaged in farming and buying stock, and was well known to many of the large traders.
About twelve years ago his health began to fail, and since that time he has been compelled to give up trading and was confined to his home a greater part of the time and for the past month was confined to his bed until the end came, which was very peacefully.
Mr. Fishback served his country, being a member of Company B, 122nd Illinois Volunteers.
Funeral services were held at the First Methodist church, at 2 o'clock this (Friday) afternoon, and interment was made in East Cemetery.
Moon and stars are shining,
Upon one lonely grave
Where sleeps our dear, good father
Whom we loved but could not save.

Heaven now retains our treasure;
Earth the barren casket keeps,
And the sunlight loves to linger
Where our dear, good father sleeps.
(Jan. 29, 1909)

FOX, George R.
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George R. Fox, a prominent resident of the Chapin community, died last night at Passavant hospital at the advanced age of 83 years. Mr. Fox was admitted to the hospital a week ago, and his death was due to complications incident to old age.
For several years Mr. Fox has spent the winters in Hot Springs, Ark., and he returned from there several weeks ago. The aged man's son, Walter R. Fox, of New York City, was summoned and was at the bedside when the end came.
Funeral services will be held at the M. E. church of Chapin Sunday afternoon at 2:30. Jacksonville friends who may not be able to attend the funeral may view the remains at the Williamson Funeral Home any time before 12 o'clock Sunday noon. The casket will be open from 2 to 2:30 at the church.
Interment will be in Liberty cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 30 July 1927)

FINAL RITES FOR GEORGE FOX HELD IN CHAPIN SUNDAY
Impressive Funeral Services For Geo. Fox, Held Sunday Afternoon at Chapin M. E. Church
Chapin, Aug. 1 - Funeral services of very impressive nature for George Fox who passed away Friday at Jacksonville were conducted Sunday afternoon in the M. E. church at 2:30 o'clock.
The church was banked with beautiful floral tributes and music furnished by Miss Cora Graham, Mrs. Short, Charles Rowe and Norman Campbell all of Jacksonville. The numbers sang were “When They ring Those Golden Bells For You and Me”, “God Shall Wipe Away all Tears” and “Going Down the Valley”. Rev. Walters of the Congregational church at Jacksonville, assisted by Rev. Charles Low, had charge of the services.
Pallbearers acting were Louis Calloway, George Deitrick, James B. Joy, E. T. Antrobus, John Alderson, T. H. Pratt.
Mr. Fox who has spent his entire life on a farm north of Chapin was born in the year 1844. For years he was an active member of the M. E. church and his beautiful character, together with the Christian life that he lived made him one of the most highly respected citizens in this community. His passing has cast a gloom. He leaves many relatives and a host of friends who have grieved over the loss. His wife, Mrs. Maggie Biggers Fox and two sons, George and Paul (?) preceded him.. He leaves three sons, . E. Fox of Chapin, Walter Fox of New York City, and Dr. Fred Fox of Freeburg. Two brothers, Rev. Ezra Fox of Gibson City, Ill., J. Fox of Chapin, two sisters, Mrs. Addie Stevenson, Bozeman, Montana; Mrs. Amanda Green of Kansas City.
Relatives from a distance attending the funeral were Rev. Ezra Fox, mr. and Mrs. Archie Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Fox, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Green, all of Gibson City; Dr. and Mrs. Fred Fox, Freeburg; Walter Fox, New York City; Mr. and Mrs. Harris Robertson, Galva; Mr. and Mrs. Lee Fox, Chicago.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 3 Aug 1927)

GIVENS, W. T., Jr.
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W. T. Givens, Jr., died at the home of his sister, Miss Lizzie Givens, in this city July 11, 1905, at 8:40 o'clock a.m. He was born June 30, 1843, at the old homestead on the brow of the Givens hill, where he lived and grew to manhood with the exception of two years, which the family, in his early childhood, spent in Springfield Ills. In the summer of 1862 he with thousands of others responded to the call for "300,000 more" and at the close of the war came to his home and loved ones. In 1866 he was united in marriage to Miss Emma Kent, of Waverly, who died in North Dakota in the fall of 1895. To them were born five children: W. E., better known as Nick, who died Aug 22, 1894, from wounds received while trying to board a train at Jamestown, N.D.; Hattie, now Mrs. Lee Chilton, of Island Grove, Ill.; Robert Low, deceased; Allie, now Mrs. J. T. Douglas, of South Dakota, and one having died in infancy.
In 1862 he moved to Sedgewick Co., Kan., but in 1877 returned to Illinois. In 1886 he received an appointment from President Cleveland as Indian farmer in N.D. where he has since resided until December last, when he, broken in health, came to his childhood home and friends to die.
As a boy, Tom had many friends, as a man and citizen they numbered no less.
During a meeting at the M. E. church, south, since his return, he sought and found Christ, and at once had his name placed on the church record. This has been a great comfort to him since then and when asked the morning before he died if the way was clear, he replied, with his eyes bright and opened wide, "Oh yes, all the way through, and it will be but a short time." On his last birthday he said "Oh, what a happy birthday it would be if the transfer from earth to glory would only come."
He leaves two daughters, one brother, two sisters, and eight grandchildren with a host of kindred and friends to miss him. He begged that we mourn not for him.
Funeral services were held at the M.E. church, South, Wednesday morning, conducted by Rev. R. J. Watts, presiding elder, with interment in Franklin cemetery.
GIVENS
W. T. Givens, an old and highly respected citizen of this county, died Tuesday morning, July 12th, at the home of his sister, Miss Lizzie Givens, after a lingering illness of several months of a complication of diseases, chief of which was heart trouble. His death has been expected for several weeks, owing to the nature of his trouble, but with a strong constitution and careful nursing his life has been prolonged.
William Thomas Givens was born June 30, 1843, at what is known by everyone as the Givens farm, three miles west of this city. When three years of age his parents moved to Springfield and remained two years, where they conducted a hotel near the corner of Third and Adams streets returning to the farm in 1848.
When the call came for volunteers to go to the front he enlisted in Company H, 101st Ill. Infantry, and served three years as a private. In 1866 he was married to Miss Emma Kent, of this city, who died in 1895. Five children were born to this union, three of whom have since died. Politically Mr. Givens was a democrat and was recognized as a leader of the party in Morgan county. Realizing his sterling value as a citizen, farmer and politician, he was appointed by President Cleveland, in the year 1886, as an instructor to the Indians upon farming in North Dakota. He remained in North Dakota until last December, when he was obliged to surrender all his interests in the north and return home on account of poor health and has gradually declined ever since. He is survived by his two daughters, Mrs. Lee Chilton, of Island Grove and Mrs. J. F. Douglas, of Seim, South Dakota; two sisters, Miss Lizzie Givens and Mrs. M. A. Woodmansee, and one brother Robert S. Givens, of this city.
The funeral was held at the M.E. Church South, of which the deceased was a member, at 10 o'clock Wednesday morning, Presiding Elder Watts, assisted by Rev. C. M. Barton, officiating. The burial took place at the family burying ground near Franklin.
(July 13, 1905)


GOLD, Myron
 (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Friday, May 13, 1932
Aged Civil War Vet Is Called
Myron Gold Died Tuesday Evening at Springfield Hospital at Age of 89 Years
Myron Swift Gold, second son of Sedgewick and Chloe Ann Peet Gold, was born on a farm, four miles east of Waverly, Illinois, December 1, 1842 and died at the Springfield Hospital, Tuesday, May 10, 1932, at the age of 89 years, 5 months and 9 days. He was a descendant of Major Nathan Gold, one of the first settlers of Fairfield, Conn., in the 17th century.
Mr. Gold attended the Waverly Seminary and taught school for a short time.
He, with his older brother and father, entered the service of the Civil War, being a member of Co. G, 101st Infantry. He was taken ill soon after entering service; he spent six weeks in the government hospital, was discharged, then returned home. His brother Henry was accidentally shot by a comrade in camp.
Following the war, Mr. Gold and his father lived together on their farm, his mother having died in his youth, and his younger brother, Edward, being in the East. On this farm Mr. Gold lived his entire life, with the exception of a number of years spent at the home of his uncle, E. C. Peet.
Mr. Gold was a member of the Congregational church in Waverly. He was a conscientious christian in attending the services of the church. Especially did he enjoy the Sabbath School; he was an excellent Bible student.
He was a great lover of music. Even at his advanced age, he enjoyed playing his own accompaniments to the old familiar sacred songs.
Mr. Gold's brother, Edward, of New York, preceded him in death on October 30, 1931. His surviving relatives are his cousins: Charles Peet, of Minneapolis, Minn.; C. E. Peet, of St. Louis, Mo.; and Mrs. Lillie Peet Allen, of Waverly, Illinois.
Funeral services were held at the Congregational church Thursday afternoon, May 12, at 2 o'clock, in charge of Rev. H. C. Munch, pastor of the First M. E. church. Music was furnished by Miss Bertha Parkin and Mrs. F. H. Curtiss, who sang "One Sweetly Solemn Thought", "Nearer My God To Thee", and "In the Garden", with Miss Bess Bradford as accompanist. They also sang "Going Down the Valley" at the cemetery.
The pall bearers were Fred Parkinson, Lester Parkinson, Edgar Mason, Fred File, Earl Bridges and H. E. Deatherage. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Lester Parkinson, Mrs. Spencer Clark, Misses Madge Deatherage, Nannie Meacham, Mildred Rohrer and Erma Mitchell.
Burial was in Waverly cemetery.

GOLDSMITH, John H.  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

ANOTHER PIONEER PASSES AWAY
J. H. Goldsmith, One of Waverly's Respected Citizens Succumbs To Heart Failure
John H. Goldsmith was born February 28th 1839, near Pisgah, Ill., and died at his home in Waverly, Ill., Tuesday, November 14th, 1911, at 1:30 p.m., aged 72 years, 8 months and 14 days. His health had been failing for about a year as a result of heart trouble and only a month ago he was obliged to resign as city clerk on that account. His death came sudden and rather unexpected. He had eaten his dinner as usual and afterward had taken a short walk in the yard, when he returned into the house and remarked that he was feeling badly, and after being assisted to bed, he at once lost consciousness, and lived only a few moments.
He was married in Waverly, Ill., November 7th, 1871, to Miss Nannie B. Morris. To this union were born three sons, as follows: Bert M., born December 13, 1875; Branch P., born November 28, 1880; and George B., born April 25, 1883. The oldest, Bert, died several years ago by drowning in Illinois river. His wife and two sons survive, besides three sisters, Mrs. M. E. Rogers of this city; Miss Ella E. Goldsmith of Chicago; and Mrs. Anna Ainsworth of Havana, Ill.
He united with the First Baptist church in this city in the year 1873, and remained a member until his death.
Mr. Goldsmith ha the distinction of being the first city clerk of Waverly, the election occurring April 16, 1878, upon the city's first adoption, and during his life held four terms as such. His ability in this office was shown by the accurate and straight-forward manner in which he conducted the duties connected with it, and he was recognized as the best clerk the city ever had.
He enlisted in Co. E, 14th Illinois Volunteer Infantry at Petersburg, Illinois, May 25, 1861, as a soldier in the Civil War, and served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner and confined in the famous and horrible Andersonville prison for a period of six months.
The deceased was a man of exceptional ability, talented, a great reader, and unusually versed on the topics of the day. He was an interesting conversant, and took exceeding pleasure in giving information and advice to all who desired. Just a few days before he died he remarked to his wife that he was ready to go and had nothing to regret. He was one of Waverly's pioneers, respected by all its citizens, and his absence from among us will be universally regretted but his memory will ever be cherished.
Funeral services were conducted at the First Baptist church, Thursday, Nov. 16, at 2:30 in the afternoon, Rev. P. H. Aldrich, pastor, delivering the sermon. The funeral ceremonies were under the direction of the two orders of which he was a member.
In his youth he acquired the printer's trade and was employed on the Illinois State Register for several years. He then returned to Waverly and established the "Waverly Times" in the seventies, and a few years later his paper was purchased by M. M. Meacham, Mr. Goldsmith accepting a position with the new proprietor, remaining with him until Mr. Meacham disposed of his interests to Mr. F. B. Ritchie. In the course of several years he took a position with Mr. Ritchie, and from time to time was connected with the paper in a practical and journalistic way up to about nine months ago. "Uncle" John, as the writers best knew him, took special pride in remarking that his was a long and steady record as a printer, having rounded out over 50 years at the trade.
He was Commander of the John W. Ross Post, G. A. R. at the time of his death, and a member of the Modern Woodmen. No. 138.

GRAY, William
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

of Yoeman Neighborhood Dies at Age 91 Years - Born in Ireland
William Gray, a retired farmer and stock raiser of Morgan county, residing three miles northeast of Franklin in the Yoeman neighborhood, died at 3:30 o'clock Monday morning, November 15th, at the age of 91 years.
Mr. Gray was born in Cavan county, Ireland May 30, 1829, the eighth child of Robert and Jane Gray, on the little farm, situated in one of the best counties in Ireland. Mr. Gray grew to manhood, possessing that sturdy vigor peculiar to the Irish people, and to better his condition in life in the spring of 1849 he sailed for America.
Arriving in New York he made his way into the state of Ohio remaining two years. He then plunged farther westward, and settled in Morgan county, Illinois, where he first worked by the month, and also became employed as a school teacher. In 1854 he was united in marriage to Mrs. R. M. E. Stewart of this county. She formerly was a resident of Tennessee. Shortly after the marriage Mr. Gray bought land in Sangamon comprising 70 acres, where he lived seven years, and then moved back to Morgan county on the property he now owns.
Wishing to give his son the advantage of a college education he moved to Lincoln, Logan county, Illinois, where he resided seven years.
In the autumn of 1875 he returned again to Morgan county and settled on the farm property heretofore mentioned, and has become a most extensive land owner.
Three children blessed this union. Albert H. and Nora preceded their father in death. The wife and one son John E. survive him. John E. lives on the home place, having the confidence of the community. He has had several offices, township treasurer, etc.
The decedent was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the Franklin Methodist church. Interment will be in the Franklin cemetery. Friends are requested to omit flowers. Jacksonville, Ill., November 16, 1920

GRAY, William M.
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

Old Veteran Passed Away
William M. Gray, a former resident of Waverly died at his home in Franklin, Monday morning at 10:30 o'clock, at the age of 69 years.
Mr. Gray was a veteran of the Civil War, seeing more than four years service in that conflict. He enlisted while yet in his teens and was mustered out of the service at the close of the war as a First Lieutenant of Infantry.
Mr. Gray is survived by his wife and three of the five children born to him and Mrs. Gray. For over thirty-five years the family lived in the Waverly and Franklin communities, having resided the past four months in Franklin. Mr. Gray was a staunch Christian man and strong in the counsel and work of the church.
The funeral was held Wednesday at 11:30 a..m. in the Baptist church at Franklin. Rev. Asa Stamper of Girard officiating, assisted by Rev. Asher of Jacksonville. Interment was in Franklin cemetery.
(Waverly Journal, Friday, Feb. 28, 1913)


GRIERSON, Benjamin H., Gen.

GEN. GRIERSON DEAD
VALIANT CIVIL WAR LEADER DIES IN MICHIGAN
His Daring Military Achievements Places Him High in Rank of Nation's Warriors Remains Will Be Brought Here For Burial.
A telegram received Friday morning by W. A. Bancroft announced the death of Gen. Benjamin H. Grierson at his summer home in Omena, Mich. The general passed away at 10:32 o'clock Thursday night. For more than a year he had been in failing health and after going to Omena he sustained a fall, which served to hasten the end. The message is, therefore not a surprise as it has been known for several days that his condition has been critical and with the 85 years upon him, it would be impossible for him to long survive. The remains will be brought to this city and are expected to arrive at 3:55 this afternoon over the Alton, accompanied by Mrs. Grierson.
By the death of General Grierson there has been removed from the nation one of the most heroic defenders and Illinois has lost a commander, who in point of daring and initiative, was second only to Gen. U. S. Grant. The Grierson raid will be known as long as history lasts and the splendid courage displayed in and leadership of the grand old veteran will live
through the ages.
General Grierson's life was remarkable in many respects. He gave of his best service to his country at the time of its greatest need. He was a man of excellent habits and good training and was thus enabled to endure great hardships and to give courage to those under his command. In consequence he was a great leader of men and a commander, whose tactics brought results. Since the death of General Grierson there are now surviving only five out of the 133 that were commissioned to the full rank of major general General Stahl and General Sickles of New York, General Dodge of Iowa, General Wilson of Washington, D.C., and Gen. P. J. Austerhouse, who is in Germany.
In Early Life a Musician
The following facts were gleaned from the biography of General Grierson as written by Dr. W. F. Short in his "History of Morgan County:" Benjamin H. Grierson was born July 8, 1826, in Pittsburg, Pa., and was a son of Robert and Mary Grierson, natives of Dublin, Ireland. The family emigrated to this country in 1819, settling at Pittsburg, later removing to Youngstown, Ohio, and thence to Jacksonville, Ill. Benjamin H. pursued a course of study in the high school and academy at Youngstown and passed an examination, which would have entitled him to admission to West Point military academy, but he declined the appointment on account of the opposition of his mother.
During his early years he was engaged in teaching music and still followed this as a profession after coming to Jacksonville in 1851. He possessed musical talent of high order and in early life conducted a noted band and orchestra.
Later he spent some five years in the grain and mercantile business at Meredosia until about the beginning of the civil war, when he returned to Jacksonville.
Answered First Call to Arms.
When president Lincoln issued his first call for troops, young Grierson assisted in recruiting Company I of the Tenth regiment, Illinois volunteer infantry, and on May 8, 1861, joined the army at Cairo, serving for three months without pay as aide on the staff of Gen. B. M. Prentiss, serving with nominal rank lieutenant. He was on duty for a time at Tropton, Mo., and later accompanied Gen. Prentiss on the expedition to Cape Girardeau, Oct. 24, 1861 he was commissioned major of the sixth Illinois cavalry, taking rank from Aug. 28, preceding, but remained on detached service with Gen. Prentiss in northern and central Mis. Until November following, when he joined his regiment at Shawneetown, Ill. He was mustered in with his regiment from Jan. 9, 1862 and started on Feb. 10, with his battalion under ___ ment. He received orders March 25 to proceed to Pittsburgh Landing, but was detained at Paducah by order of Col. Noble, the most commander. Three days later he was chosen Colonel of the regiment to succeed Col. Cavanaugh resigned and in June following was ordered to Memphis, Tenn. On the 19th of that month by a swift dash with 250 men of his regiment and 50 of the eleventh cavalry routed a force of Confederates under Gen. Jeff Thompson at Hernando, Miss., killing and capturing fifteen, besides destroying a large amount of commissary and quartermaster stores, without the loss of a single man. Transferred to Sherman's Command Under the order of Gen. Grant with a part of his regiment, the Fifty-eighth Ohio Infantry, he moved a week later to Germantown, Tenn., where he was soon joined by the Fifty-second Indiana and a section of artillery, from which point important expeditions were made, which led to securing a large number of colored men to work upon fortifications at Memphis. Returning to Memphis, July 18, he was soon transferred to Gen. Sherman's command, under whose instructions he was actively employed for several months scouting in different directions with uniform success.
Mules were obtained, furnishing Gen. Sherman with transportation facilities, enabling him to join Grant's Mississippi expedition. Nov. 26 Col. Grierson left Memphis in advance of Gen. Sherman's corps and for the next fifty days was almost constantly in the saddle, successively under command of Sherman, Grant and McPherson. During this time he made a rapid march from Oxford, Miss., to Helena, Ark., destroying camp equipages, wagons, arms and ammunition, also pursuing Gen. Van Dorn's forces from near Water Valley, Miss., north into Tennessee, and after repulsing that general's attack at Bolivar drove him south of the Tallahatchie.
Prepares For Hazardous Feat.
Col. Grierson was next assigned commander of the First Brigade consisting of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois and Second Iowa calvary, and by order of Gen. Grant reported to Gen. McPherson, then commanding the Seventeenth army corps, of which the cavalry brigade formed the rear guard on the march to LaGrange, Tenn., where it arrived Jan. 14, 1863.
Until April following, the cavalry force was employed in guarding the line of the Memphis & Charleston railroad and scouring the surrounding country. Leaving LaGrange March 8 with 900 men of the Sixth and Seventh Illinois cavalry after a forced march of fifty miles, Col. Grierson attacked the southern forces under Col. Richardson near Covington, Tenn., effecting a complete surprise, routing the enemy with a loss of twenty-two killed and seventy captured, besides the destruction of commissary and quartermaster stores, train, ammunition and military records. Col. Grierson's loss in this expedition was only four men missing. The colonel had now volunteered for the hazardous undertaking and he entered upon one of the most memorable and brilliant expeditions of the war. On April 17, 1863, under orders received from Gen. Grant through Generals Hurlburt and Smith, he left LaGrange, Tenn., with 1,700 men with but three days' rations in their haversacks, and marching south through the entire state of Mississippi, a distance of over 600 miles, sixteen days later arrived at Baton Rouge, La. During the last twenty-eight hours of this raid Col. Grierson's force marched seventy-six miles, had four engagements, destroyed two Confederate camps, captured nearly 100 prisoners and crossed Tickfaw, Amite and Comite rivers.
Expedition Was Successful.
The destruction of sixty miles of railroad and telegraph line, several million dollars in property, besides 100 soldiers killed or wounded and 500 captured and paroled, was the result of this famous expedition. A large number of colored men accompanied Grierson's force to Baton Rouge and immediately mustered into union regiments. Colonel Grierson's entire loss amounted to one officer, one non-commissioned officer and three privates wounded and nine missing.
The expedition proved the confederacy a "mere shell", disconcerted the enemy's plans, scattered and drew their forces from vulnerable points and three them into such confusion as to render them unserviceable and unable to concentrate against General Grant's forces in the movement against Vicksburg. As a consequence over 20,000 southern troops were ordered to different points by Generals Pemberton and Gardner, depleting the strength of the confederate forces at Vicksburg in the vain attempt to capture and destroy Colonel Grierson and his gallant band of audacious raiders from Illinois and proving an important factor in the capture of that southern stronghold three months later. On May 12 following Grierson's command destroyed the railroads and telegraph between Clinton and Port Hudson, La., took part in a number of engagements and patrolled the regions in the vicinity of Port Hudson until its surrender.
Service Recognized.
As a recognition of the services rendered in this remarkable campaign President Lincoln promoted Colonel Grierson to Brigadier General of Volunteers, "for gallant and distinguished service" in his great raid through the heart of the so-called confederacy - his commission bearing the date June 3, 1863, one month before the fall of Vicksburg. General Grierson took an active part in all expeditions from western Tennessee into Mississippi in 1864, made with a view of attracting the attention of the rebel forces and drawing their cavalry from the front and flank of the main army under command of General Sherman during the operations of the latter in middle Tennessee, and especially while General Sherman was concentrating his forces for his famous "march through Georgia." By direction of General Halleck, General Grierson led a rapid and successful cavalry expedition from Memphis, Tenn., in mid-winter - December 1864, and January, 1865 - dealing a destructive blow to the enemy's communications with the south, by destroying railroads, capturing and destroying Hood's army supplies, including ordnance, commissary, medical and quartermaster stores at Verena, Miss., and capturing the rebel fortification and forces at Egypt Station, Miss. Referring to the famous raid of 1863, General Grant stated in writing, now on file in the war department, "General Grierson was the first officer to set the example of what might be done in the interior of the enemy's country without a base from which to draw supplies," and that the mid-
winter "raid of 1864-65" was most important in its results and most successfully executed."
Not Found Wanting.
It is impossible within the limits of this sketch to give a detailed account of even the most important of General Grierson's military achievements during the war period. Suffice to say that, up to the hour of the suppression of the rebellion, he was engaged in a service calling for gallantry, military skill and able leadership and was not found wanting, as shown in the reputation conceded to him in the history of that dramatic period. On February 10, 1865, by direction of President Lincoln, he was assigned to duty with the brevet rank of major-general and ordered to report to General Canby at New Orleans, to take command of a cavalry expedition through Louisiana, Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi.
Returning to New Orleans he organized a cavalry force for service in Texas, and later was in command in northern Alabama with headquarters at Huntsville, where he remained until January 1866, soon after being summoned to Washington to testify before the congressional committee on reconstruction. While there he was promoted to major general of volunteers to rank from May 27, 1865, "for gallant and meritorious service during the war of the rebellion."
At his own request he was honorable mustered out of the volunteer service, April 30, 1866. On the reorganization of the regular army, General Grierson was appointed colonel of the Tenth Regiment U. S. Cavalry, soon thereafter receiving the brevets of brigadier and major-general of U.S. army. He organized his regiment at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., and for nearly
a quarter of a century was actively engaged in scouting and exploring throughout the western states and territories, being almost constantly in the field or at some expose post in the midst of the most savage and warlike Indians of the frontiers.
In this way he tendered service to the government quite as hazardous and important as that rendered during the war of the rebellion. Besides this valuable service at various military posts, he commanded at different times the districts of the Indian Territory and Pecos, Texas; The Department of Texas; the district of New Mexico and the department of Arizona, with headquarters at Los Angeles, Calif. Where he received his appointment as brigadier-general U. S. army, to rank from April 3, 1890. He was retired from active service on July 8 of the same year, since when he has resided at Jacksonville, Ill.
His Family Life.
On Sept. 24, 1854, General Grierson was united in marriage to Alcie Kirk of Youngstown, Ohio, daughter of John and Susan (Bingham) Kirk. She died Aug. 16, 1888. Seven children were born to this union, of whom two daughters and one son are deceased. The surviving sons are as follows: Col. Charles H., U.S.A., a graduate of West Point, now at Fort Ethan Allen, Vt.; Robert K. of Jacksonville, Ill.; Benjamin H., Jr., and George M., who are at Fort Davis, Texas, in the ranch business. On July 28, 1897, he was wedded to Mrs. Lillian King, formerly the wife of Col John W. King and a daughter of Moses G. Atwood of Alton, Ill., who moved from Concord, N. H., in 1837. Mrs. Grierson has one son, Harold Atwood King, general manager of a ranch belonging to General Grierson at Fort Davis, Texas.
In politics General Grierson was a Republican. Immediately on the organization of that party he became actively allied with it, earnestly advocating the election of John C. Fremont for the presidency, and in the campaign of 1856 was one of the very few supporters of Fremont in Meredosia, Morgan county, Ill. In view of the grandly patriotic career of Benjamin H. Grierson words of encomium are superfluous. His deed will speak evermore. They are written in imperishable characters on the scroll of his country's heroes, and form an inseparable part of the nation's history.
(Jacksonville Courier, August 31, 1911)

HAIRGROVE, W. J.
 (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Dies At Age of 87 Years
Former Waverly Citizen Died Early Sunday Morning at Passavant Hospital. Buried in Waverly Tuesday.
W. J. Hairgrove died at Passavant hospital in Jacksonville at 12:45 o'clock Sunday morning at 12:45 o'clock Sunday morning, following an illness of several months duration. William Joseph Hairgrove was the son of William and Sarah Hairgrove, born May 10, 1832, in Troup County, Georgia, near the town of West Point, and died at Passavant hospital in Jacksonville, Illinois, July 27, 1919. He moved with his parents to Morgan county in the year 1842 and on the 27th day of May, 1854 was married to Minerva Jane Whitlock who died May 22, 1916.
There were four children born to them, John Newton of Virden; Chas. Edwin who was killed in a railroad accident in 1892, Elmer Ellsworth of Kansas City, Mo. and William Nichols of Jacksonville, three of which survive.
He served three years in the Civil War, with honorable discharge, having been a volunteer from Morgan county in the 101st Illinois Volunteers. He spent a greater part of his life on a farm near Waverly but moved from it to Waverly in 1884, where he resided until six years ago when he moved to Jacksonville to be with his son, William N. Hairgrove.
Deceased was early connected with the Baptist church, but in his declining years was a member of the M. E. church South.
Three brothers survive him, Columbus of Jacksonville; Francis Marion of Brownsville, Neb. And Henry Clay of Parsons, Kansas.
Funeral services were held at 8:00 o'clock Tuesday morning in the M.E. church South in Waverly, Rev. R. J. Watts officiating. Burial was in East cemetery. (Aug. 1, 1919

HARRIS, James Madison

James M. and Julia Harris Die
Prominent Farmer and Civil War Veteran Succumbs to Stroke on Day of Sister-in-law's Funeral.
Two of this community's well known and highly respected citizens passed away during the past week, Mr. Julia C. Harris succumbing to a lingering illness last Saturday, and her brother-in-law, James M. Harris dying suddenly about 8 o'clock Monday morning. Mr. Harris had not been in good health and at the above mention hour his daughter, Miss Mabel, was awakened and upon going to this room found him breathing his last. He was lying as if asleep and it is supposed he was stricken while sleeping.
James M. Harris
James Madison Harris, son of William P. and Melinda Harris, was born in Macoupin County, Illinois, May 22, 1844, and died at his home in Maxwell, March 31, 1924, at the age of 79 years, 10 months and 9 days.
At the age of twenty-one, he enlisted in Co. I, 17th Illinois Cavalry, and was captured and sent to Andersonville Prison, where he spent eleven months of untold hardships, known only to those who were held prisoners at that place. He was honorably discharged from the army in May 1865, when he returned to his home in Sangamon County.
In the same year, he was married to Mary E. Sturgis, to which union four children were born, three of whom are living, the oldest son, Fred, preceding him in death three years ago. Mr. Harris was a strong advocate of the Republican party, and took active interest in its success. He was a Mason for over fifty years, and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic since its organization.
At an early age he united with the Cumberland Presbyterian church, later transferring his membership to the Congregational church in this city, of which church he was a member at the time of his death.
Deceased is survived by his widow; one son, Thomas Clifton, and two daughters. Mrs. Josie Reynolds and Miss Mabel Harris; also ten grandchildren and thirteen great grandchildren.
(Waverly Journal, April. 4, 1924)

HARRIS, John B.
( Jacksonville East Cemetery)

John B. Harris died at his home in Chicago Thursday. He was stricken with paralysis about a year ago and had been bedfast ever since.
Deceased was born on a farm north of Jacksonville in 1841 and spent the early years of his life in this county.
Twenty-five years ago he removed to Chicago where he has since resided.
When the Civil War was started Mr. Harris enlisted and served during that conflict. His health was broken during his service and he was always ailing since.
He is survived by the following: A. J. Harris of this county; Thomas C. Harris of Pueblo, Colo.; Mrs. Martha J. Berry of Chicago; and Mrs. Martinette Colwell of Ottumwa, Iowa.
Mr. Harris was a member of the Methodist church and of the G. A. R. and was a man highly respected by all who knew him.
The remains will arrive in the city from Chicago this morning at 7 o'clock and will be taken to the undertaking parlors of John G. Reynolds. Funeral services will be held from the parlors of John G. Reynolds. Funeral services will be held from the parlors at 10:30 o'clock in charge of the Rev. G. T. Wetzel. Burial will be in Jacksonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 6 Apr. 1918)

HARRIS, William Henry H.  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

W. H. H. Harris Expires White Sitting in Automobile, Heart Trouble Cause of Death.
William H. H. Harris of Loami died suddenly in his automobile in front of the City hotel in Waverly about noon last Saturday, June 26. Deceased had driven to Waverly in company with two little girls who brought butter and other supplies to the hotel, doing some repair work on his car on the way to town. He talked with Mr. Curtiss, proprietor of the hotel and said he was not feeling well and believed he would rest in his car. About 1 o'clock a member of the band playing at the chautauqua called Mr. Curtiss's attention toHarris and said he believed something was wrong. Mr. Curtiss made an examination and found life was apparently extinct. Dr. Paul Allyn was called and upon his arrival made an examination and pronounced Mr. Harris dead.
Coroner Rose of Jacksonville was notified and immediately came out and held an inquest. The jury was composed of C. C. Courtney, foreman; V. G. Keplinger, H. E. Jolly, Elmer Meacham, W. E. Miller, and W. A. Taylor, clerk. The testimony of Dr. Paul Allyn, Cyrus Curtiss and J. C. Maginn was taken. After hearing the evidence the jury returned a verdict that death was caused by heart trouble. Mr. Harris was 79 years old and was a resident of Loami. For many years he was a citizen of Waverly. After leaving here he became postmaster and proprietor of a store at Maxwell, moving to Loami about a year ago.
He is survived by his wife and two daughters, Mrs. Henry Clark of St. Louis and Mrs. John Stevens of Loami.
Funeral services were held at the M. E. church in Loami Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, in charge of Rev. Mr. Henninger. Interment was in East cemetery at Waverly, the Waverly Masonic lodge being in charge of the services at the grave.
(1920)

HARRISON, William Columbus - (1846-1916)

WILLIAM C. HARRISON CIVIL WAR VETERAN IS DEAD
Long Time Resident Passed Away Saturday - Saw Active Service in the Great War.
William Columbus Harrison, a veteran of the civil war, passed away at his home, 332 East Lafayette avenue, at 12:45 o'clock Saturday morning.
Mr. Harrison was born in Tennessee May 5, 1846 and came to this place with his parents when he was yet a child and for some time has been occupied as drayman. He was the son of Squire Harrison of Tennessee and came of a good family.
He enlisted in Co. C, 64th Infantry at Manchester and saw plenty of hard service. His company had five captains during its existence, G. B. Keasey, John Keasey and Thomas C. Fullerton successively resigned, James H. Yates was mustered out as first lieutenant and Wm. Zewell remained till the end of the unpleasantness. There were also five first lieutenants. Three of these were promoted to the captaincy, one resigned, one was discharged and the other remained till the last. There were also four second lieutenants, two of whom resigned, one was promoted, and one remained till the end.
The regiment saw a deal of hard service from the start to the finish. It was first begun as the First Battalion of Yates' sharpshooters but was increased to a regular regiment. It saw hard service in the region of Corinth and later about Iuka and several other places. The regiment participated in the battle of Resaca and saw a great deal of service in various parts of the south that year. The regiment followed flood on some of his daring exploits and participated in much of the fighting about Atlanta. January, 1865 it was sent to Beaufort, South Carolina, and did a considerable amount of work marching, skirmishing and following up the enemy generally. At Bentonville, the whole regiment was on the skirmish line and took a number of prisoners, losing several killed and wounded. April 10th it arrived at Raleigh and May 24 was in the grand review at Washington and in June, 1865 was mustered out and paid at Chicago.
The regiment lost a number of field officers killed and wounded, while several were promoted to the position of brigadier general. Several resigned from the service and the first sergeant of Co. C deserted.
Mr. Harrison was married to Elizabeth Hart in Missouri, in 1883 and he is survived by his wife, sons, O. R. Harrison of Granite City, A. D. Harrison of Springfield, and John Harrison of Jacksonville. Also one daughter, Mrs. Walter Hart of Jacksonville.
He leaves sisters: Mrs. L. W. Windsor, Jacksonville; Mrs. Mary Drake of Meredosia and one step-daughter, Mrs. Joseph Richards of Ashland. Mr. Harrison was a steady, industrious man and bore a good name among those who knew him best.
The funeral will be conducted at the family residence, 332 East Lafayette avenue, Monday at 2:30, by Rev. G. W. Flagge and interment will be in Jacksonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, March 5, 1916)

HART, Albert
 (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

In Memoriam.
ALBERT HART, youngest son of Leonard and Mary C. Hart, was born in Windsor, Vt., October 14th, 1842. At a very early age the family removed to Cornish, N. H., where they resided until March 1st, 1857, when they emigrated to Cass county, Ills. Here Mr. Hart remained in the family of his father following the pursuits of agriculture, until a few months subsequent to the breaking out of the "Great Rebellion" when he volunteered his services for the suppression of the rebellion. He remained with his company (Co. A, 114th Ill. Inf.) Until the close of the war, being honorably discharged from the army and returning to the peaceful pursuits of home. His father having removed from Cass county to Morgan county during his absence in the army, and settled near Waverly, Mr. Hart came to Waverly; but having contracted a severe disease of the eyes during the latter part of his army career he was for several months confined to a dark room. Faithful treatment enabled him, after several months, to enter into business; and forming a partnership with Mr. Chauncey Lankton in the grocery line he faithfully and energetically pursued this branch of business for more than a year. In the meantime (Oct. 31st, 1867) he was united in marriage with Miss Mattie E. Lacy, who still survives him.
Subsequent to his business pursuit in the grocery line he was actively engaged in various other pursuits, always manifesting the same zeal which characterized him in the last days of his active business life. For more than a year prior to his death he was attached with what he called the "whooping cough," but the progress and final termination of the disease proved the same to have been consumption of the worst type. About the first of May last he started for the south, hoping for a change and improvement in the change of climate. May 10th he reached Clement's Station, Ala. After a hard and wearisome journey of a week or more. The services of a physician of high repute in that section were engaged, but after lingering twenty days, during which time every effort possible was made to stay the ravages of the disease, he quietly passed away to that world where sickness and death are forever unknown. Although Mr. Hart had never made a public profession of religion, his correspondence with his family during his last days, and after his arrival in Alabama, indicate a spirit of calm resignation to the Divine will, a trust in the mercy of God, and a fearlessness of death, such as is realized only by those whose "peace is made with God," and whose "minds are stayed" on Jehovah.
The remains of Mr. Albert Hart, who died on the 30th of last May, in Alabama, arrived here on last Tuesday morning. The body, we are informed, will be kept at his home till Thursday, when it is expected that a funeral sermon will be preached by Rev. M. P. Clark of Carlinville, after which the body will be interred in the east cemetery.
(May 1877)

HART, Thomas Jefferson
 (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Aug. 22, 1902
Thomas Jefferson Hart was born in Hart's Prairie Sept. 22, 1840 and died Aug. 15, 1902 in the 62nd year of his life. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, 22nd regiment of Ill. Vol. Infantry and served three years and at his death was drawing a pension from his grateful government. He was married to Miss Millie E. Dugger Dec. 23, 1864. To this union was born 6 children, 3 boys and 3 girls, 2 of whom died in infancy.
His first wife died Nov. 30, 1874. He was again married in 1875 June 17 to Miss Mary C. Butler. One child was born to this union and died in infancy. He professed faith in Christ in early life and was quite a while identified with the Methodist church, until 1869 he united with the Hart's Prairie Baptist church and became an active member. He was a member of the building committee to erect the house of worship. He was, at the time of his death a trustee for the church property, was the church treasurer, deacon and Messenger elect to represent the church at the annual meeting 3 weeks off. His disease was appendicitis. He was at church a few days before his death. He was only sick six days. We may say of him he was a faithful husband, a devoted father and brother. Our loss in the church and community is simply irreparable. He leaves his faithful wife and four sorrowing children, and 13 grandchildren also three brothers, Wm. in Idaho, Harvey of Edinburgh and J. D., living on the old homestead and a score of other friends and relatives all who knew him to mourn as only the sorely bereaved can mourn. He was also a member of the Grand Army and the remnant of the 32nd was holding their reunion at Scottville only 3 miles away. He died at 7:30 a.m. The funeral was conducted by Elders W. T. Hart and Fitzgerald at the Baptist church Sunday morning to an immense congregation, more than half of which could not get into the church.
Mr. Braker with the choir from the Disciple church furnished the music. Interment at the South cemetery. The floral tributes were numerous. Red Cloud.

HENDERSON, Amos

DEATH COMES TO AMOS HENDERSON COUNTY PIONEER
Veteran Citizen Was Born on Site of Present Opera House - Was Justice of the Peace Thirty-six Years.
Amos Henderson, born more than eighty-five years ago in small dwelling on ground now occupied by Jacksonville's business district, passed away at 8:45 o'clock this morning at his home, 412 East Douglas avenue. He was 85 years, 11 months and 7 days old, and one of the oldest Jacksonville natives.
Mr. Henderson's health had not been good for several days, but he continued his insurance and real estate business until a year and a half ago. For thirty-six years he served as a justice of the peace, so that he became better known to the present generation as Squire Henderson.
The decedent saw Jacksonville grow from a struggling village in the forties to a modern city, with business houses on and surrounding the site of his old home, where the Illinois theatre now stands. His memory was rich with early day happenings in Jacksonville. He could remember of his father telling of the day when Jacksonville was platted for a village.
During his long life, Mr. Henderson practiced law, served as a justice of the peace, ran a store and engaged in insurance and real estate business. For many years he was one of the community's most active and best known citizens.
Mr. Henderson was born here Nov. 20, 1841, the son of Smiley H. and Elizabeth Henderson, natives of Ross county, Ohio, who came to Greene county, Ill., before Morgan county was surveyed. Smiley Henderson passed through Jacksonville in 1826, when this city was being laid out, on his return from the Indian trading post at Beardstown. He purchased the corner lot where the opera house building now stands for the sum of $75.
Read Law With Yates.
Amos Henderson received his education in the public schools, having attended the old Jefferson school when it was housed in a frame building, and subsequently graduated from Berean college, after which he read law for three years with Judge Bordan and Richard Yates.
In July of 1862 Mr. Henderson enlisted in Company D of the 101st Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry.
In that regiment he was engaged mostly in skirmishing. Because of illness he was mustered out in 1864, and later re-enlisted in Company B, 133rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in which he served until the close of the war.
After the war Mr. Henderson returned to Jacksonville and for several years conducted a grocery store and confectionery on the corner of West State street and the square. Later in life he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, and carried on several other lines of endeavors with this work.
Married Sixty-one Years.
On Oct. 28, 1866, he was united in marriage with Emeline Miller, a native of this city. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson were schoolmates at an early age. Mrs. Henderson, who is now past 84 years of age, survives.
The aged couple would have observed their sixty-first wedding anniversary tomorrow.
Mr. Henderson was for a long period of years active in Odd Fellowship. During 1876 he served as Grand Master of the lodge in Illinois.
Besides his wife he leaves one son and one daughter, Herbert Henderson, who is engaged in printing business in Decatur, and Mrs. Ruth DePew, wife of Clarence L. DePew, 412 East Douglas avenue. There is one brother, Smiley Henderson, of California; three grandchildren, Lawrence J. Henderson, Decatur; Mrs. George Stevenson, Urbana, and Miss Marian Miller DePew of New York City.
Funeral services will be held at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the residence on Douglas avenue.
Interment will be made in Diamond Grove Cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 27 Oct. 1927)

HENDERSON, John 
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

John Henderson was born in Marietta, Ohio, in the year 1844, and died at the Soldiers' Home in Quincy, Ill., on Monday, July 1, 1907, at 8 a.m., aged 63 years. He was first married to Miss Kate Pilcher of Athens county, Ohio. To this union two sons were born, Edward, of Chatham, and Frank, of Springfield.
His second marriage was to Miss Sarah Bean, also of Athens county, O., which occurred Feb. 7, 1875, and to this union was born three children, two daughters, dying in infancy, and one son, Robert, who resides with his mother in this city. Deceased is survived by his wife and three sons, also one adopted daughter, Mrs. Walter Luttrell of Prentice.
In 1861 he enlisted as a soldier in Co. B, 36th Ohio, volunteer infantry, and served during the Civil War until honorably discharged in 1865. He had lived in Waverly for many years, and at one time served as city superintendent of streets. He was a charter member of the local G. A. R., and also a member of the M. W. A. of this city.
He had been in failing health for the past three years, and about two years ago went to the Soldiers' and Sailor's Home at Quincy, Ill., where he was tenderly cared for until death came to his relief.
He joined the M. E. church in the year 1877, and remained a member until his death.
Robert Henderson went to Quincy on Tuesday to bring the remains to this city for burial, the body arriving here on Wednesday, via the 7:44 a.m. C. P. & St. L. train, accompanied by the three sons. Funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. at the First M.E. church, conducted by the Rev. C. M. Barton, followed by interment in the East cemetery. (July 5, 1907)


HERALD, A. B. 
(Diamond Grove Cemetery)

A. B. HERALD DEAD AT SON'S HOME
Born in Germany Mr. Herald Fought in Revolution of 1848, Escaping Afterward to America. A. B. Herald, aged 86 years, died at 12 o'clock Thursday night at the home of his son E. D. Herald, 1000 Edgehill Road. He had been in failing health for some time and death was not unexpected. A More extended obituary will appear later.
Funeral arrangements have not been made.
Mr. Herald was born in Germany and it was as a young man of eighteen years that he enlisted in the revolutionary movement of 1848 when the German people, influenced by the republican ideas spread by the French revolution of 1830, rose in strong force and opposed a government which, unrestricted by written constitutions, was growing more and more oppressive. In some of the German states the year 1848 marked the granting of the first constitutions. Mr. Herald fought as a revolutionist in the streets of Berlin and could well recall how cannon were placed in position and how many of his comrades met death when the order came to fire upon the insurrectionary force. Thru the secret kindness of a German official, Mr. Herald was enabled to make his way, unmolested, to America.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Friday, January 12, 1917)
"Herald"
Funeral services for A. B. Herald were held Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the residence of E. D. Herald, 1000 Edge Hill road in charge of the Rev. F. B. Madden, pastor of Grace M. E. church. Mrs. James Mahon gave two solo selections to piano accompaniment by Miss Geraldine Sieber. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. W. T. Clarkson, Mrs. T. A. Ebrey, Mrs. G. A. Sieber and Miss Marion Fairbank.
Burial was made in Diamond Grove Cemetery. The bearers were Capt. W. A. Kirby, J. J. Reeve, E. A. Hearn, J. I. Graham, M. E. Gilbert and W. T. Clarkson.
Mr. Herald was born in Saxony, Germany, May 16, 1830, and came to this country as a young man and soon after the outbreak of the Civil War enlisted in Co. C of the 101st Illinois Infantry. Surviving Mr. Herald are the widow and five children, Fred C. Herald of Peoria, Edward D. Herald, Mrs. Agnes Hart and Charles F. Herald, Jacksonville, and W. H.
Herald. (Jacksonville Daily Journal, January 16, 1917)



HICKMAN, John Thomas

John Thomas Hickman, an old resident of this city died at Our Savior's hospital Sunday morning at 5:50 o'clock.
Deceased was born May 26, 1836, and was the son of John T. and Rebecca Crum Hickman. He was a member of Central Christian church and of Matt Starr post G. A. R. He followed the occupation of farming for many years and was highly respected in the community in which he lived. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. Noah Brown of Sinclair.
He also leaves one grandson, Emmett H. Brown and three brothers, James Hickman, of Cox Creek, Ky., Walter Hickman of Gainesville, Texas, and Rufus Hickman of Whitesborough, Texas. Funeral services will be held from Hebron church this afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of the Rev. Mr. Wetzel.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, July 3, 1917)
Hickman.
Funeral services for John Hickman were held from Hebron church Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of the Rev. G. T. Wetzel. Music was burnished by the church choir. The flowers were cared for by Anna Mail Wilson, Laura Fox and Eunice Hopper. Burial was in Hebron cemetery the bearers being, James Wilson, Newton Wilson, Albert Hopper, William Hopper, Richard Ogle and Morris Jumper.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, July 4, 1918)


HILLERBY, George - (1836-1916)

GEORGE HILLERBY FORMER RESIDENT DIED TUESDAY
Deceased Who Was Eighty Years Old Spent Much of Life Here - Active in Christian Church Work.
George Hillerby, who was for a great many years a resident of Jacksonville, died Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at his home in Springfield. During his long residence in Jacksonville, Mr. Hillerby was very active in the work of the Christian church and when he removed to Springfield his church activities were conducted in his new home city.
The deceased was born in 1836 in Yorkshire, England, and came to America in 1857. For a short period he was a resident of Lynnville and then came to Jacksonville, residing here until 1909, when he removed to Springfield. He was a veteran of the Civil war, having served with the 145th Illinois Infantry. He was also a member of Illini lodge No. 4, I. O. O. F., and had the record of fifty years in Odd Fellowship. For thirty years he was a member of the board of elders of the Christian Church of Jacksonville and following his removal to Springfield, because of his great popularity as a Christian worker, he was immediately elected an elder in the Springfield church. Mr. Hillerby was married in 1865 to Miss Betty Groen, whose death occurred in 1886. Two years later he was married to Miss Mary Fleming of this city, who survives him. He also leaves his aged brother, Rev. J. P. Hillerby, of this city, one nephew and two nieces.
As a Jacksonville business man and as an active church worker here Mr. Hillerby held a high place in the estimate of his fellow citizens. He was not ostentatious in his Christianity but so lived that men and women who met him instinctively knew that he lived an earnest sincere Christianity. During the long years of his life he was active in good works and the influence of his life will long remain a fragrant memory. Altho Mr. Hillerby had been in feeble health for two years, due to the infirmities of age, he was here July 4 with his wife, Dr. and Mrs. G. A. Hulett and Mrs. Lizzie Henke of Springfield to attend a family gathering at the home of the Hulett sisters north of the city. A number of his Jacksonville friends greeted him at that time and while there realized in a measure his weakened condition, they had no thought that the end of his useful life journey was so nearly at an end. The funeral services will be held in Central Christian church in this city at 2:30 p.m. Thursday.
(Jacksonville Journal, August 9, 1916)

HOBAKER, David
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

David Hobaker was born in Wesenburg, Germany, Dec. 25, 1834, and died at his home in Franklin, Ill., Oct. 7, 1903, aged 68 yrs. 9 mo. 12 da. He came to the United States in 1854, locating and living in Virginia for two years, when he came to Morgan county, Ill., settling near Murrayville. In 1859 he was converted and joined the Bethel M.E. church and lived a consistent christian to the time of his death. On Feb. 21, 1860, he was married to Miss Lucy Crumpler, who survives him. Nine children were born in the home of this husband and wife, two of them dying in infancy. The surviving children are Mrs. J.H. DeLong, of Mud Prairie, Wm. Of California, who could not reach here in time for the funeral, Mrs. Henry Jones, of
Franklin, Mrs. Curtiss Cook, of Indian Territory, who could not come on account of sickness in her family, Lewis, whose whereabouts are not definitely known, John, who lives in Peoria and Mrs. J. W. Henniger, of Springfield.
Mr. Hobaker had no relatives in the country of his adoption, in whose services he enlisted in the 2nd Illinois Light artillery, in 1861, and in whose services he continued as a soldier until honorably discharged in 1864. In 1884 he moved to the vicinity of Franklin and has lived there and hear Waverly ever since. For about ten years he had been failing in health and for the last two or three years had been quite feeble. He was a true christian who met the last enemy with a shout of triumph and a song of victory, and who has left to his family, for their comfort, what is worth more than stocks and bonds and houses and lands - the example of an upright godly life. He has taken with him the only good thing, which anyone can take from this world, a christian character.
The funeral was conducted from the M.E. church in Franklin, Thursday afternoon in charge of the pastor, Rev. M.L. Browning, and was largely attended, the deceased having been well liked and respected by all. Interment was made in the Franklin cemetery. The pall bearers were H. G. Keplinger, Jno. Whitlock, M. F. Short, W. N. Criswell, Chamberlain Belk and Philo Barto.
(Oct. 16, 1903)


HOCKING, Alfred H.

WITH SOLEMN CEREMONIES

The Funeral of the Late A. H. Hocking Largely Attended Wednesday.
The popularity of the late proprietor of the New Pittsfield House, Col. A. H. Hocking, whose funeral occurred here Wednesday, was amply attested by the large crowd of friends who came to the house of Mrs. Burridge, on West Court street, to see the last sad rites performed over his dead body. The funeral party arrived from Pittsfield on the morning train from the west and were met by a number of Jacksonville gentlemen, former friends of the deceased. Among the visitors who came to do honor to the memory of him, whose enthusiasm and public spirit have done so much for Pike county's capital, were Judge Edw. Doocey, Samuel Hirsheimer, Attorney J. G. Cummings, J. F. Stobie, Wm. Pringle, Geo. Groves, J. M. Bush, Jr., the editor of the Democrat, J. D. Hirsheimer, Jas. H. Crane, Simeon Fender, Jacob Windmiller and C. R. Lame.
At nine o'clock the residence of his mother, Mrs. Burridge, was filled with friends. Rev. Father Brady, and Father Miles Sweeney conducted the solemn burial service, and at his close the bearers, Judge Doocey, J. G. Cummings, Wm. Pringle, J. M. Bush, Jr., Jas. H. Crane and Sheriff Jacob Windmiller, carried the coffin to the hearse. Behind them followed the honorary pall bearers, John Loomis, H. O. Cassell, W. H. Corcoran, Chas. Degen, Matt Miller, E. C. Vickery, Dan'l Williams and John R. Knollenberg. The remains were interred in the Catholic Cemetery, the deceased having before his death connected himself with that church.
No greater testimonial of the popularity of the deceased in the town which he adopted as a home could have been given than was paid by the Pittsfield delegation in their presence. And it was deserved, for during Mr. Hocking's few years in that city he had made great changes in the hotel of which he was the lessee, and all of them for the city's good. He had gained the confidence and esteem of the people so thoroughly that they had made him one of the city officials, and there was no one who might be considered his enemy. His wife, and his son-in-law, Mr. Ed. Stokes, of the National Hotel, Peoria, will continue to run the hotel in Pittsfield. (3 July 1890)
Death of A. H. Hocking
A. H. Hocking for many years a resident of this city, died in Pittsfield yesterday. Mr. Hocking was widely known as the proprietor years ago of the Southern Hotel on College avenue. For several years he has been proprietor of the New Pittsfield House of Pittsfield. He had just completed extensive improvements of the house and gotten it in splendid condition. During his residence in Pittsfield he had become one of its most enterprising citizens and his loss will be deeply felt in that community amongst business men. A telegram received Monday morning was the first announcement of his sickness which was typhoid fever and heart disease. His mother, Mrs. Burridge, went over on the freight train Sunday, and is expected home with his body today. The notice of Mr. Hockings' funeral will be announced hereafter. (1 July 1890)

HODGERSON, Y. M.
 (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Y. M. Hodgerson was born in Sangamon county, Ill., Jan. 25, 1839, and died Feb. 19, 1908, making him 69 years and 22 days old.
He was first married to Miss M. E. Park, Oct. 18, 1860, who died Oct. 1, 1861. July 18, 1863, he was again married to Almira McClane, who survives him. To this union, were born four children; a son S. T. Hodgerson, born May 23, 1864, died July 15 of the same year. A daughter, A. L. born Feb. 14, 1866 and died Dec. 14, 1893, at the age of 27 years; leaving two sons, Clarence and Earl Coons. Lennie and Will Hodgerson with the two grandsons survive. Bro. Hodgerson became a Christian when a young man and united with the Presbyterian church, but soon after the second marriage in 1863, united with the Baptist church and lived a faithful and consistent Christian until death called him to his reward. He served in the office of deacon of his church about fifteen years, and was senior deacon at the time of his death.
As a soldier of his country, he enlisted at Loami, as a private in Company F, 10th Illinois cavalry, Oct. 18, 1861, and was discharged June 28, 1862, for disability. Besides his immediate family, he leaves two brothers, Geo. Hodgerson of Virden, and Anderson Hodgerson of New Berlin; three sisters, Margaret Liston of Commerce, Texas, Martha Buchanan, Muskogee, Okla., and Nancy Matthews, Maxwell, Ill., who mourn his departure. Two brothers and two sisters preceded him in death. He leaves many other relatives and friends to mourn their loss. Funeral services were held at the Baptist church last Friday afternoon at one o'clock, Rev. G. W. Claxon, pastor of the church officiating and interment in East Cemetery.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to extend our most heartfelt thanks to the friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and in the time of death of our dear husband and father. Mrs. Almira Hodgerson and children. (Feb. 28, 1908)

HOLMES, George T.
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Thursday, August 28, 1902
Enterprise, Vol. 15, No. 37
Another Old Citizen Dead.
George T. Holmes, a Veteran of the Civil War, Expires Very Suddenly Last Saturday Morning.
At an early hour last Saturday Mr. George T. Holmes, an old and highly respected citizen of Waverly, died at his home in the west end of the city. He had been in feeble health for some time, and while all realized that his condition was critical none realized that death was so near at hand, and the news of his demise came as a shock to the community where he had for nearly half a century lived an honorable and upright life. He had arisen that morning, dressed himself and walked out for a little exercise, and returning to his room had lain down on his bed to rest while the family were preparing breakfast. That hour having arrived one of the children went to his room to summon him to his morning meal, but Death had entered the home and claimed the father as its own.
George Thomas Holmes was born in East Tennessee, near Knoxville, on April 7, 1829, and died at his home in Waverly on Saturday, Aug. 23, 1902, aged 73 years, 4 months and 16 days. On April 4, 1852, he was united in marriage to Miss Minerva Taylor, and the following year (1853) moved to Illinois and settled in Waverly, where he has since resided. To this marriage was born ten children, two of whom are dead. An aged wife, eight children, twenty grandchildren and fifteen great grandchildren, all of whom were present at the funeral with the exception of one son in Kansas, whom sickness prevented from attending.
In 1859 Mr. Holmes made a profession of religion at the Brush College Methodist Episcopal church, six miles south of Waverly. The sincerity of this profession has never wavered as proven by his everyday life. He was conscientiously honest in his dealings with his fellow men and leaves many friends behind as witnesses to the integrity of his character.
He was a good soldier, too, having made an honorable military record as a member of Company M, in the Thirteenth Illinois cavalry, which regiment he joined Feb. 11, 1862, and remained with it until he was honorably mustered out Feb. 16, 1865. As a comrade in his company said: "Tom never shirked his duty or lagged behind when danger was in front." No grander epitaph could be written.
At 2:30 p.m. Sunday the body was taken from the family residence to the First Methodist Episcopal church, under escort of John W. Ross post No. 331, G. A. R., where impressive services were held by the Rev. D. T. Black, pastor of the church, assisted by the Revs. Watts and Droke. From the church the remains were escorted to East cemetery by the G. A. R., where the body was laid to rest with the ritualistic ceremony of that order, in the presence of a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends.
The pall bearers were F. H. Wemple, John W. Luttrell, William T. Osborn, Young M. Hodgerson, John M. Criswell and Patrick Kehoe, all Grand Army comrades.

HOPPER, Hassell 
(Diamond Grove Cemetery)

FUNERAL SERVICES HELD FOR HASSELL HOPPER
Many Friends Assembled at Home For Last Solemn Rites - Mr. Madden Told of Long and Useful Life. Funeral services for Hassell Hopper were held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the family home, 641 South Diamond Street, the Rev. F. B. Madden, pastor of Grace M. E. church, was in charge and he was assisted by the Rev. M. L. Pontius, pastor of the Christian church. Mrs. H. C. Woltman gave appropriate solo numbers to accompaniment of Mrs. Lucy D. Kolp. The floral gifts, brought in beautiful profusion, were cared for by Mrs. Charles Minter, Miss Emma Hunter, Mrs. Alma Chrisman, Miss Anna May Wilson and Miss Nell Hopper.
Burial was made in Diamond Grove cemetery. Matt Starr post G. A. R. were present and conducted the services at the grave. The bearers were Thomas Fox, James Wilson, William Hopper, Robert Hopper, Thomas V. Hopper and Thomas Elsome.
Of Sturdy English Ancestry.
“The life of our departed brother”, said Mr. Madden, in the course of an obituary sketch, “was a link in that chain of Anglo-Saxon humanity which binds together two continents and two countries. Hassell Hopper was born on the 22nd day of February, 1840, at Scarborough, England. The home of his great grandfather was one of John Wesley's regular preaching places in the days when Methodists were without a home, and had no places of worship even in England.
When no preacher was present this good man would enter the pulpit that his own hands had made and officiate as a local minister. Mr. Hopper's grandfather was a prosperous farmer and his father was a well-to-do butcher. His parents, Thomas and Jane Poad Hopper, belonged to the sturdy English yeomen and were staunch Methodists. “In the beginning days of Wesleyan Methodism converts received the sacrament at the hands of the clergy of the church of England. Hassell Hopper was the first of his father's children to be baptized by a Methodist minister.
Early Religious Influence
“Born of such noble ancestry, Mr. Hopper spent a happy childhood amid the beautiful rural scenes of 'Merrie England,' and in the religious atmosphere created by the great Wesleyan revival. At the age of sixteen he came with his parents to America. Immediately on reaching this country the parents brought the family of eleven children and settled on a farm in the neighborhood of Sinclair. Mr. Madden continued with an account of Mr. Hopper's military career and his life as a soldier for three eventful years.
At the battle of Resaca Mr. Hopper received a wound in the knee and the next day while on a forced march, with his would still bleeding, he suffered a sun stroke. Left with impaired health he was taken prisoner but was soon exchanged and granted a brief parole. He never lost interest in the comradeship of the army and was an active and honored member of Matt Starr post G. A. R.
The sketch was continued: “After return from the army Mr. Hopper was a member for nearly twelve years of the firm of Lambert and Hopper and later bought a farm near Sinclair, where he lived for several years. When he came again in Jacksonville Mr. Hopper became associated with his brother, Charles Hopper, in the shoe business. A few years ago he retired from active business life and has enjoyed the well earned recompense of days well spent in useful endeavor.”
Life Its Own Eulogy.
In conclusion Mr. Madden said: “His beautiful life, with its pleasant memories and hallowed influence, is its own eloquent eulogy. This is the priceless legacy of his widow and his children. Theirs also is the sympathy and appreciation of the church and community. May our Heavenly Father stimulate us to emulate his virtues and to press the battle of righteousness to the gates of the evening in the valiant spirit of our fallen comrade.
“However it be, it seem to me,
'Tis only noble to be good,
Kind hearts are more than coronets
And simple faith than Norman blood.”

HOWE, Daniel W.

DANIEL W. HOWE FUNERAL TO BE HELD TOMORROW
Funeral services for Daniel W. Howe, Civil War veteran and one of Jacksonville's oldest business men, will be held at 10:30 o'clock Tuesday morning at the Gillham Funeral Home. Rev. J. F. Langton of Trinity Episcopal church will officiate, and internment will be made in Jacksonville cemetery.
Mr. Howe's death occurred at 12:03 o'clock Sunday morning at the home of his son, Edward J. Howe, 749 East Chambers street. He had been in failing health since Sept. 8, 1926 when he was forced from his home on South Clay avenue by the flood waters. Since that time he had been at the residence of his son.
Mr. Howe was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, June 7, 1841. At an early age he removed from the East to Iowa, where he resided for a few months before coming to Jacksonville. For more than 65 years Mr. Howe was proprietor of a grocery store at 477 South Clay avenue, his success there being evidenced by the faith his customers had for him.
During the Civil War the decedent served with Company #, 210st Pennsylvania regiment, and was a member of Matt Starr, Post of the G. A. R.
He was married when a young man, his wife preceding him in death August 23, 1914. Surviving are five sons, W. G. Howe, D. M. Howe and E. J. Howe all of this city; A. F. Howe of St. Louis and Ralph Howe of Torrence, Calif. There is one sister, Mrs. Sarah Summers of Montalto, Pa. He was a member of the Episcopal church.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 24 Jan 1927)


HOWELL, Pierson
 (Diamond Grove Cemetery)

PIERSON HOWELL DIED SUDDENLY YESTERDAY.

Was Found Unconscious In a Shed in the Rear of His Residence - Death Occurred Before Arrival of Physician

- Coroner Rose Held Inquest.
Pierson Howell, one of the city's best known citizens, died suddenly at his home, 428 South Mauvaisterre street early Monday morning. Mr. Howell had been complaining for several days. Monday morning he went to a shed in the rear of his residence. When he did not return his stepdaughter went to look for him and found him in an unconscious condition. Before a physician could be summoned he was dead.
Circumstances surrounding his death were such that Coroner Rose was notified and empaneled a jury and held an inquest. The jury was composed of D. T. Heimlich, foreman; J. F. Farra, F. J. Blackburn, Isaac G. Lazenby, B. C. Lair and Keith Montgomery, Clerk.
The testimony of Dr. P. C. Thompson, who was Mr. Howell's physician, and Harold J. Johnson was heard. Dr. Thompson testified as to the deceased calling him last week and complaining of a pain in the left side. Witnesses said he made an examination which revealed arterio sclerosis. Dr. Thompson gave as his opinion that death was caused by angina pectoris.
The testimony of Mr. Johnson did not throw any light on the matter. He told of being summoned by telephone from his residence, 1239 South East street to the residence of Mrs. Brown where he found Mr. Howell in an unconscious condition. He summoned Dr. Thompson who pronounced Mr. Howell dead upon his arrival. After hearing the testimony the jury returned a verdict that death resulted from angina pectoris.
Pierson Howell was the son of Abner and Anna Chandler Howell and was born in Newark, N. J., March 4, 1846. He came to Illinois early in life and for many years has been a resident of Jacksonville. He was united in marriage in Springfield in 1868 to Mrs. Mary Thompson who survives him together with one stepdaughter, Mrs. Edward Brown of 428 South Mauvaisterre street. He also leaves one sister, Mrs. Anna Cramer of Morristown, N.J., and two granddaughters, Mrs. A. R. Porter of Toronto, Can., and Miss Ruth Brown of this city.
Mr. Howell was a tinner by trade and was one of the best known men in that trade in the city. He was for many years in the employ of the late Irving Clement and in recent years has been employed by the George S. Gay Hardware company.
He was a member of the Odd Fellows. Mr. Howell served in the 133rd Ill. Infantry in the Civil war and was a member of Matt Starr Post, G. A. R.
Funeral services will be held from 428 South Mauvaisterre street Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock with burial in Diamond Grove cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Tuesday Morning, November 13, 1917)

HUDSON, Frank M.  
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Frank M. Hudson was born in Loami township, Sangamon county, Illinois, November 14, 1842, and died at his home in this city Wednesday evening, July 24, 1907, after an illness covering a period of nearly two years, although his ailment did not assume an acute form until a few months before his death. On Feb. 18, 1880, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Tait of Decatur, Illinois. Three children were born to this union, two daughters and one son - one, the youngest daughter, dying about thirteen years ago. The
surviving children, with their mother, are Jennie and Murray.
For many years Mr. Hudson was a prominent school teacher in Sangamon county, besides serving the county in an official capacity as coroner, and again as a deputy sheriff. About thirteen years ago the family moved to this city making it their home. Mr. Hudson lived a retired life among us until a few years ago, when he was elected a justice of the peace for the city. At the expiration of his term he was re-elected to serve his second term at the time death removed him. He was of a generous and genial disposition, and made friends of all with whom he came in contact. In addition to his family, Mr. Hudson is survived by one sister, Mrs. Rachel Meacham, of this city, and Mr. Andrew Hudson of Loami township.
Funeral services were held at the family home at 2 p.m. Friday, July 26th. Elder J. A. Conlee officiating. Interment was made in East cemetery.
CARD OF THANKS
To all those who so kindly and willingly assisted us during the long illness and death of our dear husband and father, we extend our heartfelt thanks. Margaret Hudson, Jennie & Murray.


HUGHES, Blair M.  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Death of Blair M. HUGHES
Enterprise, March 9, 1905
Our people grieved last Monday on learning of the death of their old and esteemed townsman and friend, B. M. Hughes, which occurred the day before at the Soldier's Home in Quincy, after an illness of two weeks from disease of the bladder, after a second operation had been performed in hopes that he might recover. The news of his death came as a shock and a surprise, as our citizens had not even heard that he was ill.
The remains arrived in this city on Tuesday and were removed to Christopher's undertaking parlors to await burial. Wednesday, March 8, at 10 a.m. John W. Ross Post, No. 331, of this city, of which he was a charter member, took charge of the remains and conveyed them to East Cemetery for interment. Ritual services at the grave were conducted by Post Commander J. M. Joy and the handful of surviving comrades, and after appropriate songs and prayers were offered in honor of the fallen hero who has joined the ranks above, and in admonition to the living, the ashes of B. M. Hughes was left to repose in rest and peace with its Maker.
His life form infancy was spent in Waverly, where he was honored and respected. He was 64 years of age, and was a veteran of the civil and Spanish-American wars, in the latter stationed at Chattanooga as wagon master. In 1899 he entered the Soldiers' Home. He enlisted in the civil war May 25, 1861, in Co. I, 14th Ill. Infantry; Geo. Palmer's regiment and was discharged at Springfield June 24, 1864.
He is survived by three sisters, Misses Estella M. and Mary Hughes, both of Bloomington; a widowed sister, Mrs. Lizzie Clark of Wisconsin, and Henry Hughes of this city.


HURST, James S.  
submitted by Mike Seastedt, 1048 N. Broad St Galesburg 61401 (great grandson of James S. Hurst)

James S. Hurst, Veteran Of Civil War, Is Summoned

Jacksonville Daily Journal May 21st, 1929

James S. Hurst, Sr., civil war veteran and lifelong resident of Jacksonville, passed away at 3:30 p.m. yesterday, at the residence of his granddaughter Mrs. Eyre 515 N. Diamond street. He had been in failing health for several months and his death was not unexpected.
Mr. Hurst was born in Kentucky February 2nd, 1846, the son of James Sander Hurst and Mary Payne Hurst. The family removed to Jacksonville some two years later, purchased a residence on East State Street, where Our Saviour’s Hospital now stands, next door to Richard Yates, the war governor.
The two families were friends such as neighbors usually were in those days and Mr. Hurst enjoyed telling intimate reminiscences of our much beloved wartime governor.
Mr. Hurst’s father was a carpenter contractor and among the older buildings of Jacksonville built by him was the first Illinois Women’s college building.
During the civil war Mr. Hurst served with Company A, .68th regiment, Illinois infantry.
On being mustered out of the army at the close of the war he elected to learn the trade of harness maker. which he did, serving under the late M.D.
Rapp, whose sons are still in the harness business in the same location.
Mr. Hurst was elected city marshall in 1873, serving two years, was on the police force after his term expired, and was reelected city marshall in 1878.
He later served chief of police under Mayor Widmayer, 1891 and 92, and another term under Mayor Holly in 1893, 94, and again under Mayor Widmayer, his second term in 1907 and 1908.
Practically all his life he was much interested in politics and an ardent advocate of the principles of the Democratic Party. His quiet, unassuming disposition made him many fiends. A tribute to his character is the fact that the friends of his boyhood were still his best friend in his old age. He was a member of the Church of Our Saviour.
Mr. Hurst had three sisters and one brother who preceded him in death. He left to mourn him three sons and one daughter. James A. Hurst of Jacksonville, William Hurst of Chicago, George Hurst of Jacksonville, and Mrs. Charles Corrington, of Jacksonville. Also five grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, and one sister, Mrs. George Hoover, living at 316 E. Beecher, Jacksonville, Ill.
Funeral arrangements will be announced later.

HURT, Charles 
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Charles Hurt, for many years a resident of this city, but for the past year or two a resident of Springfield, died at his home in that city at an early hour last Saturday morning. He had been suffering for some time with asthma, and relatives watching at his bedside left him about midnight Friday night apparently resting easy. Early Saturday morning, on going to his room, he was found lying dead on his bed. His death came as a surprise as it was not thought that he was dangerously ill. "Uncle" Charlie, as he was familiarly known in this city was a native of Kentucky, and was about 76 years of age when he died. He came to Illinois fifty years ago and had lived in Waverly most of that time. He was a veteran of the civil war, enlisting in Co. G., 101st Illinois Volunteers in this city. He is survived by one son, Seth, of Springfield. His remains were brought here last Sabbath on the 3:50 p.m. train from Springfield, accompanied by a few relatives, and taken to the East cemetery and placed near those of his wife, who had preceded him to the grave a few years ago. Short services were held at the grave by Rev. C. M. Barton of this city. He was buried by the local Grand Army post.
(June 1, 1906)


HUTCHISON, J. M.  
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Honored Citizen Dies Suddenly
J. M. Hutchison Who Spent His Entire Life Here, Dies at the Age of 84 YearsWaverly lost from its midst this week an old and honored citizen, one who not only spent his entire life here, but more than the life of the town itself, as he was born in 1830 on a farm just south of the present location of Waverly. Mr. Hutchison's death came suddenly, following a few hours illness Wednesday, it not being realized that his condition was serious until the end came.
Though having slight pains in the chest for two or three days little was thought of it, and Wednesday morning, Mr. Hutchison in company with Dr. Hughes, Edwin Batty and A. W. Reagel went to Dr. Hughes' orchard west of town. He became sick while there and was brought back to town, reaching home shortly before noon. He was unable to lie down owing to difficulty of breathing but did not seem to be sick while sitting or walking around the house except for the pain in his chest. He ate a very hearty dinner considering his condition and again attempted to lie down but had to get up in order to get his breath. About four o'clock he suddenly grew worse, became unconscious and died about half past four. John Miller, son of James and Aletha Hutchison was born in Waverly, Illinois, December 3, 1830 and departed this life at his home in this city October 6, 1915 at the age of 84 years 9 months and 3 days. He was one of a family of eight children: two sisters, Mrs. Mary Meacham and Mrs. Margaret McVey, and three brothers, William Joseph and David preceded him to his heavenly home.
He was converted at the age of seventeen years and joined the First M. E. church in this city and was a member at the time of his death.
He has always been an active member of the church and was always to be found in his place in the Sunday school, prayer meeting and preaching services, both morning and evening.
Mr. Hutchison was united in marriage to Mary Seymour of Franklin, December 28, 1849. She departed this life November 30, 1911.
To this union were born seven children. Mrs. Jane Church, the eldest, departed this life April 6, 1896. He is survived by the following children: Mrs. R. J. Moulton of Minneapolis, Minn.; Mrs. C. E. Peet of St. Louis; J. O. Hutchison, of Chicago; Mrs. Julia Harris, Mrs. Leona Jasper and Mrs. B. Reinbach of this city. Besides his children he has raised from infancy his granddaughter, Ouida White.
Also fourteen grand children, fourteen great grandchildren, his half sister, Mrs. C. F. Meacham and half brother S. H. Hutchison of Farmersville are left to mourn his loss.
He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Masonic lodge.
A loved one from us is gone,
A voice we love is still
A place is vacant in our home,
Which never can be filled."
Funeral services will be held at the First M.E. church Sunday, October 10th, at 1 o'clock p.m.

JACKSON, Charles

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIES
Charles Jackson, Born in Slavery, Escaped and Joined Union Army, Died at Age of 86.
Charles Jackson, an aged resident of this city, died at his home Monday night, following an illness of only a few days, he having sustained a fall Thursday of last week while mowing the grass at his home.
Deceased was born in Columbia, Mo., January 1, 1844, the son of John Elisha and Caroline Jackson, the second oldest of 16 children. Having been born in slavery, he ran away at an early age and enlisted in the Civil war, where he served for one year and nine months. After being honorably discharged in St. Louis, he went to Alton and worked for James Godfrey for some time.
He was united in marriage to Elizabeth Harris, at Alton, in 1869. To this union were born six sons and one daughter: Charles, who passed away in 1917,; Fred B., who died in 1926, and Walter, in 1921, and Thomas, Bert and Elizabeth, all of whom died in infancy; and Squire, who resides in Chicago.
About 1870 Mr. Jackson moved to Waverly and went to work for Fred and Augustine Curtiss, in whose employ he continued for 35 years. He has succeeded in creating friendship with all he met.
In early life he professed religion, and was baptized and united with the Waverly Baptist church, in which church he always lived an earnest, Christian life.
His wife having passed away in 1890, he was again married, in 1898, to Mrs. Maggie Watkins, of Peoria. They lived a very happy life until 1924, when she died in Webster, Wis., where they had lived for several years on a farm.
Growing almost to old for farming, Mr. Jackson returned to Waverly, where he has since resided.
In 1925 he was married to Mrs. Ella Porter, of Chicago, who survives him. Mr. Jackson was an honest, conscientious man, and a Christian gentleman. Everyone who knew him had nothing but words of praise. He was a faithful member of John W. Ross Post No. 331, of Waverly, and was always delighted to meet and greet his former comrades.
He is survived by his widow, one son, Squire, of Chicago; two brothers, Dudley, of this city, and William, of Chicago, a step-son and step-daughter, and a host of friends.
Funeral services were held at the Baptist church Thursday afternoon, September 18, at 2 o'clock, in charge of Rev. H. C. Munch, pastor of the First M. E. church, and Rev. J. E. Curry.
The pall bearers were Walter Dikis, Harry Hobaker, Lester Davenport, Hampton Shekelton, Ollie McMahan, and R. S. Strawn. Honorary pall bearers were John Maginn and John Criswell, the two remaining members of the John W. Ross Post.
A quartet composed of Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. F. S. Dennis, Ray C. Mitchell and W. R. Turnbull sang "Face to Face", "The Old Rugged Cross" and "The City Foursquare", with Miss Stella Rodgers as accompanist.
Military services were conducted by the members of the American Legion post, who were in attendance at the funeral.
Burial was in Waverly cemetery. (September 19, 1930)


JOHNSON, Lewis -
(Jacksonville East Cemetery)

Lewis Johnson died at his home, 1435 East Railroad street, Tuesday morning at 4 o'clock. Deceased was born in Missouri June 1, 1846. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary Derixson at Springfield, Ill., July 1, 1871. He had been a resident of Illinois for fifty years and had been resident in Jacksonville for many years. He is survived by his widow
and one sister, Mrs. Lucy Taylor, of Kansas City, Mo. Mr. Johnson was a member of Bethel A. M. E. church and was a man highly regarded by all. He was a veteran of the Civil war. The remains were removed to Gilham's undertaking parlors. Funeral services will be held from Second Baptist church Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of Rev. H. H. DeWitt. Burial will be in Jacksonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 31 Aug 1918)

JOLLY, Emmanuel C.
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

Emmanuel C. Jolly, a life long resident of Franklin, and an uncle of F. G. and H. E. Jolly of Waverly, died at Passavant hospital in Jacksonville Sunday morning, having been in failing health for the past year.
Mr. Jolly was one of Morgan county's few remaining Civil war veterans, having served during the four years of the war.
Mr. Jolly was born near Franklin September 8, 1841, the son of Elijah and Anna Wyatt Jolly, and was 93 years, 3 months and 15 days of age at the time of his death. He was married to Lucinda Hamilton, August 17, 1865, and she died July 6, 1934, at the age of 88 years.
He enlisted in Co. A, 10th Ill. Inf. on July 10, 1861, and served throughout the war. He was a member of the Franklin Christian church.
He is survived by five children, Mrs. Gertrude Hocking of Jacksonville, Mrs. Lennie Tranbarger of Franklin, Mrs. Emma Carlile of Kansas, Mrs. Lizzie Wright and Otis Jolly of California; also two sisters, besides many other relatives.
Funeral services were held at the Neece Funeral Home in Franklin, Tuesday afternoon at 3:30, in charge of Rev. M. L. Pontius, pastor of Central Christian church, Jacksonville. Music was furnished by Mrs. Robert Seymour and Wilbur Seymour, who sang, "The Old Rugged Cross", and "He Sleeps".
The pall bearers were George, Claude, Carl and Walter Jolly, Kenneth Woods and Emory Mann.
The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Starr Edwards, Mrs. Fred Points and Mrs. Eugene Roller.
The Waverly American Legion Post had charge of the burial services in Franklin cemetery.
(Dec. 28, 1934)

JONES, Benjamin J.
 (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPTION)

Benjamin J. Jones, aged 79 years, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Hattie McNeeley, near Nortonville, Sunday morning.
Deceased was born in Zanesville, Ohio, July 25, 1838. When a boy his parents came to Illinois where he has since made his home in Morgan county with the exception of the years spent in the Civil War.
In 1868 Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miranda Sergeant of Franklin who died in 1891. To this union was born 11 children, seven of whom survive. They are: Robert Jones of Turner, Mont.; Mrs. Hattie McNeeley of Nortonville, Walter Jones and Mrs. Nellie Seymour of Modesto, Rolfe Jones of Alberta, Canada, and Reece Jones of Murrayville.
He also leaves the following brothers and sisters, John Jones of Edwardsville, Joshua Jones of Okmulga, Okla.; Z. T. Jones of South East street, Jacksonville; Mrs. Mary Hobbs, Franklin; Mrs. Hannah Meredith, Franklin, and Mrs. Sarah Kelly of Jacksonville.
Mr. Jones was affectionately known as “Uncle Ben.” He was a member of Durbin church and was always faithful in his religious worship. He was a member of Company G, First Missouri Cavalry and served his country with credit during the war. In his death the community loses a good and useful citizen.
Funeral services will be held from the residence of Elmer Jones in Nortonville, Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock in charge of the Rev. W. E. Keenan of Franklin. Burial will be in Providence cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 17 Sept 1918)

JONES, Elah 
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Elah Jones, son of Robert and Lotisha Jones, was born in Morgan county, Ill., May 8, 1837, died at Girard, Ill., Nov. 8th 1900, aged 63 years, 6 months. The deceased was united in wedlock with Mary Hayes, March 3d, 1859. To them were born seven children, three girls, four boys of whom but three, John W., Edward Leslie and Elah Elmer still survive him. His wife Mary died August 26, 1893. On the 14th day of Oct. 1857, at Girard, Ill. He was united in wedlock with Elizabeth Sanford, who lives to mourn the death of a kind and loving husband. Mr. Jones made a profession in Christ twenty years ago and has since lived an upright Christian life to the best of his ability and belief. For about two weeks before his own fatal illness, Mr. Jones was at Waverly taking care of his aged father, Robert Jones, whom he attended with loving and willing care until his own illness compelled him to desist. His father preceded him to the better land by only a few days having passed away on Monday last. Mr. Jones suffered intensely in his last illness but bore it throughout with Christian patience and resignation always thoughtful in his moments of comparative ease from pain, of the welfare of others. His last moments were free from pain and he passed calmly and peacefully away to the blest beyond at 7 o'clock Thursday eve. He leaves to mourn his departure a wife, three children, four brothers and three sisters, besides numerous other relatives and a host of good friends.
Truly a great man has gone to his reward.
There is no death, what seems so is transition, This life of mortal breath. Is but a suburb of the life elysian,,Whose portal we call death. Mr. Jones was well and favorably know in this community having lived here the greater part of his life and he leaves a host of friends and relatives all of whom have nothing but words of commendation for his past life. The body was brought to this city last Saturday morning and the funeral services were conducted at the M. E. church by the Rev. D. T. Black.
(17 Nov. 1900)


JONES, John  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

CIVIL WAR VETERAN JOHN JONES DIES
Oldest of Waverly Veterans Died Tuesday, Nearly 92 years of age.
John Jones, Waverly's oldest Civil War veteran died at his home in this city Tuesday morning at 5:15 o'clock, following an illness of several weeks. Mr. Jones, son of Robert and Letitia Jones, was born a few miles southwest of Waverly on February 17, 1841, and died January 31, 1933, thus being 91 years, 11 months and 14 days of age at the time of his death. With the exception of three years in the war he spent his entire life in this community, having moved from the farm to town about twenty years ago.
The ancestry of Mr. Jones is English. His father, Robert Jones, came to Morgan county when 9 years old, Robert's father, Waitman Jones moving here from Tennessee. Waitman's father, or John's great grandfather, also named Robert Jones, came from England to the United States, settling in Tennessee.
A few months after the beginning of the Civil war Mr. Jones enlisted in Company K of the Twenty- seventh Illinois infantry, being inducted into service on August 20, 1861. After his first battle on November 7, 1861, Mr. Jones saw action in about twenty-five battles including several of the major conflicts of the war, among them being Chickamauga, Stone River and Mission Ridge, finally going to Atlanta. He was mustered out at Camp Butler near Springfield.
Until his death Mr. Jones was a member of Appalonia church of the Waverly M. E. Circuit, having had as his pastor many years ago the illustrious Rev. Newton Cloud who was not only one of the prominent Illinois clergymen but one of its leading statesmen.
Mr. Jones was married on September 19, 1866 to Sarah Frances Ray who died April 30, 1930. A son born to this union died in infancy and a daughter, Mrs. Ada Miner, died in 1914. He is survived by five grandchildren, John, Raymond and Sarah Miner and Mrs. Albert Collins, of Waverly; and Helen Miner, of Chicago; also six great grandchildren, and two brothers, Dave Jones of Neodosha, Kansas , and Sam Jones of Clarion, Iowa.
When Mr. Jones was born, Waverly was a tiny village, scarcely more than just a settlement of about five or six years of age, so the life span of Mr. Jones and Waverly have been very nearly the same.
No man who reached the age of 91 in any other period of the world's history ever saw such change and development as were witnessed by Mr. Jones.
Funeral services were held at the First M.E. church Thursday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. Thomas P. Krumpe, pastor of the M. E. circuit, officiating, assisted by Rev. D. H. Abbott and Rev. R. F. Scott.
Mrs. Wilson M. Smith and Mrs. F. H. Curtiss sang "Lead Kindly Light," "Shall We Gather at the River" and "Face to Face," Miss Mattie Deatherage being the accompanist.
The pall bearers were Howard Burch, R. E. Coe, Edgar Criswell, Ben Keplinger, Elmer Meacham and C. F. Wemple.
The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Eugene Roller, Mrs. Russell Turnbull, and Misses Goldia Cline, Eleanor Flynn, Leah Gooden and Jennie Hudson.
Burial was in Waverly cemetery.
(Friday, February 3, 1933)

JONES, Reuben

Reuben Jones, son of Titus and Irene Jones, was born Sept. 18, 1834, in Knoxville, Tenn. When but a few weeks old his parents moved to this state. He was married to Priscilla Mann Oct. 9, 1856, and of this union six children were born, one dying in infancy. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his loss: John W., Edward K., Henry L., Ella Lee Hocking and Albert C. His death occurred Monday, Jan. 7, 1901, being 66 years, 3 months and 27 days old. He united with the Christian church at Waverly, being converted under the preaching of John Sweeney 44 years ago, and while he has not always been a regular attendant, he has always held to the faith and read his bible at home.
Mr. Jones was respected by all as a good citizen and neighbor and expressed his willingness and readiness to go if it was God's will.
He was mustered into service as a member of Co. G, 101st Ill. Vol., Aug. 13, 1862. Was mustered out of service at Washington, D. C., June 17, 1865, and was discharged at Camp Butler, Springfield, Ill.
(Jan. 11. 1901)

JONES, Timothy

TIMOTHY JONES DIES AT AUBURN
Timothy Jones, son of Ebenezer and Jane Jones, was born October 1, 1840 in Waverly. He was married to Martha A. Staples of Waverly on September 2, 1862. He departed this live December 28, 1917 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Ollie Edwards at Auburn, being at the time of his death, 77 years, 2 months and 17 days old.
At about the age of twenty he enlisted in the Civil War in the 13th Regular Illinois Cavalry. At the end of three months, being disabled for service, he received an honorable discharge and returned home, where he resided until the time of his death.
He was a member of the Christian church in Waverly.
Mr. Jones was the father of nine children, six sons and three daughters, six of whom died in infancy and one daughter, Ida B. Edwards and a son, Charles E. Jones, preceding him in death. He leaves to mourn their loss, his wife, one daughter, Mrs. Ollie Edwards of Auburn, nine grandchildren, six great grandchildren, besides a host of friends.
In his death the church has lost a true and devoted member, the wife a faithful companion, the daughter a loving and indulgent father and the friends a true neighbor, but may we look through out tears and see the justice of God in taking him from us to dwell with him forever.
Funeral services were held at the Christian church in Waverly Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m., in charge of the pastor, Rev. M. S. Metzler. Interment was in East Cemetery.

JOY, James Madison

James Madison Joy was born in Barbersville, Va., April 16, 1840, and died at his home in this city, Sunday, July 11, 1926, aged 86 years, 2 months and 24 days. He spent his boyhood days in Virginia, and came to Illinois as a young man settling near Loami on a farm.
He was united in marriage to Miss Amanda Hall of Loami, January 8, 1867. To this union three children were born. Two are deceased, and one daughter, Mrs. Ida Minnick, together with two grandchildren, Raymond Minnick and Mrs. Helen Conrow, all of LaGrange, Ill., survive. Mrs. Amanda Joy passed away in December, 1881.
He was again untied in marriage on February 22, 1883, with Miss Rachel VanKirk, who is left to mourn the loss of a faithful husband.
Until 1881 Mr. Joy engaged in farming, then removing to Waverly, he entered a business career.
For two years he was in partnership with Frank Rantz in the hardware, furniture and undertaking business. Mr. Rantz sold his interests to Charles Dodd and Messrs. Joy and Dodd continued the business for six years, when the partnership was dissolved. Mr. Joy then engaged in the undertaking business for several years, remaining in that business until 1898 when he became postmaster, an office he held for nine years.
Mr. Joy was a Civil War veteran.

KEHOE, Patrick (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Patrick Kehoe, one of Waverly's oldest and most respected citizens, died in St. John's hospital at Springfield at 5:35 am. Tuesday, Nov. 1, 1904, after an illness of two weeks and two days, of a complication of ailments of the stomach and liver. For several months he had not enjoyed the good health which he had known all through his life, but his demise came sooner than was expected by his family and friends. At his bedside at the time of his death were his wife and son, the Rev. Francis B. Kehoe, who had remained steadily with during his hospital illness.
The body was removed on Tuesday afternoon to the family home east of this city, and on Thursday morning the funeral took place from there to St. Sebastian's church. Burial was at the Catholic cemetery of the same name. The funeral service was unique in that the solemn requiem mass was celebrated by Father Kehoe, who was assisted by Rev. J. J. Driscoll, of Carrollton, as deacon; Rev. J. M. Davis of Virginia, Ill., sub-deacon, and Rev. Thomas Finnessey, of Alton, master of ceremonies. Very Rev. T. Hickey, of Springfield, preached the funeral sermon. Rev. Thos. Carroll, of Virden, was also present in the sanctuary.
The funeral was under the auspices of John W. Ross post No. 331 Grand Army of the Republic, and the Western Catholic Union, in both of which the deceased was a member. Three members of each of these organizations acted as pall bearers. Of the former J. M. Joy, J. W. Fishback and John M. Criswell, and of the latter Patrick Maher, John Fromme and Charles Goss. One of the largest concourses of friends seen at any funeral in recent months followed the remains to the cemetery.
Mr. Kehoe was born April 2, 1834, in County Carlow, Ireland. He came to America when fourteen years old, and nine years later settled in Waverly, where he has lived ever since. He served in the civil war from September, 1861, to September, 1864. He was twice married: first to Margaret Braimick, in Auburn, New York Nov. 5, 1865, and from this union there were born three sons and a daughter, namely, John E. of Chicago, Francis B., of Greenfield, Chas. R. of Waverly, and Anna who died when five years of age. On August 24, 1882 he was married a second time, to Maria Rourke of Greenview, Ill., who survives him and is called upon to mourn the loss of a kind and loving husband.

KENT, Enoch  
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

Was Former Resident of Waverly. Remains Brought Here Sunday for Burial.
Enoch Kent, the son of Absalom and Isabel Kent, was born at Cadiz, Harrison County, Ohio, September 30, 1825, and died as a result of a stroke of paralysis while visiting at the home of a nephew in Lakeville, Indiana, at 2:15 a.m., Friday, September 4, 1914. He was married to Margaret Ramsey, April 11, 1848. To this union there were two children born; Emma, who became the wife of W. T. Givens, and who died December, 1895, and George, of Chicago.
Mr. Kent was one of a family of fourteen children, having four brothers and nine sisters. He moved to Franklin, Ill. In 1855, he came to Waverly and lived here continuously until 1901, when after the death of his wife October 6, he removed to Chicago and made his home with his son.
He served as a volunteer in the Civil war for about two years, as a member of Co. G, 13th Illinois Cavalry. In his young manhood he was converted and united with the First M. E. Church of Waverly, and has remained a member of the same through all the years. He was a very regular attendant at the services of the church until increasing deafness deprived him of the privilege of participating in them, and then, though he did not attend the services, he was a devout observer of the Sabbath day.
He was a blacksmith by trade, and is remembered by all as he worked at his forge here.
Mr. Kent leaves to mourn his departure two brothers and one sister; his son, George R., of Chicago; two granddaughters, Mrs. L. F. Chilton of New Berlin, and Mrs. J. T. Douglas of Morristown, South Dakota, and nine great grandchildren, besides other relatives and many friends.
The remains were brought to this city Sunday afternoon, and taken to the residence of C. N. Richardson, where the funeral services were held at 3 o'clock, in charge of Rev. J. S. Smith. The burial at the East cemetery was in charge of the Masonic order, of which the deceased was a member.


KEPLINGER, Benjamin Franklin 
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPT)

The subject of this sketch, Benjamin Franklin Keplinger, was the son of John E. and Loretta Keplinger and was born in Illinois, January 15, 1844, departing this life July 21, 1920. He had passed his seventy-sixth mile stone and was more than half way on the journey to his seventy-seventh when his message came to cease his earthly pilgrimage.
He was of a family of seven children, three of whom preceded him in death. He was also preceded in death by one grandchild, John Franklin Short.
On January 15, 1868, he was united in marriage to Rachel Holiday to which union three children were born, John Benjamin and Mrs. Ella Short who live in the vicinity of Waverly and Mrs. Hattie Stice of Altamont, Illinois.
He with his father, served in the army during the Civil War, he himself, serving with Co. B, 101st Illinois Infantry. He has been active in the G. A. R., holding at times the highest office in the local camp.
Converted in youth, he lived a Christian life and was an acceptable member of the Methodist Episcopal church at the time of his departure.
A part of his education was obtained at the Illinois Weslyan university at Bloomington.
He was devoted to his family and as a father and a citizen he was a Christian gentleman.
Those of the near relatives who survive are his wife and three children previously mentioned; one sister, Mrs. Juliet Messerly; two brothers, N. G. and J. W. Keplinger, all of Waverly; seven grandchildren and three great grandchildren.
Funeral services were conducted in the First M.E. church, Friday afternoon, July 23, at 1:30 o'clock,
Rev. Frances E. Smith, pastor of the church officiating. Interment was in East cemetery.
"The stars shall shine for a thousand years.
For a thousand years and a day.
When the stars are passed away.
Let faith exalt her joyful voice,
And now in triumph sing;
O Grave. Where is thy victory?
And where, O Death, thy sting?
(July 30, 1920)

KEPLINGER, H. G.
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

DIES SUDDENLY MONDAY
Civil War Veteran and Prominent Figure in Community Life Answers Last Roll-Call at Daughter's Home Monday.
Hardin G. Keplinger, veteran of the Civil War, president of the Franklin State Bank, and a prominent figure in the life of this community for more than half a century, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Wm. T. Dodsworth, at 11:30 Monday morning. While it was known that he was not in the best of health friends and family had not considered his condition so serious. He took active part in the Memorial Day exercises and news of his passing after being confined to the house a few days with what was thought only a temporary illness by many was a shock to all.
Hardin Green Keplinger was a life-long resident of this community. He was blest with a pioneer ancestry, being the fourth in a family of twelve children of Samuel and Permelia Green Keplinger. His grandfather on the maternal side came to Morgan county in 1822 and his father, a native of Tennessee, located here in 1829. Samuel Keplinger lived in Jacksonville for four years and then entered land one mile northwest of Franklin where the son Hardin was born November 25, 1839.
After attending the rude pioneer schools of that early day the youth entered Illinois College at Jacksonville and was in his senior year at the outbreak of the Civil War. He promptly enlisted in the Hardin Light Guards, a Jacksonville military organization, which became Company B of the 10th Illinois Infantry.
This company arrived at Camp Yates, Springfield, on April 22, 1861, within ten days after the firing on Fort Sumpter, and a few days later went to Cairo. It had the honor of being the first union troops to set foot in Kentucky and later attracted the personal attention of Gen. Geo. B. McClellan who had it drill before his headquarters. The company's term of enlistment expired in 90 days and Hardin Keplinger thereupon enlisted in the 32nd Illinois Infantry and served that regiment as adjutant until the close of the war. He took part in the engagements at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Nashville, Mobile and Fort Blakely, and sustained wounds in the battle of Shiloh and siege of Corinth.
Returning home at the close of the war he settled on a farm of his own near his birthplace and October 3, 1867, was united in marriage with Miss Mattie Bell, daughter of Jeremiah Bell, a prominent citizen and early settler of Jersey county. Three children born to this union grew to maturity and survive the parents: Maurice Bell Keplinger, and Mrs. Lulu Dodsworth, of Franklin, and Mrs. Ada Shepherd of Oakland, Calif. Mrs. Keplinger passed away June 25, 1875.
Mr. Keplinger is also survived by two brothers, Lewis W. Keplinger, of Kansas City, Kan., and M. Luther Keplinger of Carlinville, and one sister, Mrs. Ella Smith, of Kidder, Mo. There are six grandchildren, J. Miller Keplinger, Alan Keplinger, Miss Winifred Keplinger, Hardin, Willard and Mary Dodsworth.
In 1886 Mr. Keplinger felt that the time had come when his home community needed a bank, and with W. H. Wright organized the Franklin Bank. Upon the death of Mr. Wright in 1891 he purchased his partner's interest and his son Maurice became associated with him in the business. In 1920 when the institution was reorganized as the Franklin State Bank, H. G. Keplinger became its first president. His upright, honorable life has no doubt had much to do with the success of the bank which has always enjoyed the fullest measure the confidence of this community and others with whom it has had business relations.
O. F. Buffe, now an officer of the Ayers National Bank in Jacksonville, was very pleasantly associated with the father and son for several years, eventually leaving to seek a larger field for his talents.
Mr. Keplinger had for many years been a valued member of Wadley Lodge, No. 611, A.F. & A.M., of this place, and took a keen interest in the work of the Masonic order. So long as John B. Duncan Post, G. A. R., survived, he was one of its active members and served as the Post Commander. He had also served as president of the village board and in various ways aided in the development of our community. While of rather retiring disposition and not a man who sought publicity, it was generally known among our people that his help could always be counted on in any worthy cause, and that it would be generous help, freely and gladly extended. Living among us for more than eighty years, reserving such criticisms as he may have had, meet his fellow men with open hands and a kindly heart, it is not surprising that all of us looked upon him as a kind friend with whom we part with sincere regret.
He was a regular attendant at the services of Franklin M. E. church and a member of the Brotherhood
Class of the Sunday school. He was always a liberal supporter of the church and his subscription was a large factor in the building of the new church erected a few years ago.
Some months since his health began to fail and he entered a Jacksonville hospital and submitted to an operation which it was thought would afford him relief. This was apparently successful and last summer he went to California to spend the winter with his daughters in San Francisco suburbs. He returned to the village with Mrs. Dodsworth about three weeks ago and seemingly in good health for a man of his advanced years. He was in the line of march on Memorial Day and the next day took a vigorous outing. Evidently he overtaxed his strength for the next day he was confined to what proved to be his deathbed. Saturday and Sunday he was reported as much improved and hoping to be about this week. Monday morning he was in good spirits but after taking medicine at 11 o'clock dropped into a sinking spell and passed away in half an hour, heart failure being the immediate cause of his demise.
Funeral services will be conducted form the M. E. church this afternoon at 3 o'clock in charge of the pastor, Rev. H. A. Sherman. Music for the services will be supplied by Mrs. M. L. Anderson, Miss Ruth Tulpin, Edgar Eador and Jos. Williamson, with Miss May Boulware at the organ. The quartet will sing
"Lead Kindly Light," "Fade, Fade Each Earthly Joy" and "Shall We Gather at the River," the last a hymn sung at the funeral of Mrs. Keplinger 46 years ago. Mrs. Anderson and Miss Tulpin will also sing "One Sweetly solemn thought" as a duet. Members of the Brotherhood class will act as ushers.
The casket will be draped with the national flag and the floral tributes will be cared for by a committee from the Eastern Star Chapter, Mrs. Jas. E. Sinclair, Misses Lou Duncan, Grace Hill and Maud Criswell.
Interment will be made in the village cemetery. O. F. Buffe, of Jacksonville, Wm. R. Hills, W. C. Calhoun, Lewis Roberts, A. H. Wright and Henry Slack will serve as active bearers and surviving veterans of the Civil War as honorary bearers. The services at the grave will be in charge of Wadley Masonic lodge.
All business houses in the village will be closed during the funeral hour.


LAMBERT, John F. 
(Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPTS)

John F. Lambert was born in Lighterdale County, Alabama, in 1846 and died near his home in Waverly on December 5, 1913 at the age of 66 years, 6 months and 20 days.
In April 1864 he came to Illinois and enlisted in Company H of the 133rd Illinois Volunteers. In the year of 1867 he was married to Miss Sarah Samples. To this union were born five children, Mary Ann Lambert, Luella Draper, Ida Rilling and Clarence, all have preceded him in death, while Charles of Waverly still survives.
On October 13, 1884 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Baggerly. To this union eight children were born, four of which, Clark, Asa, Claude and an infant have died, while Walter, Carman, Frank and Florence, all of Waverly still survive; thus he leaves a wife and five children to mourn the loss of a husband and father.
Funeral services were held at the home Saturday afternoon, December 6, conducted by Rev. H. M. Ellis, after which the remains were laid to rest in the East cemetery.
(Dec. 12, 1913)

LAWS, John Perry
(Burial in Pasdena, CA)

John Perry Laws, son of Stephen and Sarah Laws was born at Lynnville, Ill., July 16, 1844. When about two years of age the family removed to Exeter, where he resided until the breaking out of the Civil War. In June 1862 he enlisted in Company F, 129th Regular Illinois Volunteers and served until the close of the war. He was with General Sherman in his Famous "March to the Sea."
In October 1867 Mr. Laws was united in marriage to Margaret Ellen Chrisman, of Merritt. They were the parents of four children, three of whom died in early infancy. One son, J. Elmer Laws, survives.
Soon after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Laws moved to Morgan County, settling on a farm a few miles south of Waverly. Later, they sold the farm and became residents of the city. For the past twelve years they have lived in Pasadena, California. December last, Mr. Laws underwent an operation for stricture of the bowels. The operation afforded only temporary relief and he gradually became weaker until the end came. He passed away June 12, 1916, aged 71 years, 10 months and 26 days.
Early in life he made a public confession of his faith in Christ, united with the Church of Christ and for nearly half a century was a faithful member, serving the church first as deacon and later as elder. He passed away peacefully and died as he had lived, "in the full assurance of faith."
Besides the widow and son, Mr. Laws leaves one sister, Miss Anna Laws and one niece, Miss Lucy Laws, both of Waverly.
Interment will be made at Pasadena California.
(June 26, 1916, Waverly Journal)

LOVING, George W.

Sutton News
Sutton, Nebraska
May 11, 1923
Ancestor of Jim Loving
GEO. W. LOVING PASSES TO THE BEYOND
George W. Loving, one of our best known, and most beloved citizens after a short illness departed from this life last Saturday morning, May 5, 1923 at 10:45 o'clock. Mr. Loving's death was a severe shock felt by everyone.
Especially do the children mourn the absence of this grand old man, who always had a kind word and an affectionate smile for each one at all times. As a veteran of the Civil War, he was a staunch supporter of the American Legion and was in full sympathy with legislative measures for the benefit of World War veterans.
Funeral services were held from the Congregational church Sunday afternoon at three o'clock. The body was shipped to Virden, ILL., the following day for internment. Deceased was born on the 10th day of January, 1844.
He grew to young manhood on a farm near Waverly and when the call came to join the colors when the Civil war broke out, he was one of the first young men of the neighborhood to enlist. He was in the service from 1861 to 1865, a member of Company "G", 101, Illinois infantry. He was in the battles of Lookout Mountain and Shiloh, Siege of Vicksburg, Sherman's march to the sea, and many other battles. He received his honorable discharge in 1865, with a record full of courage and bravery.
He was married to Adelia Rosson of Waverly, Illinois, October 11, 1866. She died in November 1899. To this union were born seven children, four boys and three girls, who are all living, Parris E., of Stewart Lake, Canada, Arthur S., of Rockford, Illinois, Mrs. Samuel Haggard and Mrs. William Roberts of Virden, Illinois, Edward H. and Charles S. of Omaha, Nebr., and Mrs. Harvey Stenson of Sutton.
Mr. Loving moved from Illinois to Sutton, Nebraska, with his seven motherless children in March 1892, and resided all these years in the home known as "Loving's corner" and he will be greatly missed by his many friends who as they passed daily by his home, were always sure of a warm greeting from him. He united with the Methodist Episcopal church in boyhood and has ever since remained a faithful member of that church.


LUTTRELL, John West
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

March 24, 1922

Civil War Veteran Called By Death
John West Luttrell Died Monday After a Lingering Illness, at the Age of 85 Years.
Having been in ill health for about two years, John Wes Luttrell, pioneer Morgan County resident and veteran of the Civil War, took sick several weeks ago and gradually grew worse until Monday when he passed away at 2 o'clock in the afternoon.
John West Luttrell, third son of Hiram and Sarah Luttrell, was born February 22, 1837, and died at his home in Waverly, Monday, March 20, 1922, at 2 p.m., at the age of 85 years and 26 days.
His youth was spent on the farm near Franklin with his parents, who were among the first settlers of Morgan county. His education was begun in the subscription schools and completed when the free school system was introduced.
When the War of the Rebellion came on and the flag of our Union was in danger, he responded to the call for volunteers and enlisted in Company I, 14th Illinois Volunteers at Jacksonville, Ill., in 1861. After three years of service, he was honorably mustered out in Springfield, Ill., in June 1864. He was in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Big Hatchie, the Siege of Vicksburg, and many minor engagements. After his discharge, Mr. Luttrell returned to the scenes of his early childhood and became a farmer.
On February 15, 1865, he was united in holy wedlock to Miss Nancy Burnett, who died August 23, 1911. To them were born five children: Laura, Grant and Mrs. Minnie Bateman, who preceded him in death, and Sherman Luttrell and Mrs. Luetta Evans, who survive him. He also leaves three sisters, Mrs. Mary Woods, Mrs. Julia Meacham and Mrs. Nin Ferguson, as well as eleven grandchildren and four great grandchildren. The devotion of Mr. Luttrell to his family was something beautiful. It gave him great pleasure to have his children and grandchildren around him, and he loved them.
He united with the Christian church in Franklin during the later sixties. In these earlier years the visiting preachers always found a welcome in his home. He was one of the leading promoters in the building of the present church home in Franklin, and made the first subscription for its construction. During his later years he has been associated with the Waverly Christian church. He loved the church and was faithful in his attendance to the last, although he could not hear a word that was said. The communion service came to be his greatest delight.
There are many who can testify to his kindness of heart, and sincere interest in the welfare of his friends.
Funeral services were held at the Christian church Wednesday afternoon, March 22, at 1:00 o'clock.
Rev. J. N. Thomas, the pastor, officiated, assisted by Rev. C. W. Hamand, pastor of the First M. E. church.
Members of the G. A. R. who attended the funeral were: John Beatty, Richard Cox, James Harris, John Criswell, W. T. Osborn, Jerome Dupy, John Maginn, Ben Darley and Edwin Batty. The pall bearers were six nephews of the deceased: Dr. M. F. Woods, C. C. Woods, Jim Woods, Jr., Harry Luttrell, William Luttrell and Sidney W. Burnett. Interment was made in Franklin cemetery.


LUTTRELL, William T.
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

William T. Luttrell, a veteran of the Civil War and one of the best known residents of the county died Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock at his home two and one-half miles south of Franklin. For two or three years Mr. Luttrell had been in failing health but his condition was not such as to cause alarm until about a week ago when he became seriously ill and gradually grew weaker until the end.
William T. Luttrell was born on the farm where he died December 20, 1831, the son of John R. and Margaret (Duncan) Luttrell, both natives of Kentucky. His grandfather was Thomas Luttrell, who came to Morgan county from Adair county, Kentucky in 1822, bought land and built a saw and grist mill on Apple Creek.
He was one of the early pioneers of Morgan county and served as Judge of Apple Creek precinct in the first Morgan county election.
Mr. Luttrell's father, John R., devoted his life to farming and on reaching manhood bought eight acres of land to which he later added another eighty. He was married in March, 1831, and he and his wife reared a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters, William T., being the first born of the family.
William T. Luttrell was reared to farming in his boyhood, meanwhile attending school near his home, and still later in the village of Franklin and Waverly. He was married in 1869 to Mary F. Burnett, who died February 14, 1870. He chose for his second wife Eliza A. Wright, to whom he was married February 20, 1887. She was a daughter of William Wright of Scott county, Ky. Her father moved to Morgan county in 1829, and was a soldier in the Black Hawk war of 1832, while her grandfather fought seven years in the Revolution during which he was promoted to captain. The grandfather of Mr. Luttrell was also a soldier in the Black Hawk war.
Mr. Luttrell himself had too much of the ancestral blood in his veins to remain a quiet spectator during the Civil War. He therefore enlisted at Franklin on August 9, 1862, in Company H., 101 Illinois Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He entered the service as a second lieutenant and when mustered out at Washington had been promoted to the rank of captain. His regiment participated in many important engagements, including Shermans' march to the sea, the battles of Lookout Mountain, Chickamauga and for a time his duties lay in gunboat service on the Mississippi and in the siege of Vicksburg. Returning to Morgan county after the close of the war, Mr. Luttrell resumed farming, which proved very profitable for him, as he owned a well stocked and well improved farm of 340 acres. He followed mixed farming and had grown a good grade of stock.
The deceased was a member of the Christian church and in politics he was a staunch Republican. He had served several times on the school board in his district. Mr. Luttrell was one of the best known residents of the county and during his long and useful life he had made a large circle of friends who respected him for his many sterling qualities. He is survived by his wife, two sisters, Mrs. Martha Wyatt of Springfield, and Mrs. Nellie Hamilton of Jacksonville; and one brother, John Luttrell of Franklin. He is a brother-in-law of George and Henry Wright of Jacksonville. He was preceded in death by three brothers, Hiram, James and Newton Luttrell.
Funeral services will be held Monday at 11 o'clock at the Methodist Episcopal church in Franklin in charge of Rev. Bell and Rev. Mr. Teaney.

MCCASLAND, W. A.

W. A. McCasland, one of the pioneer real estate men of East St. Louis, passed away Saturday night at the age of 74 years. He had been ailing for a week but his condition was not considered serious. Saturday he was down town attending to his business and apparently feeling quite well. Shortly before ten o'clock Saturday evening he called his daughter, Miss Grace McCasland, saying he did not feel well, and asking her to send for his doctor. The end came peacefully before the physician arrived. He is survived by his daughter, Miss Grace McCasland, and son Henry McCasland.
Mr. McCasland was a man of business integrity and of good habits. He lived a moral and upright life. He made friends easily and leaves a host of friends to mourn his loss.
At the beginning of the Civil War Mr. McCasland enlisted as a private in the 38th Ill. He served throughout the war and was honorably discharged at its close.
Funeral services were held at the residence Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Interment was made Tuesday in Waverly, Ill., the former home of the deceased, where his wife and several children are buried.
(June 3, 1910)


MCCORMICK, William D.
Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPTION

DEATH SUMMONS WM. MCCORMICK TUESDAY NIGHT
Another Civil War Veteran Answers Final Call - Was Well Known Over Country
The death of William D. McCormick, Civil War veteran and long time county citizen occurred at 6:45 o'clock, Tuesday evening at his home, 1035 Grove street. His age was 82 years, 4 months and 23 days.
Mr. McCormick was born near Woodson, August 23, 1844, son of Walter and Eleanor Jane Rannells McCormick, who came to this county from Kentucky. With the exception of twelve years spent in Kansas, Mr. McCormick had always been a resident of this county.
He was united in marriage in June 1871, with Miss Laura Allen of Topeka, Kansas and to this union two sons were born, Walter and James. Mrs. McCormick preceded him in death in 1891, and the son, Walter, died in 1894 at the age of 22.
On Oct. 30, 1895, mr. McCormick was joined in marriage with Annie Darley, who survives with the son, James L. McCormick and one sister, Miss Ann McCormick, all of Jacksonville. Miss Ann McCormick is the last surviving member of a family of six. Two nieces, Mrs. Martin Brubaker of Litchfield and Mrs. Anna Crust of Normal, and two nephews, T. K. McCormick of Greenview and Walter McCormick of the state of Washington also survive.
All except Walter McCormick are expected to attend the funeral.
Mr. McCormick was a farmer by occupation, having spent nearly fifty years actively engaged in stock feeding and general farming. He retired from active work about 20 years ago.
At the start of the Civil War, the decedent enlisted with Company C, 145th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served through the entire duration of the war. After returning from army service mr. McCormick entered Illinois College and though he did not finish his course there he was granted the Bachelor of Science degree by the college later in life.
Until recently Mr. McCormick was able to get around and meet friends. He, with S. W. Nichols, attended every chautauqua session held in Jacksonville. He was a lover of such entertainment. Mr. McCormick has been affiliated with church for 20 years. He attended Westminster Presbyterian church for 20 years. He attended services regularly when his health permitted. He was chaplain of Matt Starr Post, G. A. R., at the time of death.
The remains were removed to the Reynolds Mortuary last night and will be returned to the residence, 1035 Grove street, at 9:30 o'clock tomorrow morning. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon at Westminster Presbyterian church, Rev. H. K. Young, officiating. Interment will be made in the
Asbury cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 26 Jan 1927)

MAGINN, John C.

John C. Maginn was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, November 6, 1846, and died at his home in this city, Saturday night, April 29, 1933, at the age of 86 years, 5 months and 23 days, following an illness of four months, resulting from a fractured hip.
Mr. Maginn, frequently called "Uncle John", was a veteran of the Civil War, having entered at the early age of fifteen as a drummer boy.
In 1868 he was married to Maria A. Moxon and moved to Mechanicsburg, Illinois. After being there for a time, they next settled in the Little York vicinity, where they lived for approximately twenty years. To them were born 5 children: John Frederick, now deceased; Mrs. Phillip Nipper of Monticello, Arkansas; Mrs. Will Schramm, Mrs. Lee Carson and Charley Maginn of this community. There are twenty-two grandchildren and nineteen great grandchildren.
In 1902 Mr. and Mrs. Maginn moved to Waverly. They had been here only a short time until Mrs. Maginn died, November 4, 1904. Later he married Mrs. Rebecca Mason, now deceased.
Mr. Maginn, throughout his life, has been affiliated with the church, and until death was a member of the Methodist church of this city.
In addition to all relatives he leaves a host of friends to mourn his death. Funeral services were held at the Swift Funeral Home Monday afternoon, May 1, at 2 o'clock, in charge of Rev. D. H. Abbott, pastor of the First M.E. church. Music was furnished by Miss Edith Smedley, Miss Elizabeth Stockdale and Mrs. F. H. Curtiss, who sang "Nearer, Still Nearer", "No Night There", and "God Will Take Care of You" with Miss Mattie Deatherage as accompanist.
The pall bearers were six grandsons of the deceased, Floyd Schramm, Raymond Maginn, Harold Maginn, Otis Maginn, Fred Maginn and William Carson.
The flowers were cared for by six granddaughters, Mrs. Floyd Schramm, Mrs. Leslie Edwards, Mrs. Raymond Maginn, Mrs. Harold Maginn, Misses Erma and Elizabeth Carson.
Burial was in Waverly cemetery.

MAHER, Patrick
(Click for Cemetery Inscription)

Patrick Maher was born in Tipperary Co., Ireland, March 16, 1844 and died at his home in Waverly, Sunday morning February 6, at 6:15 aged 65 years, 10 months and 20 days, after an illness of eighteen months.
Patrick Maher came to this country when a boy of 17, and located at St. Charles, Mo., where he enlisted in Co. D, First Battalion Calvary, Missouri State Militia March 17, 1862. He served his country through the war suffering hardships that only the soldiers can tell and after receiving an honorable discharge he came to Illinois in 1871 and on Dec. 7, 1874, he was united in marriage to Mary Finan who with five daughters and one son survive him.
Mr. Maher was a familiar figure and his friends are unnumbered by his acquaintances. His was a cheerful disposition and he strove to help mankind and was a member of the Western Catholic Union, and John W. Ross, Post No. 331 G. A. R. of Waverly.
Funeral services were held at St. Sebastian church Tuesday, at 9:30 a.m. and interment in the Catholic cemetery. (Feb. 10, 1910)


MASTERS, James Madison
(Click for Cemetery Inscription)

The venerable James M. Masters, died at the home of his son, S. D. Masters at noon Sunday. Mr. Masters was born in Overton county, Tenn., April 3, 1817, and came here in the spring of 1830, and settled with the family in a cabin on the spot now occupied by Illinois College. In the fall of the same season the family moved to a place a mile and a half west of Murrayville, and that vicinity has been the residence since.
In 1841, he was married to Rebecca Dinwiddie, who died in 1873. He was the father of five sons and two daughters and all have died except one, S. D. Masters, so well known in this city. The last death in his family occurred 18 years ago. His sons and daughters were all promising, but passed away one after another.
He also leaves a brother, S. D. Masters, in Petersburg, and aged 84.
Mr. Masters was a man of indomitable perseverance and overcame obstacles which would have caused a less courageous person to give up in despair. He had no early advantages, but went to work and acquired a fair, practical education and in his later life was a great reader, and being a man of remarkable memory, could converse intelligently in matters of history with those who had seen much of the world. He had nothing at all in the beginning but a good name and that enabled him to get some oxen and plows and with these he went to work and earned the beginning of the large fortune left. He was a member of the M. P. church of Murrayville until it passed out of existence. He was very much devoted to his family and was a man honest in all his dealings and respected for his true worth. In his last days he was most tenderly cared for by his devoted son and daughter-in-law, who did all possible for his comfort and welfare. Death was the result of a general failure of the system, the machine simply running down and stopping. He anticipated the end several weeks before it came and declared himself ready and glad to go and meet those who had gone before and to await the coming of those left behind. It was a singular coincidence that he died at exactly the age of 81. He was born April 3, 1817, at noon and died April 3, 1898, at noon.
The funeral will be held at the residence of his son, S. D. Masters, at 9:30 this morning and the remains will be taken to Murrayville for interment.
(Interred in Bethel cemetery - April 5, 1898)


MAUL, Henry
(Click for Cemetery Listing)

HENRY MAUL DIED AT EARLY HOUR TODAY
Deceased Long Resident of the County - Funeral Arrangements Incomplete.
Henry Maul died at 1:50 o'clock this (Wednesday) morning at his home on North Main street after an illness of two weeks. He was 80 years of age at the time of his death. His wife died four years ago. He is survived by one son L. H. Maul of Literberry and two daughters, Mrs. Robert Clark of Chapin and Mrs. William Phillips of Literberry. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, February 7, 1917)
MAUL
Brief mention was made in Wednesday's Journal of the death of Henry Maul a well known resident of this city. Mr. Maul died at his home, 815 North Main street, Wednesday morning at 1:50 o'clock.
Deceased was born in Frankford, Germany, May 15, 1837. He came to America in 1859. He enlisted in the union army and served three years in the First Missouri cavalry under Capt. Barber Lewis.
After his discharge Mr. Maul settled in Arcadia north of this city. He was married Oct. 1, 1867 to Miss Elizabeth Yeck of Arenzville. He is survived by the following children: Lewis H. Maul of Literberry, Mrs. Robert Clark of Chapin and Mrs. William H. Phillips of Literberry.
Many years ago Mr. Maul united with the Lutheran church at Arenzville. Afterward on account of the distance he had to go to church he united with the Methodist Protestant church at Arcadia. He united with the Christian church at Literberry in 1906. Mr. Maul was a man noted for his uprightness and integrity and was highly regarded as a citizen. October 1906 Mr Maul moved with his family to Jacksonville and resided two years. He then moved to Literberry in 1907 and resided a year and then moved back to this city where he resided until his death.
The remains were removed to Gillham's undertaking establishment and prepared for burial. Funeral services will be held from Gillham's parlors this morning at 10:30 o'clock in charge of Rev. L. A. hadaway, pastor of Chapin Central Christian Church. Burial will be in Arcadia cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, February 8, 1917)

MEACHAM, Milton Morris

Milton Morris Meacham was born about six miles north of Waverly, September 7, 1838 and departed from this life July 25, 1918 at 10:40 p.m. at the age of 79 years, 10 months and 18 days. He moved to Waverly with his parents, Jonathan and Susan Meacham, January 29, 1859.
In April 1861 he enlisted in Co. I, 14th Illinois Vol. Infantry and served a little over three years.
After returning from the army he engaged in the clothing business in Waverly.
On November 27, 1864 he was united in marriage to Maria C. Holliday. To this union were born four children: three sons, Jonathan, Joseph, Elmer and one daughter, Tillie, all preceding him in death with his wife except one son, Elmer, with whom he made his home after his wife's death, until he died.
He took active part in the business circles of Waverly, and for many years and up until his last sickness was engaged in the Insurance and Real Estate business.
He was a faithful member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge and served as Financial Secretary many years.
About the year 1884 he united with the First M. E. church.
He served as postmaster of Waverly under President Cleveland four years.
He is survived by one son, Elmer, one granddaughter Eva, one brother, W. D. Meacham, and one sister, Mrs. M. A. Waddell, all of this city; one grandson, Maurice, and one great-granddaughter, who reside near Jacksonville.
He was afflicted for many years, and on November 1, 1917 he was taken down and suffered for nearly nine months, bearing his suffering very patiently, until death relieved him.
Funeral services were held at the family residence Saturday, July 27, at 10 o'clock a.m., Rev. F. E. Smith, pastor of the First M. E. church officiating. Interment was in East cemetery.
(August 2, 1918)

MEACHAM, Willis E.
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Captain Willis E. Meacham was born in Christian County Kentucky, Oct. 27th, 1828, and died at his home in this city Nov. 27th, 1889.
He came to Illinois with his father, Mr. E. D. Meacham, in the year 1831, and settled on Lick Creek, in Sangamon County. March 1st, 1854 he was united in marriage with Miss Rachel Hudson, and to them were born three children, Addie, Helen and Margaret. Helen dying in infancy while Addie and Margaret with his wife survive him.
In the year 1857 he moved to Waverly where he resided up to his death with the exception of his term of service in the late war. His occupation in life, in the main, was that of a farmer' practical and never flinching from any kind of work that he saw ought to be done. As a citizen Captain Meacham was very highly esteemed by all who knew him; he placed high stress upon his word, contracts, and in his dealings with men, always recognizing and respecting the religious and moral element of society in any community, not infrequently criticizing those who did not.
In regard to his military life, he enlisted in Company G, 101st. Reg. Ill. Vol. Infantry, Aug. 9th, 1862, from this place. He was elected 1st Lieut. In starting out and after the resignation of Captain Robert McKee he was promoted to captain of the company, which he faithfully and nobly filled up to his resignation which took place on account of failing health, Feb. 1st, 1865, at which time but few of his company expected him to live long. He left home, family and friends to help defend the flag of the country he loved and stayed with the boys from the first; sharing the march and battles from Cairo to the Sea, and after crossing the river at Savannah, Ga., at what was known as Smokey Rome, in South Carolina, he bid his boys good bye and while yet strong in mind the tears stole down his cheeks, as he called them by name, and pressing the hand of each he bid them farewell. Captain Meacham was a firm believer in the Christian religion and though not himself a professing Christian, he always had a warm regard for a true consistent Christian. In his last sickness he expressed on different occasions his belief in the scriptures, his respect for the church, and the necessity of preparation for death, and only regretted that he had not all his life been a Christian. Before his death he expressed his confidence in the merits of Christ and the mercy of God, and died trusting in the Saviour. Capt. Willis E. Meacham to this community will be missed and not soon to be forgotten by any who knew him. And while his body is laid to silent rest, may we hope for a heavenly enjoyment of his spirit beyond. The funeral took place at the M. E. Church, at which there was a very large attendance indeed. A very convincing sermon was preached by Rev. Mr. Adams from Matthew, 24, 44. Mr. Adams was assisted by the other pastors of the city and the Captain's old chaplain, Rev. Wingate Newman, of Palmyra. At the close the remains were taken in charge by John W. Ross Post No. 331, G. A. R. and interred in the east cemetery.


MERIT, William Henry
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William Henry Merit was born November 15, 1840, in North Carolina, and died at the home of his daughter in Springfield, Wednesday, October 11, 1916. At an early age he moved to Naples and then to Auburn. He was united in marriage to Sarah A. Clark, December 30, 1866, and has resided in Waverly since July 1876.
He is survived by his wife and daughter, Mrs. M. M. Hinckle, of Springfield, an adopted daughter, Irene, and four grandchildren, William F., Charles L., Edna L., and Lela J. Hinckle, of Springfield.
At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in Co. D, 14th Ill. Cavalry, and served two years, being discharged at the Louisville hospital on account of sickness. He was a member of the John W. Ross Post, No. 331, of the G. A. R.
Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon, October 12, at the late residence in Waverly, in charge of Rev. S. C. Schaeffer, pastor of the Congregational church, and interment was in East cemetery.


MILLION, Elijah F.

Elijah F. Million, one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of Murrayville passed away Tuesday afternoon at 4:45 o'clock. Mr. Million had been in failing health for two years past but it was not until about a week ago that he took to his bed.
Mr. Million was born May 27, 1846 in this county and has spent practically his entire life in the Murrayville vicinity.
In October 1870 he was married to Miss Eliza Esther Kennedy and to this union seven children were born, two of whom, Sadie M. and George Edward have passed beyond and of whom five survive, as follows: Emory E. Million, residing in Oklahoma; Hugh E. Million and Mrs. James E. Osborne, Murrayville; Clyde K. Million of Delavan and Mrs. Warren E. Wright, Murrayville.
Mr. Million enlisted in Co. E in the 58th regiment, Illinois Vol. And saw long and honorable service in the civil war.
Returning from the war he continued the life of a farmer, retaining his active habits until three years ago when he retired and removed to Murrayville.
Funeral services will be held Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock at Murrayville M. E. church, in charge of the Rev. W. H. McGhee, the pastor. The Masonic order will attend in a body and will conduct the service at the grave. Burial will be made in Murrayville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, August 15, 1917)

MITCHELL, Jabez

Taps Sounds for Civil War Veteran
JABEZ MITCHELL PASSES AWAY
Jabez Mitchell, son of Joseph and Sarah Mitchell was born July 19, 1839 in Findon, Northamptonshire, England, and departed this life December 18, 1917, at the age of 78 years, 4 months and 29 days.
His parents, with two sons and three daughters, came to America in 1849, and were six weeks crossing the Atlantic. They made their way up the Mississippi River to St. Louis and then to Naples, Ill. The father and two sons walked to Lynnville, Morgan Co., where settlement was made. In 1855 the family removed to Sangamon County and located in Loami Township.
He was in the opening years of stalwart, vigorous manhood when the war broke out and August 13, 1861, he volunteered for the defense of the home of his adoption, becoming a member of Company B., Thirtieth Illinois Infantry, commanded by Col. P. B. Fouke. He was mustered out of the service at Louisville, Ky., and discharged at Camp Butler, July 27, 1865, having won a fine military record as one of the bravest and most faithful soldiers of his regiment.
Mr. Mitchell was married the year after he left the army to Miss Clara Carter, the marriage being solemnized April 8, 1866. To this union were born four children: Frank C. (deceased), Nellie Carter Taylor of Waverly; Charles Harry of Tobias, Neb., and William M. of Los Angeles, Calif. Mrs. Mitchell departed from this life in 1879.
On August 18, 1882, Mr. Mitchell was married to Miss Mattie Carter, a sister of his former wife.
One child, Mrs. Myrtle West of Fort Dodge, Iowa was born to this union.
(December 21, 1917)

MOFFETT, John B.
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Death of John B. Moffett.
At 9:45 a.m. Tuesday, May 30, 1899, Mr. John B. Moffett breathed his last at his home in this city, at the age of 61 years, 9 months and 24 days. He had been in feeble health the past four years, the two latter years he being confined to his room and bed. His ailment was Bright's disease from which he was an almost constant sufferer, but he bore his pain with a calmness that was surprising. During the War of the Rebellion he was a member of company G, One Hundred and Twenty-second Illinois volunteers, and was a good and faithful soldier. He was born in Somerset county, New Jersey, Aug. 6, 1837, but had lived in this state and city the greater portion of his life. He was a man who bore the esteem and confidence of all who knew him and in his business relations with men he was honest to a penny. He leaves a wife and one son, George, who have the sympathy of all in their deep affliction.
The funeral services were held at the family residence at 2 p.m., Wednesday, conducted by the Rev. E. J. Durham, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, after which the remains were interred in East cemetery under the impressive burial service of the Grand Army of the Republic, to which order he belonged.
CARD OF THANKS.
The family of the late John B. Moffett desire to return their sincerest and heartfelt thanks to the friends who assisted in the attentions shown their husband and father during his illness and to the G. A. R. who officiated at the burial.
Mrs. Amanda E. Moffett
George B. Moffett

MOORE, George W. -
(Diamond Grove Cemetery, Jacksonville)

GEORGE W. MOORE'S LONG LIFE JOURNEY IS ENDED
Death Came Wednesday Morning At 10 o'clock At State Street Residence - Veteran of Civil War and Prominent
Resident of the County.
When George W. Moore crossed the border at 10:20 o'clock Wednesday morning it was after a life journey of more than eighty-five years. Mr. Moore was born January 1, 1833, in this county and it was given to him to spend all of his long life in this county save for his years in army service.
It was only about one year ago that Mr. Moore began to evidence the weaknesses of old age and the illness which finally caused his death began about that time. In recent months there came a return of the remarkable vitality which had characterized other years and until a very few days since there was promise that this honored resident of the county would at least be able to celebrate his eighty-sixth anniversary. It is given to very few people to live so many years and to fewer people still to spend those years from childhood clear thru to old age in one community. Mr. Moore was the son of Dr. Edmund Moore and was born at the farm home six miles east of Jacksonville in the Arnold neighbor -hood. He continued to live at that farm home until November, 1915, when he became a resident of Jacksonville.
Finished College in 1856
After attending the country district school Mr. Moore became a student at Illinois College and graduated in the class of 1856 with the degree of bachelor of science. John P. Smith of 1042 West State is the only surviving member of that class. In his student days Mr. Moore was particularly interested along scientific lines and when he left college and began farming which was to occupy the business years of his life, he was still a student. He kept pace with the advancement in scientific agriculture and applied the best known principles to the development of his own farm properties.
In 1861 he heard the call to arms and as the Illinois quota was filled, along with other young men from this community he became a member of Co. G of the 1st Missouri Volunteer cavalry. He enlisted August 20, 1861, and soon afterward was chosen a lieutenant in the company. The company in its first campaign work was a part of the command of Gen. Fremont and assisted in the work of driving Gen. Sterling Price and his bushwhackers from Missouri into Arkansas.
Later there was a second campaign against General Price, under the command of Generals Curtis and Sigel. The operations of Co. G were largely directed against guerillas and bushwhackers in Missouri and Arkansas, altho the company took part in some other campaigns.
At the close of a long period of valiant service Mr. Moore returned to this, his home county, and again engaged in farming and stock raising and remained actively in this work until a very few years since.
Life Long Republican
Mr. Moore was a staunch supporter of the principles of the Republican party and thru all the years was in close touch with the party organization and accomplishment. He had been so long interested in public affairs that he knew the history of the party from its very beginning. His interest in the party was based especially upon his belief in the soundness of its principles and upon the seriousness of the work which it had done. He was only once a candidate for political office and in 1887 he as elected a member of the county board, serving for a three year term. For a period of thirty-five years he held the office of township trustee of school funds and because of his interest in educational affairs, in 1891 was appointed by Gov. Yates as one of the trustees of the Illinois School for the Blind. In all positions of a public character Mr. Moore evidenced the same carefulness and faithfulness that characterized his life in its other
relationships.
It was May 25, 1868, that Mr. Moore was married to Miss Nancy M. Chambers, the daughter of Col. and Mrs. George M. Chambers. The death of Mrs. Moore occurred in July, 1890. After leaving his farm Mr. Moore and daughter, Miss Eleanor I. Moore, who survives him, occupied the old chambers homestead at 329 West State Street, which Mr. Moore purchased just before coming to Jacksonville. It was in this home that his marriage had been solemnized in 1868 and so after leaving the old home which had sheltered him for more than four score years he entered another home which held some of the dearest memories of his youth.
Friendships With Many.
Many men have only two or three close friends all of life's journey, but Mr. Moore had friends almost without number and the intimacies lived all thru the long years. He had a distinct individual dignity which never left him, yet to old and young he accorded an unfailing courtesy and in a rare way he made the interests of those about him his interests. One could not come into contact with Mr. Moore without admiring not only the strength of character but the breadth of his vision and sympathies. He had his own well founded opinions - was ready to defend them - but he had the faculty of recognizing the mental rights of others and the sincerity of their individual views.
Mr. Moore was a man of marvelous physical vitality and the vigor of body was reflected in the strength of mind all thru the long years. He fed both mind and body and so as the later years of his life came he did not wither but continued to grow and develop. Altho he was never happier than when with war time comrades he turned back the pages of history and fought again the campaigns of the '60s, none were more interested in present day affairs nor better posted. He
followed closely the events which led up to the present world war and watched eagerly for each day's telegraphic stories of the progress of events. His interest was at the highest level when the United States became directly involved and tho in the last years failing eyesight interfered with his own reading, he listened each day as others read the lines of recent history.
Vitality is a word which really characterized his life, for it dominated in mind, in body and in soul. He lived circumspectly, and his influence was always for the better things of life. He did justly, loved mercy and walked humbly with God, and as vitality characterized his life, so did humbleness. His was a fine, strong spirit but it was under control, and with him humbleness did not mean cringing but a certain definite gentleness coupled with personal modesty. Men of the fine type of George W. Moore are few indeed and the influence of his life and work cannot rightly be told in newspaper lines.
Funeral services in his memory will be held at the family home, 829 West State Street, at 10 o'clock Friday morning in charge of Dr. F. S. Hayden, assisted by Dr. E. H. Landis. Members of the Matt Starr Post G. A. R., in which mr. Moore had long held membership will conduct the services at Diamond Grove cemetery. Friends are requested to omit flowers.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 7 Mar 1918)


MOORE, William J. - (1848-1916)

W. J. MOORE DIES BY OWN HAND TUESDAY AT DAUGHTER'S HOME
Prominent Jacksonville Citizen, Suffering from Ill Health, Ends Life by Asphyxiation - Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Gilbert Out of City.
William J. Moore was found dead at 3:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the home of his daughter, Mrs. M. E. Gilbert, 359 South Diamond street. Securing admission to the house in the absence of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert he had gone to the bathroom and turned on the gas. According to Dr. A. M. King, who was at once summoned when the suicide was discovered, Mr. Moore had been dead for two or three hours.
Mr. Moore was for many years one of Jacksonville's foremost citizens, but for the past two years or more had been out of active business. On June 1, 1914, he went to Ohio to attend the funeral of his uncle, John Moore, and seized with critical illness, underwent a major operation. His health ever since has been seriously impaired.
Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert, who left a few days since for Indianapolis by automobile, were reached by telegraph Tuesday night and sent word that they would take the earliest train possible for Jacksonville.
The body was taken to the undertaking establishment of W. W. Gilham and there prepared for burial. Coroner Wright was found to be out of the city and tho the deputy coroner could make no definite statement of time, it is probable that an inquest will be held this forenoon.
After breakfast Tuesday morning Mr. Moore went to the garden of his residence, 603 South Prairie street, and after engaging in some light work for a time, told Mrs. Moore that he would return to the house. This was the last time he was seen by members of the family.
The suicide was discovered by Lloyd Sitherwood, a clerk at Gilbert's pharmacy, who has rooms at the Gilbert home. Tuesday was mr. Sitherwood's afternoon off and it was the odor of gas noticed by him on sitting down to read in the parlor, that first aroused suspicion. Going upstairs he detected the sound of gas escaping in the bathroom.
Neighbors had by this time begun to gather. Entrance to the bathroom was secured by Officer Frank Baker, who borrowed a ladder from painters at work in the neighborhood and forced open the window from the outside. Harrison Dickson, in company with clerks at the pharmacy, forced the door and the lifeless body of Mr. Moore, fully clad was found in the bathroom floor.
Mr. Moore had evidently planned for as quick a death as possible. Stopping the ventilator and key hole with paper, he closed down the window, locked the door and pulled loose the gas pipe which supplies the heater. So far as known he left no written word.
William J. Moore was born in Batavia, O., Feb. 15, 1848 and was hence at the time of death 68 years, 3 months and 28 days old. He was the son of Lester L. and Eliza E. (Russ) Moore. After attending the schools of Batavia he went to Delaware, O., and spent a year in study at Ohio Wesleyan university.
At the age of 16 Mr. Moore enlisted in Co. B, 138th Regiment, Ohio infantry, as one of the “hundred day” men. He did guard duty at Alexandria and Petersburg.
Mr. Moore was married to Miss Almira Kain of Batavia, O., May 16, 1872, and came at once to Springfield, Ill., to make his home, removing in the fall of the same year to Jacksonville. He was then a commercial traveler but since 1873 has been a merchant. Mr. Moore was a member of the city council, being chosen to fill the unexpired term of his son, Thomas Moore, who died in office during the first administration of Mayor John R. Davis. Mr. Moore was re-elected in 1903 and served until 1905. He was a member of Matt Starr post, G.A.R., and was always active in the work of that organization. He was a member of the Methodist church, having professed faith in Christ at the age of twelve. He was class leader and a steward in the church and was at all times held in high esteem as a Christian citizen.
Surviving Mr. Moore are two children, Charles K. Moore and Louise, wife of M. E. Gilbert of this city: one brother, George E. Moore of Indianapolis, Ind., three sisters, Mrs. Laura E. Lewis, Batavia, O.; Mrs. Lizzie E. Dudley of the same city and Mrs. Ella Edwards of Los Angeles, Cal. Two children died in infancy and Mr. Moore's son, Thomas E., passed away May 18, 1901. He is survived also by his widow, mrs. Almira K. Moore.
(Jacksonville Journal, June 14, 1916)


MUEHLHAUSEN, Henry W., Sr. - (1836-1916)

HENRY W. MUEHLHAUSEN, SR, DIES AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Death Claims Old and Highly Respected Citizen at 10:40 O'clock Tuesday Evening - Funeral Sunday Afternoon.
Henry W. Muehlhausen, Sr., died Sunday evening at 10:40 o'clock at the home of his son, G. A. Muehlhausen, 324 East Morton avenue, after a lingering illness of more than a year, which had its origin in a stroke of paralysis.
Mr. Muehlhausen had been a resident of Jacksonville just fifty years and he leaves many true friends to mourn his loss. Mr. Muehlhausen's age was 79 years, 6 months and 11 days.
The funeral will be held Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at Centenary M. E. church, Rev. G. W. Flagge, pastor of the church will be in charge and Rev. W. E. Spoonts, pastor of Northminster church, will assist. Burial will be made in the family lot at Jacksonville cemetery.
Mr. Muehlhausen was born Feb. 23, 1836, in Witzenhausen, Hessen, Germany. He came to America June 1, 1854, landing in Baltimore. A young man of 18, he secured employment in a tailoring shop immediately on his arrival.
Five dollars a week was the wage received, and when by the kindness of a friend Mr. Muehlhausen was enabled to get a position which paid $12 a week, he felt for a time that sudden wealth had come to him.
On the voyage to America Mr. Muehlhausen made the acquaintance of a Jewish boy, traveling alone, Leopold Weil. During his years in Baltimore Mr. Muehlhausen prized the friendship of Mr. Weil especially as both were from the same section of Germany and spoke the same language. Without employment at the close of the Civil war, it was thru the generosity of Mr. Weil that Mr. Muehlhausen secured a position and came to Jacksonville to make his home.
Mr. Muehlhausen was married to Miss Katherine C. Metzmann of Baltimore and to them were born eight sons and three daughters. Albert, Louis and Elizabeth died in infancy and Augusta, the wife of John Berndt, passed away Aug. 16, 1888. The Surviving daughter is Mrs. Alexander Rabjohns of this city and the sons are John A. Muehlhausen of Girard, Gustav A., George, William H., Otto and Henry Muehlhausen, all of Jacksonville. Mr. Muehlhausen leaves twelve grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Mrs. Muehlhausen died Aug. 29, 1882, and Mr. Muehlhausen was later married to Mrs. Caroline Runkel, who passed away July 18, 1911.
But a short time after coming to this country Mr. Muehlhausen enlisted for military duty as did a large number of German immigrants of that day. He joined the Maryland state militia and was a member of the company which pursued and captured John Brown in the famous raid at Harper's Ferry. The entire company enlisted for service in the Civil war and as a member of Company H, First Maryland Infantry, Mr. Muehlhausen served thruout the war and tho seeing service in Gettysburg and other hard battles, he was mustered out without a wound.
Mr. Muehlhausen came to Jacksonville in 1866 and after several years in the employ of Mr. Weil took a position as cutter for Joseph Tomlinson. He later engaged in business for himself and from time to time associated with him his sons. He sold his interest to the latter May 14, 1901, when sons of Mr. Muehlhausen embarked in business as Muehlhausen Bros. and the father retired.
An Odd Fellow for many years, Mr. Muehlhausen held the distinction of being one of the oldest members of Illini lodge No. 4, I.O.O.F., and was always faithful to the tenants of the order. A man of unswerving industry and firm character, Mr. Muehlhausen pursued in life a course of steady success. He was fair and upright in all his dealings and in his passing there remains for friends and loved ones an unbroken memory of a life of good deeds.
(Jacksonville Journal, April 4, 1916)

MURRAY, George
(Click for Cemetery Inscription)

George Murray was born near Waverly, January 22, 1842, and died May 16, 1912, aged 70 years, 3 months and 24 days.
He served three years in Company "G", 16th Regiment of Illinois Infantry.
He was united in marriage to Mrs. Emily Cooper, on the 22nd day of May 1871. To this union was born three children, George Walter, Mary Mittie, and Ada Frances, who preceded him in death.
He had one step-son , J. E. Cooper, and one granddaughter, Mrs. Earnest Watts, who he reared from childhood. He leaves to mourn his loss, a wife, six grandchildren, one great grandson, besides a host of friends.
Funeral services were held in the M. E. Church, South, Saturday at 2:30 p.m., conducted by Rev. G. B. Sherman assisted by Rev. A. N. Simmons. Interment in East Cemetery.

NAGLE, John Frederick

VETERAN RESIDENT TAKEN BY DEATH
J. Fred Nagle Dies Friday Afternoon at North Main Street Home - Born in Germany 81 Years Ago - Funeral Monday Afternoon.
John Frederick Nagle quietly passed away Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock at his home 718 North Main street, after an illness which had kept him confined but little more than a week. Mr. Nagle had made this city his home since 1867 and was in his eighty second year. He was upright and honest in all his dealings and, tho unassuming in his manner of living, was widely known and highly esteemed by the many friends he had formed thru a life as useful as it was long and honorable. Mr. Nagle was for seven years a sexton of Jacksonville cemetery, retiring in 1907. His health remained good and he was well able to get about until a year ago when the infirmities of age began to claim him. Mr. Nagle was well known in lodge circles and especially did he take an interest in Masonry. He was a member of Harmony Lodge No. 3, A. F. & A. M. and was an honored member of Urania Lodge No. 243, I. O. O. F. holding membership also in Matt Starr Post, G. A. R.
Mr. Nagle was born Dec. 2, 1835, in Osterburg, Prussia, and came to this country in July, 1858, making his home in St. Louis and afterwards in Beardstown. He was for a time engaged in farm work near Meredosia and it was from the last named place that he enlisted for service in the war of the rebellion, going southward with Co. A of the 101st regiment and remaining in the service until the close of the war. He was mustered out in Washington and then went to Germany to pay a visit to his old home. He remained in the Fatherland two years and on coming to this city went to work in a planing mill. Mr. Nagle had learned the trade of cabinet making as a boy in the old country.
For twenty years he was employed by Hugh Wilson, Sr., in the mill just north of the Wabash railroad. Mr. Nagle was street commissioner in 1882, during the first term of Mayor Charles H. Widmayer. He was for a considerable time engaged in contracting and carpentry work.
In 1869 Mr. Nagle was married to Miss Elizabeth Engel and to them were born three children, Elizabeth, the wife of J. A. Hoffman of Springfield; Fred Nagle, who died Nov. 17, 1889, and Emma, the wife of John E. Hall of Meredosia.
He is survived also by eight grandchildren.
Mr. Nagle was a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, uniting with the old First Presbyterian congregation soon after coming to the city.
The funeral will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Services will be conducted by the Rev. R. B. Wilson, pastor of State street Presbyterian church, at the home of Mr. Nagle, on North Main street.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Saturday Morning, January 20, 1917 - Buried in Jacksonville East Cemetery)

NARR, Henry

Aged War Veteran Called By Death
Henry Narr, Nearly Ninety Years of Age, Died Tuesday Morning at Home of His Son, E. M. Narr
Henry C. Narr was born in Lobenstein, Germany, July 4, 1933, and died at the home of his son, Edward M. Narr, northwest of Waverly, Tuesday, May 29, 1923, after only a brief illness, death being due to a paralytic stroke.
When a young man he left the land of his nativity and came to this land of promise. He arrived in St. Louis, February 24, 1854, at which place he commenced life in America and lived for a few years.
He was married to Miss Mary Jane Jones , January 25, 1857. To this union three children were born: Mary Helen and Charles Henry, who died in their infancy, and Edward Major who survives him.
When the Civil War came on, he enlisted as a soldier in Co. G, 101st Illinois Infantry, and served as a good soldier to the end of the war. At its close he came to Waverly, which has been his home most of the years intervening up to the time of his death.
When Waverly Lodge No. 118, A. F. & A. M. was organized, March 2, 1866, Mr. Narr was a charter member and during the more than fifty years since that time he has given it enthusiastic and loyal support.
At a celebration not many years back he expressed his appreciation of Masonry in these words, "I have been a member of the Masonic Lodge for fifty years and I have never seen a day that I regretted this membership."
Mr. Narr was a wagon maker by trade, but retired from activity in this calling at the time of his wife's death in 1900. Since then he has lived at the home of his son, E. N. Narr.
He is remembered by his old friends as modest and unobtrusive in manner, but withal a citizen with sterling integrity, truth and honor. His vigor and strength of manhood was of that type that is indispensable in making any community strong.
Funeral services were held at the Christian Church Thursday morning at 10:30 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. J. N. Thomas. Two selections, "Abide With Me" and "Lead Kindly Light" were sung by Mrs. Wilson M. Smith. The pall bearers were W. L. Horstman, W. H. Graves, J. C. Deatherage, Edward Wemple, Jesse McClain and Frank Brown. The flowers were cared for by Misses Caroline Lombard, Olive Burnett, Effie Ritter and Mildred Rohrer.


NICHOLS, Samuel W.

S. W. NICHOLS, CITY'S BEST FRIEND, IS DEAD
Dies at Hospital at Eleven O'clock This Morning; City Mourns
Samuel W. Nichols' long life - a span of eighty-three years that he converted into usefulness that benefitted thousands - came to a close at 11 o'clock this morning. Within a half hour after he had breathed his last the word had traveled into business houses, school rooms and homes, and hundreds were grieved to know that the man who was known as
Jacksonville's best friend was dead.
"The Grand Old Man of Jacksonville," as Mr. Nichols was affectionately known, in view of his philanthropy, has been in failing health for several years. For several winters he had gone to Arizona to escape the disagreeable months of this climate. On each of these visits into the Southwest Mr. Nichols seemed to gain strength that carried him along until the following fall.
But two years ago he started for Tucson and became very ill at Kansas City, forcing his immediate return to Jacksonville.
Since that time he had not been as active as formerly, spending most of his time at his home on West Beecher avenue. He remained at Passavant for several months last winter.
Less than two weeks ago the veteran again became very feeble. He was removed to the hospital where his condition gradually grew weaker. In these years of declining health Mr. Nichols' mental faculties remained keen and vigorous, and although forced to remain indoors much of the time he tried to continue the numerous activities with which he identified. Jacksonville has known S. W. Nichols since 1864, and has found him a loyal and true friend, giving most liberally to community enterprises, launching new ones and supporting all movements of patriotic, civic and religious nature.
His name will always be prominently identified with the history of Jacksonville.
A Life of Giving
Mr. Nichols' unique philanthropy was begun many years ago, and the majority of the community's citizens now cannot remember some of his earliest deeds of generosity and kindness. But the middle-aged and young have heard their parents tell of Mr. Nichols' good works, and have noted some of his later gifts themselves. His generous nature, both as to individuals and the community has been continuous.
Many years ago "Uncle Sammy" took delight in taking large parties of school pupils to fairs and other places of educational interest. He also gave large community burgoos where the school children enjoyed his hospitality.
The number of young men and women who received financial encouragement from Mr. Nichols in securing educations will probably never be known. But it was large. There was no publicity attached to the help he gave students. Mr. Nichols never mentioned it himself, and if anything was said it was by grateful persons he had helped.
Friend of All Races
All races and creeds found him to be a friend. Mr. Nichols was particularly interested in aiding the colored race, and some of his staunchest friends are numbered among the colored citizens. Some of the colored churches here were formed as a result of his efforts.
Mr. Nichols' first large gift to the community was when he donated a tract of valuable land to be used for park purposes.
This tract is Nichols park. It was his financial support that made possible the erection of the nurses home at Passavant hospital, an institution in which he was greatly interested. The decedent contributed to the churches most freely, and the colleges and schools found him as a valued friend.
Several years ago he established the S. W. Nichols Christmas fund for grade school children. Through this fund social agencies now purchase several hundred dollars worth of toys and sweetmeats each Christmas, and distribute them among small boys and girls. Mr. Nichols personally directed this work at Christmas time. Last Christmas friends persuaded him to sit for a photograph among the several hundred holiday bundles that had been prepared.
It was only a year ago that the Grand Old Man announced his intentions of providing Congregational church with a set of fine chimes in memory of his mother. Mr. Nichols lived to see the installation of the chimes, and to hear their sweet tones.
Community Honored Him.
Two years ago Jacksonville realized more fully than ever before what Mr. Nichols had done for it, and a community celebration in his honor was held. There was a parade of school children and an appropriate program.
Mr. Nichols was always modest. In his autobiography he expressed what the community has always known, when he said: "Whatever trifle I have done for the city's residents or enterprises has been truly a labor of love."
He liked to do these things that the community so greatly appreciates. Mr. Nichols was never happier than when helping someone. The community owes much to this fine trait of his nature.
A veteran of the Civil War, Mr. Nichols took an active part in patriotic movement. He had held practically every office in Matt Starr Post of the G. A. R., and was adjutant at the time of his death. He saw the post dwindle from a large group of young men to a small band of white-haired veterans who are as loyal now to their organization as when its numbers were
large.
During his long residence here Mr. Nichols was engaged in several different lines of business. It was in 1886 that he and the late W. L. Fay formed partnership and launched the present Jacksonville Journal Company.
Mr. Nichols loved newspaper work, particularly writing. Though he had others at his command he liked to get out with pencil and pad and gathering the news of his fellow townsmen. He was an interesting writer, and all of his literary work was not confined to the daily. In his earlier years he wrote a number of plays and fiction articles. Often he would drive out to the rural schools, make the pupils an inspirational talk, and then write an interesting narrative of his visit for his paper.
Mr. Nichols was actively associated with the newspapers until a few years ago, when his health forced him to retire.
The remains of Mr. Nichols were prepared for burial at the Gillham Funeral Home.
Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Congregational Church.
In 1926 he wrote an autobiography, and this today was secured for publication. Mr. Nichols' own account of his life and some of his impressions follows:
Autobiography
My father was Rev. Warren Nichols, son of James Nichols, a sturdy New England farmer, whose family for several generations had lived in Reading, Mass., twelve miles from Boston. He graduated from Williams college in 1830 and from Andover Theological seminary in 1833.
My mother was Ann M. Morril, daughter of Hon. Samuel Morril, cashier of a savings bank in Concord, N. H. He had been a member of the legislature and his brother was at one time governor of the state. They were married in September 1833, and immediately started for the west, having with them Miss Hannah Fayerweather, a sweet young woman of sixteen who later became wife of President J. M. Sturtevant of Illinois College.
They settled in St. Charles, Mo., but a year later moved to western Illinois where my father served various churches, both Presbyterian and Congregational, though he regarded himself a Presbyterian, for fifteen years and during that time I am proud to say, he acted with the forces of the underground railroad, helping fugitive slaves on their way to freedom. In company with the famous Dr. David Nelson author of the beautiful hymn, "Shining Shore" he taught in an academy in Adams county for a time.
Born Near Quincy
Near Quincy, Feb. 5, 1844, I appeared on the scene. My father had two brothers who moved west a little while before him: they were Dr. Adams Nichols, pioneer physician who had no children, and Rev. Cyrus Nichols who preached the first sermon ever delivered in a Presbyterian church in Racine, Wis. That was in 1829 and he left several children all of
whom are dead.
His health greatly prostrated by the hardships encountered by working his way while getting an education, and by the conditions of his calling and the climate, my father thought the bracing air of Pennsylvania would benefit him and with a big spring wagon and three horses we started one bright morning in 1849. Our last home was in LaHarpe, Hancock county, and I well remember the long lines of oxen drawn wagons which passed through the place on their way to California.
That journey I shall never forget while I live. We had 150 miles of corduroy road which is a highway graded up somewhat and poles laid across it with no dirt between, so the jolting may easily be imagined.
I well remember how glad we were one morning when we were told that but thirteen miles more of corduroy road awaited us. I think it was in Indiana. When we reached Ohio My father was persuaded to end his journey in Delaware county, and we lived for three in Muskingum when failing health compelled my father to give up preaching and we moved to Allen county northwestern part of the state, where my father died in Lima, the county seat.
After serving a time in the Army of the Potomac, I decided to make Jacksonville, Illinois, my home as my mother was somewhat acquainted in this region and I wished to enter college and we arrived in this city Nov. 11, 1864, the date later selected for a great storm and still later for Armistice anniversary.
Never was a man blessed with a better mother than I and to her precious memory I would pay a well deserved tribute for she was all the world to me. My father would have left nothing to be desired had he lived, but that was not to be.
My days in Illinois College are among the happy memories of my life. My association with the grand men of those days were beneficial in every way, and I would here record the great value of their devoted efforts for the welfare of the students of the institution. While my love for the Phi Alpha Literary society is unusual and I think I have an unequaled record for attending the first fall meetings of the society for sixty-two years without missing one, and only missing three
last meetings caused by European travel.
I didn't attend the full four years of my course but was later voted an alumnus by the faculty.
In the summer of 1866, I entered the Jacksonville Business College, was its first graduate and second teacher of bookkeeping, but I resigned at the end of a year as I didn't like the business. For nearly three years I was treasurer and collector of the Jacksonville Coke Company and there was associated with some of the grand men of the city, notably Jos. O. King, the wonderfully capable superintendent. He was a remarkable man. The first works were a swindle from start to finish as no one here was capable of seeing that they were erected properly.
Although educated as a business man and conducting a clothing store at the time, Mr. King took hold of the enterprise, studied the theory of gas manufacturing, educated John McDonald in the mechanical department and with the receipts of the company rebuilt the works from start to finish with the possible exception of some of the mains which the contractor had to have of iron all right.
Helped Build Waterworks
Jacksonville had no waterworks and while a firm was here putting in a new holder for the gas company Mr. King solely, alone, started the movement for a system of waterworks. Prof. Crampton of Illinois College, Robert White, a student, and I made the first survey ever made for the purpose. We started somewhere near the present site of the pumping works and took the elevation to the hill where is now the stand pipe and it was 106.48 feet.
The troubles we encountered getting the waterworks built seem now like a dream. There was an element determined to thwart the enterprise. Two or three times the vote to go ahead and issue bonds was carried only to be set back by non- progressive city fathers.
Once when it seemed sure and safe, a good, honest granger was elected to the city council and gave the deciding vote for postponement and a company of men from the east part of the city went to his home in the fourth ward and serenaded him for his patriotic course in keeping Jacksonville from having waterworks.
When the vote was left undisturbed the next question was as to the needs of the city and some optimists decided that the time would come when 130,000 gallons a day would be required though it would be a good while hence. Water closets were not then in use and the good men would have been surprised had they been told that the city would need nearly a million not so very many years hence.
Entered Hardware Business
A good part of the year 1870 I served the First National bank and beginning 1871 the firm of Nichols, Brennan and Co., went into the stove and tinware and sheet metal business. The other members of the firm were Terrence Brennan and Joe DeSilva. The latter left the firm soon after the end of a year and the other two continued till May, 1875, when Mr. Brennan retired and was succeeded by John G. Grierson and John R. Loar. That firm dissolved and sold out in the latter part of 1876 and in May, 1877, I formed a partnership with L. K. Clendenon, conducting a photograph gallery in the second story of the building now occupied by the Kresge store till May 1886, when that partnership was dissolved.
Part Owner of Journal
Some years before that I began writing for the Journal and in Dec. 1884 I went regularly on the staff serving as local editor with an assistant till May, 1886, when I gave up my gallery altogether and devoted all my time to the paper and Nov. 22nd, 1886, the Journal Company was born and took hold of the business which was in the hands of Wm. L. Fay and S. W.
Nichols.
Mr. Fay was in many ways a remarkable man. Gifted with unusual judgment in the mechanical as well as the literary departments and a man of keen insight his counsels were frequently sought by many. It was ever our desire and effort to furnish the news in the best manner possible and at the same time publish a paper that a man could always hand to his children without first examining it himself.
During February, 1920, I had an attack of old time influenza and it left me with a chronic bronchitis and later on a muscular weakness of my heart developed and I have been laid on the shelf, but have enjoyed the loving ministrations of dear daughter, now Mrs. Frances Wright, who has done all in her power to make my life comfortable and happy and with her husband, who has also been kind to me, has made my last days as pleasant as possible.
My precious mother left me Feb. 22, 1871. Dec. 30, 1873 I was married to Miss Helen M. Storrs of Amherst, Mass.
Together we trod the path of life happily till Jan. 15, 1887 when she was taken from me. Jan. 15, 1916, I was married to Mrs. Elizabeth English who was spared to me only till Dec. 11, 1920, when the Master called for her. One little one whom my wife and I took to our hearts and home in March, 1880, was taken from us in a little more than a year. I had no brothers and on only sister died at the home of her son in Portland, Oregon.
Joined Congregational Church
Soon after our arrival in this city my mother and I united with the Congregational church and there cluster some of my most tender associations. The good people of that organization have ever been a blessing to me in many ways.
In June, 1871, I was made a Free and Accepted Mason in Harmony Lodge No. 3 of this place, and I think I am the oldest active member in point of years of membership. I am also a member of Jacksonville Chapter, No. 3, Royal Arch Masons, of which I was High Priest six years and am also a member of Hospitaller Commandery, No. 31, Knights Templar. I am
also a member of Matt Starr Post, Grand Army of the Republic of which I am a past commander and at present an adjutant.
Soon after my arrival in Jacksonville I became interested in the colored churches of the city and was for sometime superintendent of both the Baptist and Methodist church Sunday schools, but when the former changed the hour of meeting till afternoon I remained with the Methodists for 28 years and when all was prosperous and harmonious I resigned and such great objection were made that I compromised by reviewing the lessons each quarter so that I was associated with the school 32 years.
For thirty years I served as lay preacher, helping churches out of a minister, acting, as I told them, as a cipher to fill a vacant place.
Interested in Dramatics.
One of the pleasant experiences of my life has been my association with amateur dramatic entertainments. About 1867 a play, "Still Waters Run Deep," was presented for the benefit of the Phi Alpha society of Illinois college. Major George M. McConnel was a leading character and manager and a capable one, too. "London Assurance," one of the greatest amateur successes ever presented in this place, was staged with Miss Belle Osgood, teacher at the State School for the Deaf, as the bright particular star, and she won great honors.
Up to that time all the plays had to be in Strawn's hall which merely had a bare platform and we had to construct a stage which was a good deal of work, so the Odeaon Hall Directory was organized with Dr. G. V. Black, I think, first president.
I was secretary and treasurer. We leased the quarters now occupied by the Woodmen and erected a stage with four scenes painted by William Benson.
This stirred up Jacob Strawn, Jr., long since dead, to place in his hall a complete theatrical outfit, and our club opened it with "Passing Cloud," a find old play. We put on several others and in 1876 the leadership of the dramatic club fell to me and we staged a number of plays. In the summer of '87 the Strawn stage was destroyed by fire and Mr. Chambers had erected in his West State street block a regular stage which we used a number of times. I wrote several plays which were used with a fair degree of success.
I started one in vacation, but one after another of the cast dropped out till but nine were left. The play was given up, but I told the young people I would take them for a day's outing in Springfield which was done, and again came a wail at the idea of giving up, so we formed a club which lasted for six happy years. Each winter I would write a play suited to our number and present it to an invited audience. We took a large excursion to Chicago or some distant point each year, once going to the head of navigation on Lake Michigan. That club was one of the dearest experiences of my life.
Friend of Hospitals
During the fall of 1874 I became acquainted with Dr. Passavant when he came here to establish the hospital bearing his name. The property was the gift of that blessed saint, Mother Ayers, mother of the founders of the bank bearing their name and it was my privilege to be interested in that noble work for more than fifty years till failing health compelled me
to withdraw. I often wonder if the spirits of those precious ones, Sister Louise and Sister Caroline, first in charge, ever hover over the place where they gave so freely of their skill and untiring devotion. Jacksonville has ever been a dearly beloved home to me. The good people of the place have always been most kind and affectionate, helping me when I much needed assistance and encouraging me always. About it cluster the most hallowed associations of my life and the welfare of the city and its people has ever been most dear to me and whatever trifle I have done its residents or enterprises has been truly a labor of love.
(Jacksonville Courier, dtd. Oct. 24, 1927)

NICKEL, Charles
 (See Cemetery Listing)

Charles Nickel, one of Concord's oldest and most honored residents, passed away at his home northeast of the village
Thursday evening at 9:15 o'clock following an illness of three months with hardening of the arteries. Mr. Nickel was a veteran of the civil war and until the time of retiring from active work was engaged in farming.
Four children survive Mr. Nickel: F. C. Nickel, John Nickel, Edward Nickel and Mrs. Henry Roberts, all residing in the Concord vicinity. Mrs. Nickel passed away about twelve years ago. Mr. Nickel was a faithful member of the German Methodist church.
The funeral will be held Monday afternoon from the M. E. church of Concord and burial will be made in Concord cemetery.
(Jackksonville Daily Journal, March 3, 1917)
CONCORD
Once more we are called to mourn the death of one of Concord's old veterans. The death of Charles Nickel takes from us a good citizen and one of the six old soldiers in this precinct. The five surviving are as follows: A. W. McConnell, John Filson, E. P. Taylor, Milton Ham and L. L. Rexroat. One by one they are answering the last roll call. Comrades Cowdin and Sanders preceded Comrade Nickel but a few months.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, March 8, 1917)

NUNNELLY, Joseph A.

Joseph A. Nunnelly, civil war veteran, and a resident of Morgan county since 1878, passed away at 4:40 p.m. Thursday, July 14, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Albert Spires, in Jacksonville. The aged veteran had been seriously ill for the past month.
Mr. Nunnelly was born in Montgomery county, Mo., December, 25, 1841, the son of William and Lavinia Nunnelly. He left the home farm in 1861 to enlist in the First Missouri regiment, in which he served for nearly four years under the commands of General Pendleton and General Price.
In 1874 Mr. Nunnelly went to Raymond, Ill., in Montgomery county, at which place he was united in marriage with Mrs. Margaret Spaenhower in 1875. In 1878 Mr. and Mrs. Nunnelly moved to Waverly where they made their home until the death of Mrs. Nunnelly in April 1921. Since that time the husband has made his home with his daughter in Jacksonville.
The decedent was a member of the Congregational Church at Waverly, serving as caretaker for 38 years. During this long period he was absent from his duties but ten Sundays. For a number of years Mr. Nunnelly also acted as caretaker of the First National Bank and Wemple Bros. Bank.
Surviving are one daughter, Mrs. Spires, of Jacksonville; one brother, Henry Nunnelly of New Florence, Mo., one step-daughter, Mrs. George Sample of Jacksonville; three step-sons, Amos and William Spainhower, Waverly, and Oliver Spainhower, East St. Louis.
The remains were brought to Waverly Saturday morning, and funeral services held in the First Congregational church at 10 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. J. B. Houser. Music was furnished by Mrs. L. T. Seales, Mrs. F. H. Curtiss, F. H. Curtiss and W. R. Turnbull. The pall bearers were A. C. Moffet, A. W. Reagel, E. B. Wyle, W. L. Horstman, L. T. Seales and H. I. DeTurk. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Russell Thorne, Misses Bess Bradford and Marjorie Lombard. Interment was in East Cemetery.
(July 22, 1927)

OSBORN, William Thomas

William Thomas Osborn, eldest son of James and Rachel Etherton Osborn, was born in Taylor County, Ky., November 13, 1843, and died at his home in Waverly, Ill., Thursday, January 28, 1926, at the age of 82 years, 2 months and 15 days.
He enlisted in Co. H, 13th Kentucky Infantry, at the age of eighteen and served three years in the Civil War. He was captured at Munfordsville, Ky., and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio. After a short time he was paroled and allowed to return to his home. At the expiration of his parole, he rejoined his regiment and went as far as Atlanta, Ga., on Sherman's March to the Sea. His time expiring, he was discharged and allowed to return home. Although his relatives and friends were Southern sympathizers, he stood true to his convictions, and entered the Northern army, and, at the battle of Munfordsville, where he was captured, his brother was aiding the Confederate forces. It being the only battle where the two brothers met.
He was married to Sarah Elizabeth Curry, August 8, 1865, who preceded him in death, November 22, 1919. To this union three children were born. Katherine, at home; William W., of Berkeley, California, and Mrs. C. H. Walters of Waverly.
He was converted in Kentucky while still a young man and joined the M. E. church. He came to Illinois in 1881 and settled near Maxwell. He joined the Providence Presbyterian church. His membership remained there till 1902, when he moved to Waverly and placed his letter in the First Congregational church.
He enjoyed his church services very much and was a faithful attendant until he lost his hearing and gave up regular attendance.
Waverly was his post office for 44 years. He became a member of the Masonic order in 1867. He was Commander of John W. Ross Post No. 331, G. A. R. Department of Illinois at the time of his death.
Besides the three children mentioned, he leaves five granddaughters, two great grandsons; one brother, John B. Osborn, Miami, Ky.; several nieces and nephews and a host of loyal friends and neighbors.
Funeral services were conducted Sunday afternoon, January 31, at 2:00 o'clock, at the First M. E. Church, by Rev. A. R. Wassell. Music was furnished by Mrs. L. T. Seales, Mrs. F. H. Curtiss, Messrs. F. H. Curtiss and W. R. Turnbull. The pall bearers were W. H. Rohrer, C. F. Wemple, George Alderson, W. L. Horstman, S. W. Rodgers and H. I. DeTurk. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Dorothea Schramm, Mrs. Fern Peters, Misses Dorothy Harris, Cora VanWinkle, Eunice VanWinkle, Ella Smedley, Mary Narr and Edith Graves.
The local Masonic lodge had charge of the services at East Cemetery.

OSBORNE, John T.

DEATH SUMMONS JOHN T. OSBORNE HERE THURSDAY
Veteran Citizen and Business Man of Community Passes Away After Extended Illness.
One of Jacksonville's best citizens and pioneers, John T. Osborne, passed away at his home at 845 North Church street yesterday afternoon after an illness of several months. Mr. Osborne suffered ill health five years ago and during the past two years he has been confined to his home. He was able, however, to get about his home until the last few days when his illness became critical.
Mr. Osborne has spent all of his life in Jacksonville and Morgan county, aggregating a life time of more than four score years. Jack, as he was known by his closes friends, was born 10 miles east of the city, in a log cabin, his parents, David W. and Ellen F. Osborne being early pioneers in this section of the country. He was born November 21, 1846, reaching the advanced age of more than 80 years at his death.
He was married to Mary Augusta Hicks on November 23, 1867, who with two sons, Ernest of Los Angeles, Cal., and Percy of New York City, survive. Another child was born but died in infancy. The following brothers and sisters survive: C. A. and D. W. Osborne of this city; George W. and S. M. of Tacoma, Wash.; Mrs. W. E. Gant, Hardin, Mo.; Mrs. E. L. Hockaday, Auburn, Wash., and Mrs. Newton McWilliams, Tacoma, Washington.
Mr. Osborne had been engaged in the dry goods business in this city for over fifty years, first starting as a clerk in the Jonathan Gill store which was at one time located where the F. J. Waddell Co., is now located. He later was associated with the J. M. T. King establishment and finally with the Phelps & Osborne Dry Goods company where he served until ill health forced him to retire. Early in life Osborne became affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and for more than fifty years was prominent in the activities of Urania lodge of this city.
Several months ago at a special meeting he was presented with a 50 year jewel in recognition of his long membership and fine service in the lodge.
He served as secretary of Urania for many years, and was also state representative for his lodge at one period. He held membership in Ridgely Encampment.
Mr. Osborne was a member of the 145th Illinois Infantry in the war of the rebellion, spending almost a year in the service. He was a member of the Central Christian church and took an active part in its activities. As a citizen Mr. Osborne ranked high in the confidence and respect of the people who knew him, being broad minded, public spirited and liberal in the work of the community.
Preparations for the funeral will be made at the Williamson Funeral Home where the body has been removed. Final arrangements await the arrival of the son from New York.
(Jacksonville Courier, dtd. 21 Jan. 1911)

PARKER, M. V. - (1832-1916) -
Click for CEMETERY READING

(The death year is not the same in the Cemetery readings, possibly the stone was misread or this isn't the same person??)
M.V. Parker of this city died at the Soldiers' Home in Quincy Wednesday evening at the age of nearly 84 years.
He was born in Cashocton county, Ohio, June 30, 1832 and came to this state with his parents when a small child.
He spent a good part of his life in Fulton county and later came to this county where he has since resided. He was twice married, his last wife having died two years ago. He is survived by a son and daughter and a niece, Mrs. R.
Whitney, 324 Wolcott street, where he has made his home since the death of his wife. He enlisted in the union army in August 1862 and served thruout the war as a good soldier.
Capt. John E. Wright expected to go to Quincy today to bring back the remains and brief services will be held at the home of Mrs. Whitney after which the body will be taken to Murrayville where the funeral will be conducted in the
M. E. church and interment will be in old Bethel cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, February 18, 1916)

PRICE, Louis

"Uncle" Louis Price Goes to His Reward.
In the death of "Uncle Louis Price there is removed from us one who, lonely and with few intimate friends, was nevertheless greatly loved by the public as a whole, and one who will be missed by those who have grown accustomed to drop a kindly word when they saw him.
Little is known of the life of "Uncle" Louis and the stories that are told by citizens who knew him for many years are more or less conflicting. He was a slave before the war, and according to one story was married and had several children at the time the war broke out, stories conflict as to the nature of his work while a slave, but it seems that at times he was a house servant and at other times put to work in the field. Mr. Price always spoke, however, of the good treatment he received from the different masters he served.
He had no idea of the date he was born, but said his birthplace was in Kentucky, he was sold and taken to Missouri and later to Texas. When the war broke out he enlisted as a cook for an officer of the Union army. He came to Waverly shortly after the close of the war where he resided until last September when he was taken to the county farm. He was married twice after coming to Waverly, his first wife dying, and his second returning to her home after he became too feeble to care for her.
For several years "Uncle" Louis has been unable to work and has been cared for by the county and by friends. He was nearly blind and there was little of this world's interests that gave him pleasure. His greatest joy was when his pastor would come to his home and talk and read to him from the Holy Scriptures.
He belonged to the Baptist church, and was strong in his faith in Christ. Tho frail in body, his last years were nevertheless an inspiration to others, and many times has it been said since his death that "he was a good old man."
"Uncle" Louis died at the county hospital last Sunday, and in compliance with his last request, his body was brought to Waverly and laid to rest by the side of his wife in East cemetery. The funeral was held Tuesday morning at the Baptist church in charge of Rev. E. C. Lucas of the Christian church, Mr. Aldrich the Baptist pastor being out of the city.
(August 8, 1913)

RANKIN, James Stevens

James Stevens Rankin, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Rankin was born in Londonderry township, Guernsey Co., Ohio, on March 11, 1824. His father died when he was a small child, and his mother being
left with nine children and a very small farm, he was adopted by his grandparents James and Elizabeth Stevens. He was of a religious temperament and was converted at an early age. Upon his conversion he
united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and for over fourscore years he remained an earnest member of that church.
In his early manhood he came to Illinois and lived in various places in this state, locating in Waverly about eighteen years ago.
Mr. Rankin was married three times. The first time was to Miss Catherine A. Decker, of Guernsey Co., Ohio, on December 28, 1850. To this union there were born three children: John William of Salem,
Oregon; Joseph H. of Champaign; and Mrs. William Newberry of this city. This wife died in October 1855.
He was married the second time to Miss Mary Linegar of Atlanta, on June 3, 1856. This union was dissolved by death in October 1858.
His last marriage was to Malinda Ellen Jones of Ripley, on January 3, 1861. Her death occurred June 9, 1908. To this union there were born seven children, all of them surviving him with the exception
of one daughter, Mrs. Clara May Parrick. The living children are: James M. of Pleasant Hill, Oregon; Franklin A. of Waverly; Mrs. Mary Ellen Gary of Santa Anna, California; Mrs. Emma Belle McLaughlin
of Jacksonville; Mrs. Effie Viola Smithey of Goss, Mo.; and Mrs. Lucy Olive McKee of Waverly. He is also survived by one brother, William Rankin of Oklahoma, and twenty-three grandchildren, also twenty-one great grandchildren. Mr. Rankin has been in failing health for the past year, and for the past six months has been unable to leave the house. Nine weeks ago he was compelled to remain in bed, and from that time forward was confined to his bed continuously. Mr. Rankin was a devout and conscientious Christian, kind and loving husband and father, a hard working, industrious citizen, always doing right as near as he understood the right.
The funeral services were held at the First Methodist Episcopal Church Wednesday at 2:30 p.m., in charge of Rev. J. S. Smith assisted by Rev. Fred R. Johnson. Interment was in the East cemetery.

RANSDELL, John P. - (1841-1916)

John P. Ransdell passed away at his home 229 West College avenue at 6 o'clock Saturday morning after a long and tedious illness. Mr. Ransdell was born at the well known homestead, “Prairie View,” six miles southeast of the city January 29, 1841 and was the son of Eli and Anna Graff Ransdell. He was reared on the farm and attended school as far as practicable. He was a member of Co. K, 101st Ill. Infantry and had a good record as a soldier doing his duty faithfully and bravely. On his return home he went to the farm and carried it on successfully till some twelve years ago when he removed to the city where he has since resided.
Mr. Ransdell was an upright, honorable man whose word was always as good as gold. He was successful in his business and respected by all who knew him.
His parents and only sister, Mrs. Lutie Boston died some years ago. He is survived by his wife, one nephew, W. E. Boston and one niece, Mrs. Jos. Robinson.
He was a member of Matt Starr post, G. A. R.
The funeral will be conducted at the family residence, 229 West College avenue at 2:30 p.m., Monday, in charge of Rev. M. L. Pontius. Burial will be in Diamond Grove Cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, November 19, 1916)

RAY, Felix G.

Old Soldier Passes Away.
Felix G. Ray Died August 30.
Funeral Services Held at YoungBlood Church and Interment at Waverly.
Felix G. Ray was born in Elizabethtown, Ky., October 19, 1843 and died August 30, 1917. With his parents he removed to Illinois in early childhood and was a resident of Morgan county the remainder of his life.
He enlisted in Co. B, 26th Illinois Regiment in 1864 and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. He was a member of the Waverly Post of the G. A. R.
Mr. Ray was married to Sarah E. Charles July 10, 1870. He leaves to mourn his departure, beside his wife, five children, namely: Jennie Jolly, Ella Burnett, Lottie Burnett, Elmer Ray and Anna Ditson, one
daughter, Laura Hughes, preceding him in death in 1906. There also survive one sister, Mrs. Susan Eldridge, one half brother, Wm. Irvin of Prentice, one half brother, Lewis Irvin of Brock, Neb.; eighteen grandchildren and three great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at Young Blood church by Rev. Roy March of Murrayville, Saturday, at 11 a.m. Interment was in East cemetery in Waverly with a short service by Rev. W. J. Campbell, pastor
of the Baptist church.


RAY, William Everment

The subject of this sketch was born in Cable Co., Virginia, Oct. 10, 1822; died Oct. 11, 1903 at the age of 81 yrs. and 1 day.
He was converted when 15 years of age at a camp meeting which was conducted at Franklin by Elijah Carrington and Peter Cartwright. He united with the M. E. church, but some years ago withdrew from
that church and joined the M. E. church, south, of which he was an honored member until he was changed into the church Triumphant.
He loved the old forms and customs that were in vogue when he was converted. He was of a quiet unassuming disposition but his convictions on matters of religion were clear and decided. His last testimony
was that his trust was in the Lord and that all was well. Also, that while he had not lived and done as others, yet he had tried to live an honest, sincere life before his god, and his fellow men.
He leaves behind, a wife, Mary C. Ray, and two children, Mrs. Jno. Jones and Chas. N. Ray; three brothers and two sisters, Benjamin P., Elijah and Newton and Evaline McMahon and Sarah Ray, also, many true and tried friends.
The funeral was held in the M.E. church, south, under the pastor.
(Oct. 16, 1903)

READ, James Hughey
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

James Hughey Read, son of John T. and Susanna J. Read, was born in Butler county, Kentucky, May 13, 1846, being the third child in a family of ten children, of whom but three are now living, as follows: Mrs. Mary Jones of Lexington, Mo., Wm. Read of Loami, Ill., and Abram Read, of Whitehall, Ill. His father was a capable blacksmith, and hearing of the many opportunities in Illinois, brought his family to this county, when James was four years old and settled in Franklin, where for some years he followed his trade.
Here, at the age of seven years under the instruction of the Hon. John I. Rinaker, now of Carlinville, he received his first instruction in the public schools. In 1864, when nearly eighteen years of age he enlisted in Co. C, 145th Ill. Infantry Volunteers, under the command of Col. Lackey, of Macon county, and served until honorably discharged at Camp Butler at the end of the war.
Following the war he was engaged in farming near Franklin for many years. He was married to Miss Martha A. Brewer, Jan. 21, 1869, who with the following children; Fred, Alice, Fannie and Wilburn, who live near Franklin, Walter, of Rockville, Mo., and Mrs. Flora Walker, of Menard county, survive him.
About forty years ago he united with the Franklin Methodist Episcopal church, of which he remained a member until his death. Mr. Read died at the home of his daughter, Alice, (now Mrs. Chas. Mulch of Franklin,) Feb. 2, 1908, at the age of 61 years, 8 months and 19 days.
The funeral services were held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Mulch, Tuesday, at 2 p.m., conducted by Rev. Flagge, pastor of the M. E. church, and the body was laid away by the members o

RICHARDSON, James F.

James F. Richardson was born in Virginia Nov. 15, 1829 and died at his home in this city Nov. 28, 1902. When he was but twelve years old he moved to Tennessee with his parents. He was converted at the age of 15 years, and some years after united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a member of that church most of his Christian life. On June 10, 1850, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Taylor. They had nine children born to them, one dying in infancy - five sons and three daughters survive him. Of these children all but two were present at the funeral - Frank of Leavenworth, Kansas, and Mrs. Sue Knight, of Louisville, Ky., who, on account of illness in their families, were unable to be present.
At the call of his country in time of its peril he enlisted in the Third Kentucky Infantry Volunteers, Nov. 4, 1861. He took part in the following battles: Perryville, Ky.; Murfreesboro, Tenn.; Chickamauga,
Tenn.; Missionary Ridge, Tenn.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Atlanta, Ga.; and Nashville, Tenn. He received an honorable discharge from the army Jan. 10, 1865, after which he came to this city, where he has since resided. He was a charter member of John W. Ross Post No. 331, G.A.R., and was always foremost in any movement beneficial to that order.
At 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 30, the remains were escorted from the family residence to the Methodist Episcopal church by the local Grand Army post, where the funeral service was conducted by Rev. T. D. Smith, pastor of that church, in the presence of a large congregation, many being unable to gain admission into the sanctuary.
At the East cemetery a large concourse of sympathizing friends awaited the arrival of the funeral cortege, where the impressive burial service was read by Commander James M. Joy, followed by an eloquent prayer and a few appropriate remarks on the life and character of the deceased.
"Uncle Jim," as he was familiarly and affectionately known to all our citizens, will be sadly missed in this community, where for many years his genial face and kindly manner had become so familiar to both old and yong. His was an affectionate and sunny nature that cannot be replaced at the family fireside or in his intercourse with our people. The bereaved wife and children truly have the sympathy of the entire
community.
The pall bearers, all comrades in the Grand Army were: James M. Chambers, W. T. Osborn, Levi Berry, Timothy Jones, C. Romang, Patrick Maher.
(Dec. 4, 1902 - The Enterprise)

RICHARDSON, Samuel L.

Samuel L. Richardson, son of John and Mary Richardson, was born one and one half miles east of Palmyra, December 1, 1845. He with three sisters and four brothers remained on the home farm until he
grew to manhood. In the year 1873 he was united in marriage to Miss Martha M. Tongate of Palmyra, to which union four children were born, two boys and one girl dying in infancy and one daughter, Mrs. J. L. Adcock of Waverly, surviving.
In the year 1905 he with his wife moved to Waverly, where he made his home until death, which occurred Wednesday September 3, at 2:30 a.m.
When eighteen years of age he enlisted in the service of his country during the Civil War, willing and anxious to aid his country in every way possible. He was a member of the John W. Ross Post, G. A. R.,
and the Masonic lodge, and for many years enjoyed the comradeship of these orders.
Mr. Richardson united with the Christian church in his early boyhood days, being brought up under the influence of a good Christian father and mother, and lived a consistent, Christian life, attending church
services when health permitted.
He leaves to mourn his departure his wife, one daughter, and one granddaughter, Eva Mae Adcock, of whom he was very fond; also many friends.
In losing Mr. Richardson from our midst his family loses a devoted husband and father, and the community a sympathetic, Christian citizen. He was called rom this life without warning, but we feel as
though no one was better prepared to be called in that manner. He was liked by all, always considering making and keeping friends a part of his mission in this life.
Funeral services were held at the Christian church Friday, September 5, at 2 p.m. in charge of the
pastor, Rev. W. F. Huff. Members of the G. A. R. and Masonic lodge attended in a body, and the latter had charge of the services at East cemetery.
(Sept. 5, 1919)

RING, James M. - (1833-1916)

JAMES M. RING'S LONG LIFE CLOSED SUNDAY
Deceased came to This State More Than Sixty Years Ago - Veteran of the War - Funeral This Afternoon.
James M. Ring for many years a resident of Jacksonville, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. T. A. Ebrey, 700 South Diamond street Sunday morning at 9 o'clock after a brief illness. Mr. Ring has been in his usual health until about a week ago when he contracted a severe cold which developed into pneumonia and this was the cause of death.
James M. Ring was the son of Richard and Anna Cully Ring, and was born at Liberty, Ind., July 23, 1833, and was at the time of death 83 years, 4 months and 24 days old. Sixty-one years ago Mr. Ring came to Illinois and this state has been his residence almost all of the time since then with the exception of a few years spent in Missouri.
He was united in marriage April 1, 1869 to Hattie E. Howard at Lawrence, Kan. To this union three children were born, two of whom died in infancy. He is survived by one daughter, Mrs. T. A. Ebrey. His wife preceded him in death April 1, 1916. Since that time he has made his home with his daughter.
For many years he was engaged in business in this city. For a number of years before retiring from active business life he was in the pump business and had headquarters in the basement of the Yates building next door to the Journal office.
When the Civil war started Mr. Ring enlisted in 27th Reg. Ill. Volunteer infantry. He was a member of Matt Star Post G. A. R., and a member of Illini Lodge No. 4, I. O. O. F. Mr. Ring lived an honest and upright life and had a host of friends in this community.
Funeral services will be held from Centenary church this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of the Rev. E. L. Fletcher.
Burial will be in Diamond Grove cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, December 19, 1916)

ROHRER, Wilburn G.

Funeral Services Held Last Saturday for Wilburn G. Rohrer Who Died at Age of 88 Years.
The funeral services of Wilburn G. Rohrer, whose death was announced last week, were held at Rohrer Chapel at 10:30 o'clock last Saturday morning. Mr. Rohrer, though nearly ninety years old, had spent
his entire life in the community south of Waverly, known as the Rohrer Chapel community. He was born April 2, 1835, the same year that Waverly was surveyed as a townsite, his birthplace being one-quarter mile north of his late residence, on the farm now owned by J. J. Sims. He was 88 years, 8 months and 10 days of age at the time of his death. Mr. Rohrer's father was Jonathan Rohrer who was born at Harper's Ferry, Virginia. At the age of four years, Jonathan Rohrer moved to Kentucky, where he resided until he reached maturity, coming to Morgan County, Illinois, in 1827 and locating in the southeastern part of the county.
He resided in various places in this vicinity until his death in February, 1879. Wilburn G. Rohrer was one of a family of seven, there being three other sons and three daughters.
Beginning life at an early day in this community's development he soon took an active part in the worth while affairs of life. After attending college he returned home and became the first teacher of a newly organized district school near his home. He soon gave up teaching, having become interested in live stock and farming and during the remainder of his long life was one of Morgan county's well known and
successful farmers. The farm on which he resided was part of the land that was pre-empted by his father. Mr. Rohrer was married March 4, 1858, to Miss Susan Keplinger. To this union one child was born, Mrs. Fannie Curtiss, of Waverly, who survives. On September 8, 1860 death entered his home and took his young wife. On February 28, 1866, he was married to Miss Lucy A. Allyn. To this union four children were born, Luther R., who died in July, 1893; Mrs. Flora Lee Christopher who died October 14, 1897, and Oscar A. and Wilburn Herbert who survive. Deceased is also survived by four grandchildren, Mrs. A. C. Blancke, of Chicago, daughter of Mrs. Fannie Curtiss; Gertrude Elizabeth, Helen Lucy and Esther Alice Rohrer, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Rohrer. There are also two sisters surviving, Mrs. Mary Pugh and Mrs. Louise Fletcher. Death came into the home of the deceased, and took his companion of old age and since that time he has been waiting for the summons to call him home. During his declining years there was much that Mr. Rohrer loved to talk about, that which lay closest to his heart being his church. Owing to his early Christian training he was connected in early manhood and united with the church near Vancil Temple known as Brush College or Old Zion. He remained a member of that church until it was abandoned in 1876 when the society was transferred to its new home at Rohrer Chapel of which he was one of the builders, remaining a regular attendant and liberal supporter until his death. He was a member of this society for 68 years. Mr. Rohrer offered himself for service in 1862 in the Civil War, but owing to ill health was discharged in 1863 from Mount City hospital.
Funeral services were conducted at 10:30 last Saturday morning at Rohrer Chapel, Rev. E. J. Campbell of Taylorville, a former pastor, officiating, assisted by Rev. C. W. Andrew, pastor of the Waverly
M. E. Circuit.
Music was furnished by Mrs. W. A. Barrow, Mrs. J. H. Shutt, W. L. Carter and C. A. Carter of East St. Louis. They sang at the church "Abide With Me", "Gathering Home", and "Face to Face", and at the cemetery the quartet sang "Now the Day is Over."
The beautiful floral tributes were in charge of Mrs. Paul Allyn, Mrs. C. A. Carter, Mrs. W. L. Carter, Mrs. E. C. Keplinger, Mrs. J. R. Dunseth, Mrs. Oliver Miller, Mrs. Roy Sims.
Interment was made in Ease cemetery at Waverly, the pall bearers being W. A. Barrow, Anderson Brian, J. F. Kennedy, G. L. Stice, Henry Horton and William Walls.
At the funeral of Mrs. Rohrer, held eleven years ago, Rev. Campbell was in charge of the service, using the same text as at Mr. Rohrer's funeral, "Blessed are they that die in the Lord." The singers at Mr.
Rohrer's funeral were the ones who furnished the music at his wife's funeral.
(Dec. 21, 1923)


ROMANG, Christian

Christian Romang Died Wednesday
Civil War Veteran Died After Long Illness at Age of 89 Years.
Christian Romang, well known local citizen and veteran of the Civil War, died about 1:00 o'clock Wednesday morning, June 25, following an illness of several years duration. He was born in Berne canton,
Switzerland, September 12, 1840, being 89 years, 9 months and 13 days of age at the time of his death.
Mr. Romang came to the United States in 1854 and resided in St. Louis, Mo., and Springfield, Ill.
In 1861 he enlisted in Co. G, 21st Illinois infantry (Grant's own regiment). He was with General Grant in his march from Springfield to Riddle Hill on July 3, 1861, and remained with the regiment until mustered out at the end of the war. He was a member of John W. Ross post, G. A. R., of Waverly.
In 1881 Mr. Romang moved to Waverly where he has since resided. During his active life he was a wagon maker and owned a wagon making shop that was known far and wide. He continued to work at his trade until he was compelled to quit on account of age and ill health.
On May 16, 1869, he was united in marriage to Mary Frank, of New Berlin, and to this union seven children were born, three of whom preceded him in death, Catherine Amelia, John Martin and Mary
Catherine (Mrs. Bert Mitchell.) He is survived by his wife; three sons, Godfrey, George and Joseph; and one daughter, Mrs. Anna Malam. He is also survived by 14 grandchildren and 9 great grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at the residence at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon Rev. K. H. Hein, pastor of the Lutheran church of New Berlin officiating. Burial will be in Waverly cemetery.

RUFUS, Christian

Christian Rufus, a well known resident of this city passed away Thursday night at his home on West North street after a brief illness. He was a successful farmer and had many friends who will miss his friendly greeting. He was a member of the G. A. R. and had served his country well in the days of the war.
Mr. Rufus was born in Germany, Jan. 16, 1836 and came to America in the year 1858. At the time of his death he had almost attained to the 78th year of his age. He was for some years a sailor and at one time aided in saving a burning ship and the rescue of quite a number of passengers. At the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in the 2nd regiment N.Y. calvary and served in a creditable manner through the war. At the close of the war he came to Morgan county where he secured a fine farm upon which he made his home until twelve years since when he moved into this city where he has since resided.
Mr. Rufus was in 1872 united in marriage to Miss Augusta Klapkamp who together with the following children survive him: Mrs. John Willerton of Tulsa, Okla; Mrs. Fletcher Coker of Patterson, Ill.; Mrs. A. W. Ruyle of Vandalia, Mo.; Mrs. Albert Newman of Salida, Col.; Mrs. C. C. Sheppard of Oakland, California; C. W. Rufus of South Bend, Ind.; and Henry Rufus of Tulsa, Okla. He was preceded in death by one daughter Mable, and one son Ora. He is survived beside those above mentioned by two half brothers, Ernest and Henry Ginter of Peotone, Ill. Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon at the residence on West North Street and will be charge of Rev. Clyde Darsie.
Friends are requested to omit flowers. Interment will be made in Jacksonville cemetery.
(27 Dec 1913)

RYNDERS, William

William Rynders, son of Andrew and Sarah Rynders was born January 12, 1840 near Little York, Morgan County, Illinois, and departed this life Friday March 24th, 1911. At the age of 12 years he was
converted, uniting with the Mt. Pleasant M. E. church.
At the age of 21 years, he entered the service of his country, in August 1861, from which he carried an honorable discharge at the close of the war.
He was united in marriage Nov. 7th, 1865 with Elizabeth Mulch. To this union were born nine children, two of whom died in infancy and Fredrick A. at the age of 14 years. He follows to the Better Land his beloved wife by only eight weeks and is the last of a large family.
He leaves to mourn his loss six children; viz: James A., and Ruth K. of this city; Albert C. of Wichita, Kansas; Mary E. of St. Louis, Mo.; Oscar B. of Alton; and Wesley N. of Easton.
He was engaged in farming for about eight years, when on account of ill health he removed to this city where he engaged in the lumber, and later in the grain business. He retired from business in 1895.
For several years he was active in church work. He was a remarkable student of the Bible and believed it unwaveringly. The Bible to him was the "Revealed word of God" his daily help and his business guide. How well he loved that book! He acted as a Colporteur for the American Bible Society and distributed Bibles and tracts throughout a wide territory. His Christian faith and ethics were fixed and never for an instant during the long years of his life did he hesitate, falter or change bu died triumphant in the love of Jesus, for he ever expressed himself as ready to go at God's command.
Next to his love for God he held his home and home life in esteem. His entire hopes, ambitions and life were there centered and there he was the ideal husband and father perhaps's a little stern but wisely so;
above all, was hospitable, charitable to all deserving, affectionate and appreciating. (Mar. 31, 1911)

SANDERS, Charles J. - (1826-1916) -
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(Cemetery Reading has "G. J." and has death year 1915, but sure it is the same person)
PROMINENT CONCORD RESIDENT DIES
Charles Sanders Came to Morgan County in Early Days - Acquired Large Land Holdings
At 5:00 p.m. Wednesday, the venerable Charles Sanders died at his home in Concord. He was born Feb. 14, 1826, in Virginia, being nearly ninety one years old at the time of his death. During his early days he had but few advantages and worked hard, receiving for some time but $1 a week. But out of that he saved $45 with which he made his way to this state and when he landed in Springfield had but 25¢ in his pocket. He arrived in this county March 4, 1852, and rented the George Rentschler farm of 100 acres near Concord for five years, and from this humble beginning he went on prospering until he became the owner of 707 acres of choice Morgan county land.
Mr. Sanders was the son of a good man who sacrificed all he had to pay an honest debt contracted by going security, and who was so crushed by it that he died not long afterward. After he was settled in this county Mr. Sanders went back to bring out his grandmother, Mrs. Barbara Burns, who was eighty-nine years old.
It was always a proud boast of his that when he was on his way to Springfield a kind-hearted man gave him a ride in his buggy, and when he asked his name he replied, Abraham Lincoln.
Mr. Sanders was a member of Capt. Brown's company in the 101st Illinois regiment which took such a prominent part in the great conflict and won such fame for Morgan county. In the battle of Peach Tree Creek he was one of a very few of his company who survived. The union forces had only 6,000 men and the Rebels were 45,000 strong.
Mr. Sanders made an impromptu barricade with his knapsack full of clothes and after the fight was over there were fifty three holes found in the article. Once a bullet grazed his forehead, and others went thru his clothes, but he lived to participate in the famous “march to the sea” and the grand review.
Mr. Sanders always took a great deal of interest in everything pertaining to the betterment of the community and was a liberal contributor to the fund for the Concord Methodist church. He was always a very strong temperance advocate and had never lost an opportunity to hit the traffic a blow.
He was married to Miss Hannah Eagle May 21, 1856, by Rev. John H. Lane, a Methodist preacher. His wife died many years ago. He was the father of ten children and those surviving him are Elizabeth, Mrs. Charles Yeck, Martha Ellen, Mrs. Eliza Harmon, Mrs. Meca Yeck, Minnie, Mrs. Charles Meyers, and two sons, James and Ernest, all of whom reside in and near Concord. Those who are dead are Edward Lincoln, Grace, William T. Sherman and Louis. Mr. Sanders was an upright honorable man successful in business, kind hearted to everyone and a strong force in the community in which he lived. He was widely respected by all who knew him and in his death the county loses a useful citizen and a man who served well his generation.
(Jacksonville Journal, November 30, 1916)

SEYMOUR, John Brudd
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

FRANKLIN VETERAN DIES
John Brudd Seymour, of Franklin, the last surviving Civil War veteran of that community, died at Passavant hospital in Jacksonville Tuesday morning, having been a patient there for nearly a week, being removed to the hospital after the destruction by fire of a home where lived in Franklin.
He was 90 years of age, and was born at Hart's Prairie, south of Franklin, August 12, 1846. At the age of 16 he enlisted in the Union army, and fought in numerous historic battles, being with Gen. Sherman on the march to the sea. He was the oldest member of a family that has been prominent in the county for many years. Surviving him are six children.
Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at the Neece Funeral Home in Franklin and burial was in the Franklin cemetery.
Waverly Journal, Friday, June 4, 1937


SEYMOUR, John P. - (1828-1916) -
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JOHN P. SEYMOUR, OF FRANKLIN, DIED AT QUINCY SOLDIERS HOME
Old Morgan County Resident Saw Hard Service in the Civil War - Born in North Carolina.
John P. Seymour of Franklin, one of the earliest pioneer settlers and oldest residents of Morgan county, died Tuesday at the Soldiers' and Sailors' home in Quincy after an illness of two years' duration.
Mr. Seymour was born in Person county, North Carolina, July 17, 1828, the son of William and Elizabeth Seymour.
At the age of seven years he came with his parents to Morgan county, settling seven miles southwest of Franklin, where he remained until removal to Franklin twenty years ago. Mr. Seymour enlisted in Co. H, 101st Illinois Volunteers and saw hard service in the civil war for three years. He pursued the occupation of farming until beset by bad health.
Mr. Seymour was a member of Hartland Baptist church and was a man of uprightness and conviction, universally esteemed as a kind neighbor and true friend. He is survived by a sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Bull of Franklin and a brother, William Seymour of Girard. The children surviving are Mrs. Eva Boyer of Franklin, Mrs. Sadie Dugger and Mrs. Kate Nighbert of Palmyra, Charles O. Seymour and W. E. Seymour of Franklin.
Charles O. Seymour recently went to South Dakota on a business visit. Funeral arrangements have been delayed pending word from him.
(Jacksonville Journal, August 16, 1916)

SHELBURN, Augustus
- (Jacksonville East Cemetery)

CIVIL WAR VETERAN ANSWERS FINAL SUMMONS
Augustus Shelburn Passed Away at Home of Son at Midnight Wednesday - Was Confined in Andersonville Prison. August Shelburn, a veteran of the civil war, passed away at the home of his son, Fred Shelburn, 953 East College avenue at midnight Wednesday. While he has been an invalid for many years Mr. Shelburn had been in his usual health until a few days ago and death came suddenly and unexpectedly.
Deceased was born in Spencer county, Ky., and came to this state when a boy. Since that time he has made his home in Macoupin and Morgan counties. His wife preceded him in death. One son, Fred Shelburn survives.
Mr. Shelburn when the civil war began enlisted in Co. D, 14th Illinois Volunteer Infantry at Camp Butler, which was located at the old fair grounds west of the city.
He served with distinction and was captured by the confederates and placed in Andersonville prison. The vicissitudes thru which he went in that prison so undermined his health that he had been an invalid since.
No arrangements for the funeral have yet been made.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 17 Jan 1918)
SHELBURN.
The funeral of the late August Shelburn was conducted in the undertaking parlors of W. W. Gilham yesterday morning in the presence of the number of friends and members of the Grand Army of the Republic.
The services were in charge of Rev. A. A. Todd, pastor of the First Baptist church of which the deceased was a member.
Music was furnished by Misses Laura Hayden and Etta Massey who sang with fine acceptance, “Nearer My God to Thee” and “Abide With Me.”
Dr. Todd read the 23rd psalm and the 25th and offered a fervent prayer. He then took for his text, “Arise and depart for this is not your rest.” A few thoughts only are presented. These words were uttered to the children of Israel when they were too much inclined to regard a camping place a site of permanent abode. We are not stationary in this life, the world moves, the sea is disturbed with waves and the atmosphere by winds. We like to regard the world as a place of permanent rest but the Maker did not so design it. This world is not an abiding place but we move about in it till death ends our careers. But we have the assurance that there remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God.” “Let not your hearts be troubled; ye believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father's house are many mansions. If it were not so I should have told you; I go to prepare a place for you.”
This comforting message came to our brother for he was a Christian, a member of the Baptist church and a consistent man. It is to our interest to prepare for that rest. He was devoted to his family; his grandchild who mourns him so deeply was the only girl in the family and greatly she will miss him. But he has entered into a glorious rest prepared for them that love God.
The ritual of the Grand Army was then carried out by Commander George Faul and assisting officers and flowers were laid on the casket in proper form, after which the remains were borne to their last resting place in Jacksonville cemetery by Comrades S. T. Madox, L. Goheen, R. R. Stevenson, C. R. Taylor, S. W. Nichols and John Minter.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 20 Jan 1918)


SIBERT, W. E. - (1825-1916)
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FUNERAL SERVICES FOR LATE “UNCLE ERVIN” SIBERT -
Well Known Resident of Meredosia Community Laid to Rest Monday Afternoon
Meredosia, Jan. 11 - Funeral services were held at the Methodist church in Meredosia Monday afternoon, Rev. T. L. Hancock, the pastor, having charge of the services. The singing was in charge of a choir composed of Will G. Looman, Mrs. James McLain, Mrs. William G. Looman, Mrs. O. W. Gould, Mrs. J. H. Looman, Misses Mae Wilson and Margaret McLain, with Miss Nellie Waldo as pianist.
The bearers were his neighbors, Wm. Wenty, George Rausch, Wm. Drivendack, Chance Bushnell, Jas. McLain and C. E. Price. Interment was made in Oakland cemetery at Meredosia.
Those from a distance in attendance at the funeral was his nephew, Edward Long of Virginia, George Mathews and Mrs. Ella Rockwood of Bluffs, Miss Della Hemer of Beardstown, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Parlier of Jacksonville. W. E. Sibert or “Uncle Ervin” as his intimate friends all called him passed away after a two weeks' illness last Saturday evening, January 8, at 9:30 o'clock at his home six miles east of Meredosia.
He was born near Portsmouth, O., Nov. 25, 1825 and made the trip to Illinois in October, 1835, before he was ten years of age, walking most of the way, as the way overland was slow and tedious by ox team.
With him on his trip to Illinois were his parents, his uncles, Gideon and Jeremiah Sibert and their families, about twenty persons in all. They settled near the mouth of the Little Sandy creek west of Winchester. At this place they resided until 1837 or 1838 when the Siberts came to the McKendree chapel neighborhood east of Meredosia. Ervin was forced to go on his own resources at this time, and got employment in a meat packing industry in Meredosia. While here the Northern Cross railroad was built and on the first train ever run west of the Alleghenies on Nov. 8, 1838 Ervin was a passenger.
He followed the pursuit of agriculture until 1857 when he went to Holt county, Mo., and enlisted in the 7th Kansas Cavalry at the out-break of the Civil war. He served out his time of enlistment and went into the cattle business at the close of the war in Holt county, Mo. In 1870 he returned to Illinois and has made his home with his half-sister, Miss Ann Mathews ever since. Until the last ten years when the weight of age forbade, he farmed east of Meredosia.
He was a remarkably well informed man and kept abreast of the times by reading. His favorite paper was the Globe Democrat which he took for the last 45 years. In politics he was a Democrat until the Dread Scott decision. Since that time he has affiliated with the Republican party. He is survived by his half-brother, Isaac N. Mathews and his half-sister, Ann Mathews.
(Jacksonville Journal, January 12, 1916)

SMEDLEY, Thomas Braxton

Former Waverly Merchant Dies
T.B. SMEDLEY PASSES AWAY
Veteran of Civil War and a Resident of Waverly for More than Thirty Years.
Thomas Braxton Smedley was born in Menard County, near Tallula, Ill., July 22, 1832, and died at Bloomington September 6, 1917.
His early life, spent on the farm, was that of the typical pioneer, engaged in subduing the land in this newly settled territory. The neighborhood in which he lived was that which has since become well known as the home of Abraham Lincoln, and in early life, Mr. Smedley at various times came in contact with the future Emancipator.
He was married to Catherine Rice in 1850, her death occurring in 1861. The call to war in the '60s found him ready to respond. He enlisted on March 13, 1862, and became a member of the 14th Illinois
Volunteers, serving until the end of the war. His service was at first with Grant's army in the Mississippi Valley from Shiloh to Vicksburg. Later his regiment was in the southeast. Just before Sherman started on his march to the sea, Mr. Smedley was captured near Marietta, Georgia, and during the remainder of the war he was confined in Southern prisons, most of the time at Andersonville.
He was mustered out at Springfield July 31, 1865, broken in health by his sufferings in prison, from the effects of which he never fully recovered.
On August 1, 1867 he was married to Martha Ann Rice of Waverly, and the home was maintained here for more than thirty years, during most of which time he conducted a successful grocery business.
In 1901 the family moved to Bloomington and for sixteen years the home was made at North Prairie Street. Mrs. Smedley died six years ago, and since that time Mr. Smedley had been quietly awaiting his time
By strength of will he kept up until just at the last. Always unwilling to cause unnecessary trouble, and always a lover of the out doors, he maintained his daily walks in all but the worst of weather, even when he was hardly able to get about. For the last few weeks he had been growing weaker until on Thursday, when he began to fail rapidly. In the latter part of the afternoon of that day he quietly and calmly went to his rest.
His friends in Waverly remember him as a man of generous and kindly nature, a true friend, and a man of honor, whose word required no bond to make it good. He was fond of doing for others in his own
quiet way but was inflexibly opposed to having any display made about what he did. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Waverly, of the Masonic order and of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was prominent in the business affairs of Waverly during his life here.
He is survived by a daughter, Mrs. E. H. Reesor of Springfield; two sons, Frank R. Smedley of Idaho and Ralph C. Smedley, of Monmouth. A little daughter, Bertha, was born September, 1869, and died February 8, 1877. A brother, C. C. Smedley of Eureka Springs, Ark., and a sister, Mrs. Catherine Ferguson of St. Louis also survive him.
Funeral services were held at the late residence in Bloomington Saturday morning, and the remains were brought to Waverly for interment. Short funeral services were held at 4:15 p.m. at East cemetery, in
charge of Rev. S. C. Schaeffer, pastor of the Congregational Church.
(September 14, 1917)


SMITH, Alexander, Capt.

CAPT. SMITH'S CHARRED REMAINS ARE FOUND IN HIS OWN HOME
LONG TIME CITIZEN, FAMOUS IN WAR, BURNED TO DEATH MONDAY MORNING
Fire Discovered at Early Hour By Sister Who was Member of that Household - Exact Details About Death
Will Never Be Known - Coroner's Jury Returns Verdict - Funeral Plans are Not Complete.
A great sorrow came to many people in Jacksonville Monday morning when the news was spread abroad that Capt. Alexander Smith had been burned to death at his West State street home adjoining the Dunlap Hotel. Altho in feeble health for several years, Capt. Smith had during recent months seemed somewhat improved and the news of his very sad death came as a great shock. His charred remains were found in an upstairs room of his residence some time after his sister, Mrs. F. M. Rule, had been awakened by the smoke which poured into her bedroom. The coroner's jury returned a verdict of death by burning and suffocation but the exact facts of the tragedy will never be known as there is no one with knowledge of the details.
The house is two stories and the upper part is divided in two by a hall running north and south thru it. On the west side are two rooms in the north one of which Capt. Smith slept and in the other kept various articles.A door connects the two rooms. On the opposite or east side of the hall Mrs. Rule, Captain Smith's sister, and her little granddaughter, Sarah Lee Rule, ten years old, sleep. As the captain has been for some time in delicate health both he and Mrs. Rule left their doors open that any sound might be heard by either in case of trouble.
Fire Discovered at 4 A.M.
About 4 o'clock yesterday morning Mrs. Rule was awakened by smoke in her room and on arising and investigating she found fire in the house. She hastened to arouse her granddaughter who went down and turned in the alarm and then Mrs. Rule went to the Captain's room, searched as well as she could all about the bed and room but could find no trace of him. The smoke of the fire which seemed to be under the room was so dense she had to get out. When she started downstairs the baseboard of the upper part of the stairway was burning and the ends of several steps were well nigh burned off. The fire came up inside the partition and spread mainly about the west part of the house where the captain was sleeping. She observed it coming out about the door casing and base boards of the rooms but investigating she found no fire near the floor of the lower story and none whatever in the basement kitchen and furnace room.
As soon as the department arrived Mrs. Rule told Chief Hunt she felt the captain was certainly upstairs. Capt. Roach of the night police force and Fireman John Taylor searched all about the room occupied by the captain but could find no trace of him. Then they took a ladder to the south window of the room adjoining, broke their way in and looked all about that room and found nothing. It should be remembered that this searching was done in the midst of dense smoke and as thoroughly as possible.
Some one reported that the captain was over at the hotel which seemed to be the case and the energies of the men were bent toward putting out the fire. The chemical was found to be inadequate and the engine steam was turned on and the flames were soon subdued. The house was not greatly damaged by the fire but the contents were pretty thoroughly ruined by water.
Charred Body Found
After the fire had been put under control Chief Hunt told James Hurst to search the rooms for valuables and put them in safe keeping. The man went upstairs and soon came running down stating that the body of Captain Smith had been found. It seems the unfortunate man was roused by the fire which must have been evident to him sometime before it was disclosed to his sister. He must have been confused and instead of getting out he groped his way into the room south of his own and by some means stumbled and staggered into the corner where he was found behind a door. He was found with his head against the wall and right over the worst part of the fire which had burned through the floor, burned a part of his body and rendered him almost unrecognizable.
Chief Hunt at once took a tarpaulin from the hook and ladder wagon and wrapped the body in it and had it removed to the undertaking parlors of John Reynolds. Coroner Rose summoned a jury consisting of Dr. W. W. Crane, foreman; C. E. McDougall, J. R. Kirkman, John E. Wright, A. P. Vasconcellos and John Minter, clerk, S. W. Nichols was also assisting in taking down the testimony. All were veterans of the war but Mr. Crane.
The evidence of Fireman Hurst, Mrs. Rule and Chief Samuel Hunt was heard and the verdict was that death was caused by suffocation and burning.
Inquest Begins.
It is understood that the loss of the house is covered by insurance. The house formerly stood on Jordan street and was built by Hon. Thomas Springer for his daughter, Mrs. Kinman, but was sold later and removed to the place it now occupies. It is well built and in good condition. Naturally the first question is how did the fire originate?
In the testimony given Chief Hunt, the fireman and Mrs. Rule felt sure it was caused by the electric wires as the fire was almost wholly inside the partition under the stairs at the start and no fire at all was visible in any other part of the house. Mrs. Rule said they had no matches about the place. The kitchen was untouched by fire and the heating plant had not yet been fired and there was at the start no fire below the button in the hall which turns on the electricity in the house. About this Chief Hunt testified, a large hole more than a foot in diameter was burned.
On the other hand, S. E. Anderson, inspector for the Jacksonville Railway and Light Company and G. A. Sieber, electrical contractor are certain the fire did not originate there and in proof of it say they had the wires about the button examined and found them intact which could not be if the fire started there.
Relatives Notified
When Mrs. Smith died, two and half years ago, the Captain's sister, Mrs. Rule, and her husband, Rev. F. M. Rule, came to live with and take care of the captain. Dr. Rule has been absent for some time in Minnesota aiding in financial work for a college and later at Tracy caring for his son who was at the point of death with pneumonia, but who is improving. He was wired and answered that he would be here today. The adopted son, Alex Smith, Jr., residing in St. Louis, arrived last evening. Mrs. Rule bore the terrible ordeal as well as could be expected though she was dreadfully prostrated and the grief of Major Vickery, who had for almost half a century been associated with Capt. Smith, is pathetic.
Major E. S. Johnson, a member of Captain Smith's regiment, also came down from Springfield yesterday to tender his sympathy and services as far as they might be of use.
Born in Ohio
Captain Smith was born in Eaton, Ohio, June 27, 1844, and was the son of Alexander and Elizabeth Ritchie Smith. The father was born in Virginia and the mother in Vermont. The father died in Iowa in 1857. When yet a boy Captain Smith began to learn the saddler's trade at Atlanta, Ill., but at the beginning of the war he at once heard the call of his country and April 1, 1861, enlisted, when but sixteen years of age. He laid the claim to being the first man in the state to enlist and the first one to reach Camp Butler to be mustered in. He enlisted in Co. E, 7th Ill. Volunteers, and April 29th was promoted to the rank of corporal. At the expiration of his three months service in the 7th, he re-enlisted and July 25, 1861 was promoted to the office of first lieutenant, and Nov. 12, 1862 was made captain at Corinth, Miss., when but eighteen years and three months old.
Great War Record
On the wall in his room is a frame containing the record of his various positions and it was ever much prized by him. He served till mustered out at Louisville, Ky., July 9, 1865, and was finally discharged at Springfield July 13, 1865. He participated in fifteen sanguinary battles, was in the famous march to the sea, Carolina campaign, surrender of Johnston's army, and the famous review at Washington. He never wearied of telling about the battle at Altoona pass which was bloody. In this engagement there were 1200 Union men against 6000 Confederates. Captain Smith took into that battle a company of 51 men and lost 41. They were armed with Henry rifles and did tremendous execution, and it is said that but for this very equipment the battle result might have been different. The regimental flag was shot through 217 times but not surrendered. Although he was engaged in so many battles he was not at any time captured by the enemy, and was not wounded or sick. At the close of the war he moved to Mattoon where he was clerk of the Essex House from 1866 to '69, when he came to Jacksonville and entered the employ of the Kelseys, then managers of the Dunlap, Park and Wabash station hotels. Later, when the Kelseys went away he was employed by Charles and Walter Dunlap, managers of the Dunlap House and shortly after that he took charge of the Park House as manager and built up a large business there.
Bought Hotel Property
Finally he gained control of the Dunlap House and later on bought that and the Park Hotel property and owned other real estate also. In January, 1904, he felt he had done enough in the way of hotel keeping and leased his property to others and has since been on the retired list.
April 7, 1876 Captain Smith was married to Miss Josephine Marie Litzelman of Terre Haute, Indiana, and she was the daughter of Mathis Litzelman of Alsatian descent. They took to their hearth and home an adopted son, a nephew of Mrs. Smith and named him Alexander Jr., and he was ever as their own flesh and blood. He is now located in St. Louis and arrived in the city last evening. Mrs. Smith died two and half years ago. Captain Smith also leaves a sister, Mrs. F. M. Rule, of this city. Captain Smith was a member of State Street church and as far as able attended its services. He was also a charter member of the Society of the Army of the Tennessee, Matt Star Post No. 378, Grand Army of the Republic, the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, the Order of Elks, and a charter member of Jacksonville, Lodge No. 152, Knights of Pythias, and only recently he visited the lodge and made an address.
A Loss to the Community
Captain Smith was a genial, whole-souled gentleman, kind hearted and liberal and did much good in a quiet manner. He was popular far and wide and no landlord ever was more esteemed by his many guests. For some time he has been in failing health, yet he bade fair to remain a long time with his loved ones. The evening before his tragic end he had a pleasant conversation with Major Vickery and later with the brother of his adopted son with whom he conversed a long time. As he returned to his house Mrs. Rule helped him up the steps and then went down to lock the front door, little thinking it would be opened under such circumstances. Truly a good and popular man has gone and his loss will be deeply felt.
Arrangements for the funeral have not been made. (Jacksonville Daily Journal, Tuesday morning, January 16, 1917)
FINAL HONORS PAID TO CAPT. SMITH THURSDAY
Great Audience Present at the Funeral Services
Deceased Lauded By Ministers for Public Spirit and Personal Characteristics - Nation Owes Great Debt to Capt. Smith and Others Like Him.
Hundreds of friends gathered in State Street Presbyterian church Thursday afternoon to pay tribute to the memory of Capt. Alexander Smith. These friends represented every walk in life for Capt. Smith's friendship and charity were far reaching. There were men with whom Capt. Smith had been associated in business thru many years. There were those whom he had befriended and there were the grey haired veterans who had known and fought with him during the war of the rebellion to preserve the Union.
It was truly a representative gathering and showed in a small measure the wide scope of Capt. Smith's life and influence in the community. The members of Matt Star Post G. A. R., Jacksonville Lodge No. 152, Knights of Pythias of which Capt. Smith was a charter member, Jacksonville Lodge No. 682 B. P. O. E. and the T. P. A. and U. C. T. attended the funeral in a body.
The Knights of Pythias carried a silk flag which had been presented to Capt. Smith by war comrades to replace the regimental flag that had been riddled with bullets during the war. On it is inscribed a list of the battles in which the regiment took part. The only time it has been out of possession of the lodge was when Capt. Smith asked for it on the occasion of the anniversary of one of the battles in which he took part, and it was taken to his home for that day.
Many Veterans Present
Perhaps the most impressive feature of the service was the large attendance of members of the G. A. R. It showed in a large measure the opinion of these grey haired men who had known Capt. Smith in the early days and who had shared with him the perils of battle. So these men who had looked thru the smoke of battle with eyes unafraid in the morning of life, marched with measured tread beside the remains of all that was mortal of their comrade, and tho the eyes were dim they still looked unafraid into the sunset of life where they will soon rest until the final bugle call.
The services opened with a duet “Beautiful Isle of Somewhere,” by Mrs. William Barr Brown and Mrs. Percy Jenkinson. At the close of the services they sang, “Sometime We'll Understand.”
Appropriate passages of scripture were read by the Rev. R. B. Wilson, pastor of State Street Presbyterian church. Rev. Frederic B. Madden; pastor of Grace church then offered a fervent prayer. This was followed by Dr. Joseph R. Harker, president of Illinois Woman's college, who paid a beautiful tribute to Capt. Smith as a citizen. Dr. Harker said:
It is doubtful if the heart of Jacksonville was ever more deeply stirred than in the sad death of Capt. Alexander Smith, a Christian brother, a devoted friend, one of our most honored citizens, a patriot and a soldier of nation wide exalted recognition and reputation. His work was done, his record was made, he had fought a good fight, he had finished his course, he already had heard the “well done, good and faithful servant” of his country and his friends. But we were still hoping for some years more of his genial and friendly presence, and of his personal inspiration and fellow-ship.
A Rich Inheritance
Dr. Morey will speak more fully of his life and character and especially of his service to the nation as a soldier and patriot, and so I will not speak of his eminent services in these relations. It is very difficult for us to day to realize our debt to the men and women of fifty years and more ago, who by service and sacrifice met the needs of the nation and of the pioneer days of this community. Jacksonville is especially rich in such men and women, of large vision, unusual energy, and willingness to sacrifice themselves for those who should come after them. Our city is rich in material relating to the making of history, not only of the city itself, but of the state and the nation. It is doubtful if any other city of its size in the Middle West has produced as many men and women of as great ability and character. We are in danger of forgetting the rich inheritance we have as a community and of forgetting these men and women, and what they have done. The present and coming generations should know more about these things, and should be brought to a fuller appreciation of the spirit and character and sacrifice of our earlier citizens, so that they in turn might catch that spirit, and endeavor to emulate their far sightedness and service, and to prove themselves worthy as their successors. There should be more memorials of these men and women in our institutions and public buildings and parks, and a larger recognition of their names in some general or public way, otherwise we are going to forget in a few years, that they ever lived and labored here.
The work that Mr. Ensley Moore is doing in this direction is worthy of the most generous recognition and praise, and the revival of the Historical Society is a step in the right direction. With the nearness of the centennial of the State, and with the coming in a few years, of the hundredth anniversary of the founding of Jacksonville, it is to be hoped that there will be a great revival of interest in these matters.
I have the honor to express briefly what I think we would all like to say much more fully of the Captain as one of our most honored citizens and as a genial warmhearted friend and Christian gentleman.
An Enthusiastic Friend.
No man among us, it seems to me, was ever more considerate and genial and gentlemanly. The memory will linger long of the hearty swing of his arm, and the friendly grasp of his hand as he met us, and his genuine interest in us and our families and our work. And with the heartiness there was always a gentleness and an enthusiasm which made it worth while to meet him. I have often said that it made the day brighter and the tasks of life lighter to meet the Captain in the morning. He had his inner circle of friends, as every one has, and of the depth of his affection and the helpfulness of his friendship to these little can be said here.
But it is a happy legacy he leaves in their hearts, and a memory book of many delightful pages which will give them joy and strength for the rest of their lives But the captain's capacity for friendship was very wide. Although he never I think held a public office in the community, he was probably for a number of years, one of our best known citizens. His relation to the Dunlap Hotel gave him an unusua opportunity to meet people. And he had a rare quality of meeting you in such a way as to make you feel from the start that he was a sincere and genuine friend.
His interest was especially marked in the young men of the community and in the traveling men. He followed the boys of Jacksonville after they had left and gone into other states, and it was a matter of surprise that even in the last two or three years, with impaired health, he would recall so many of our boys and young men, and make constant inquiry about them, always interested in how they are making good.
Interested in Traveling Men
It was natural that he should be interested in traveling men, but his regard and friendship for them was altogether beyond the fact of his business relations with them. As a class the traveling men of Jacksonville are among its best citizens, both in character and business ability. They are a great asset to the city, not always fully and rightly appreciated. But Captain Smith knew them intimately and valued them highly, and showed his appreciation of them in every possible way. And I am sure I speak for every one of them when I say that his memory will be lovingly cherished by them, and they will often recall his interesting and helpful comradeship.
Our beloved Captain Smith is no longer in our midst. But we are all better men and women, because he has been with us, and our hearts are stronger and our lives more helpful and sunshiny because we have had him here so long to smile on us and to inspire us. I think the poem that appeared in the Journal of yesterday, by
Mrs. S. A. Hughes, a very beautiful expression of appreciation, and I cannot refrain from using here the first and fifth stanzas.
“Taps are sounded. Lights are out
Undisturbed by battle shout.
Lies the Captain, while o'er him
Float the stars that never dim;
Stars he loved unto the end,
As when young he helped defend.
Drop not on the Captain's bier,
Unavailing, briny tear,
For remember all the while
Gave he you a pleasant smile;
And we trust there is no night,
That he smiles beyond our sight.”
Dr. A. B. Morey for many years pastor of Capt. Smith and a life long friend then delivered the sermon. He spoke as follows:
“We bury today a soldier, who, though he died at home, died as truly for his country as if he had died on the battlefield. His whole life was a battle. He had a battle with himself when he was a boy, and a greater battle as a young man, when he entered the army. He had to struggle with such questions as these: “What has the war to do with me? What does it mean to my country?” It was the war that stood out as the great overshadowing event of his life. It gives the keynote of our thought at this hour.
The War Had to Come
The people of today cannot imagine how our brother and his comrades felt fifty-seven years ago. And I am heartily glad you cannot. But as, year by year we bury these men, who looked down into the deep questions of that day, they become a glass in which we can see meanings in that struggle, which the greatest statesmen did not see when the war began; and it is not now so well understood as it will be hereafter. But this much is plain: As Capt. Smith so often said, “the war had to come.” The necessity for it was written in the whole history of the republic and the colonies. It is written in the history of England for centuries and in the shape and climate and soil and products of the different parts of our continent. It was written on the flag of the first ship that brought African slaves to the English colonies of North America. “The war had to come sometime.” The eloquence of some of our statesmen delayed it for a time, the madness of others hastened it, but with human nature as it is “the war had to come sooner or later.” Slavery had grown to such tremendous proportions that it had fallen under the ban of the civilized world and somehow at some time it must cease to be. It was worth all our dreadful losses, all the sufferings of the long, frightful conflict and the blood of our precious dead to wipe out that blot on our fair land and fling it behind us forever.
“What the war cost the nation is fading out of the memory. Where a soldier lies there is a historian lost. The history of the war is not in books. It is oral history told in idle hours from man to man by those who can say ' part of this I was, all of this I saw.' This kind of historian of the war will soon cease to be. Therefore, we ought to make a good deal of the old soldier while he lasts. He helps to keep alive the reality of the old days.
Let us catch today .
At the end of the war he came back and quietly took his place as a useful citizen, doing his duty, cultivating an interest in his fellow men, generous always and everywhere with an open hand for the needy, contributing to the support of the church and improvement of the city. To him we owe the order of the Knights of Pythias in our midst. He was the truest of friends. But it was a battle all the way. He had a long hard fight in himself and for himself and by himself. But in each he at last conquered. The perfect character has come to him now.
He will have to fight no more. But he will never forget the battle. Why should he? His enemies are subdued and they will hang on the halls of his memory like the shields of the vanquished ones.
“In the greatest poem that was written in memory of the dead, Tennyson describes the mental struggle of our troubled age. Those two wonderfully gifted young men went to the making of the great poem, one who died to be its subject, the other who lived to compose it. He who died must have been a man of extraordinary powers and promise to make such a profound impression and to turn all the poet's deepest thoughts and feelings for so long a time into pathetic memories of him. Cannot we draw inspiration from this brave soul who has been snatched from us and resolve afresh to live worthy of him?
The Present's Debt to the Past
“My generation in America is a remnant. The great proportion of the men who were boys with me are gone to their reward. Such of us as are left must be ____ at the longest, from now to the excused if we remember that it is not roll call after the battle. Very soon we shall see those who here laid down their lives that this might be a better world to live in. As we stand today at the edge of the graves of those who died for us we must beware of one thing, the tendency of excusing ourselves from righting the wrongs of our city and nation. There is a long, crowded, seething future before us in this land. Having twice been washed in blood, against the expectation of the wisest, is it fit for us, now that we are at peace and now that the subtle sorcery of luxury has come to us once more, out of the death of our martyrs, to forget them and to forget God and make unfashionable the Lord's example of purging the temple? On the side of Eternal Power, not ourselves, which makes for righteousness, our country was not a unit, and therefore she fell for awhile beneath those high flaming chariot wheels of justice. There is a prospect that our nation may not be a unit of times to come, in loving as that Almighty Power loves and in hating what He hates, and therefore there is a call to remember our past and sow in the fat, ploughed fields of our bitter days and on all the great and yet smoking furrows of our wars, abundant seed of consistence that will take root and bring forth fruit in politics, in trade, in homes and in everyone's secret sense of what is pure and true and good.
“To fight against corruption as our soldiers fought against conspiracy; to stand for the whole land in peace as they stood in war, and in war if it comes again, to make the uttermost sacrifice which he demanded of our country - there, are just as truly the demands made on us as were the demands on the brave self-sacrificing soldier. And his death tells us that when we have faithfully done our best for our nation and for our city and for ourselves - in our hushed homes or in noisy cities or in burning houses each of us in his turn shall hear the sunset gun.”
G. A. R. Service
The Rev. R. B. Wilson then offered the closing prayer. The service of the G. A. R. was then carried out in the church except the final commitment which was given at the grave. This service was in charge of George Faul, commander, and Major C. E. McDougall, chaplain, assisted by Capt. John E. Wright, Capt. John A. Schaub and Lycurgus Goheen.
There were many beautiful floral offerings and these were cared for by Mrs. John R. Robertson, Mrs. H. B. Brady, and Miss Katherine Barr.
The casket was covered with a silk flag from Matt Star Post and a spray of lilies. Among other offerings were a Set piece emblem from Jacksonville Lodge No. 152, Knights of Pythias; Sprays from Jacksonville Lodge No. 682 B. P. O. E.; the T. P. A. and U. C. T., Dunlap and Pacific hotels; Mrs. John R. Robertson; Mr. and Mrs. Charles K. Moore; Mrs. H. B. Brady, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Russel and a beautiful set piece from the family.
Burial was in Diamond Grove cemetery. The active bearers were S. O. Barr, H. J. Rodgers, Walter Ayers, W. L. Fay, Miller Weir, and H. B. Brady. The honorary bearers were Dr. Carl E. Black, Ensley Moore, Dr. T. J. Pitner, Judge E. P. Kirby, J. H. Hackett, Dr. J. W. Hairgrove, Gates Strawn, C. H. Russell, S. T. Anderson, Frank Elliott, John A. Ayers, Andrew Russel and Major E. S. Johnson and Capt. J. B. Inman of Springfield.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Friday Morning, January 19, 1917)

SMITH, William P.

William P. Smith, son of Thomas S. and Cynthia Smith was born near White Hall, March 24, 1836, and died Thursday, November 13th, 1913 at 6:50 a.m. at his home near Lowder. He was united in marriage to Miss Mary George November 3, 1859. She died in March 1861.
Mr. Smith joined the Army of the Rebellion in August 1861, and served three years. His second marriage was to Lucy Jane Doyle January 31, 1866. He was converted in February 1866, and united with
the M. E. church in Virden, afterwards moving his membership to Lowder where he lived a consisted member the remaining days of his life.
To the first union was born one child, who died in infancy. To the second union two daughters were born: Mary Henrietta, wife of C. O. Swift, who died February 9, 1895; and Nora B. who lives at home with her mother. Beside his wife and daughter, Mr. Smith is survived by two grandchildren, Mrs. P. O. Watts and Mrs. Howard Palmer, both of Lowder, and two great grandchildren. Also one brother N. F. Smith of Manchester, and a sister Mrs. John Beatty of Waverly, together with a host of other relatives and friends.
During his last illness he frequently spoke of this life as being spent in a house built with hands and expressed a desire to go to "that house not built with hands, eternal in the heavens."
The funeral service was held Monday morning at 11 o'clock in the M.E. church at Lowder, Rev. E. V. Young of Williamsville officiating. Interment was made in the East cemetery in this city.
(Nov. 21, 1913)


SNYDER, Adam W.

Adam W. Snyder died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Eva Liter, 303 East Walnut street Thursday morning at 5:20 o'clock.
Deceased was born in Saratoga, N. Y., May 27, 1840. He spent his early life in that city and in 1863 he enlisted in Company C, First New York Veteran Cavalry. He served until the close of the war being mustered out in 1865.
He came to this state over 40 years ago and has always made his home in this vicinity. H was united in marriage in 1883 to Rebecca Vier. She preceded him in death in 1898. He is survived by two sons, John B. Snyder of this city and Lewis P. Snyder who is in service at Camp Logan, Texas, and three daughters, Mrs. I. E. Liter, Mrs. Claude Dotson of this city and Mrs. Cleve Long of Springfield.
Mr. Snyder was a farmer by occupation and followed his calling until a number of years ago when he retired from active work. For the past two years he has made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Eva Liter, who has given him every care and attention a loving daughter could bestow.
Brief services will be said at the Liter home Saturday afternoon at 1:45 o'clock and the remains will then be taken to Little Indian where services will be said at Zion church with burial in the nearby cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, dtd. 22 Feb 1918)

SNYDER, George W. - (1842-1916) -
Click for CEMETERY READING

GEORGE SNYDER DIES AT HOME IN ALEXANDER WEDNESDAY
Old Resident of Morgan County and Veteran of Civil War Passes Away After Long Illness - Was Wounded in service.
George W. Snyder, Sr. died Wednesday evening at his home in Alexander, thus ending a life of long usefulness and upright Christian character. Mr. Snyder had been in failing health for several years but his illness became acute but a short time since. Deceased was born in Harrisburg, Pa., March 30, 1842, and was hence in his seventy-fourth year.
Mr. Snyder enlisted in Co. G., Union Guards, 10th Ill. Infantry, original three months service men. The officers of the company were McLean F. Wood, captain; James Mitchell, first lieutenant; James F. Longley, second lieutenant;
Theodore F. Dockson, first sergeant; Joseph C. Mitchell, John McAhan and John S. Patterson, sergeants; Wm. E. Hunt, Edward R. Egbert, Wm. S. Sperry and John M. Stringham, corporals. Charles B. Happy and Tm. T. Gibbons, musician.
The company was principally raised in Jacksonville and the list contains many familiar names: Thos. C. Barber, Wesley Platt, Philip Cruse, Preston Trotter, James Walker, Charles French, John W. Sargent and many others. At the end of this term of service he again enlisted in the 7th Infantry and served with zeal and fidelity till almost the close of the war. His death was the result of a wound received from a rebel sharpshooter while in the service. Mr. Snyder left Pennsylvania when about sixteen years of age. He enlisted in April, 1861 and was mustered out in July 1865. He returned to Jacksonville at the close of the conflict and was married to Miss Lydia N. Souper in 1872.
Mr. and Mrs. Snyder removed to Nortonville and after a number of years there went to live on a farm south of Alexander. They have occupied their present residence in the village about eight years. Surviving Mr. Snyder are three sons and three daughters: James A. Snyder resides in East St. Louis, George W. Snyder, Jr., in Franklin and John S. Snyder in Alexander. Miss Elizabeth Snyder and Mabel, wife of Jesse Lawson, make their home in Alexander and Miss Annie May Snyder lives in Jacksonville. There is one granddaughter, Mabel Snyder, daughter of J. A. Snyder.
Mr. Snyder belonged to Matt Starr post, G. A. R., and was known as one of its faithful members. He had membership in Alexander Methodist church and in all his dealings he was fair and straightforward.
Arrangements for the funeral will be made at a later time.
(Jacksonville Journal, February 17, 1916)

SPENCER, Benjamin F.

BENJ. F. SPENCER RITES TOMORROW AT MURRAYVILLE
Aged Resident of County Was Widely Known - Served in Civil War for Union.
Benjamin Franklin Spencer, a member of a pioneer family and a long time resident of Morgan county, passed away at his home five miles south of Murrayville Saturday afternoon, after an extended illness. For the past three years mr. Spencer has been in failing health and his condition had been serious since last September.
Mr. Spencer was born February 21, 1842 on the old Spencer homestead south of Murrayville. It was on this farm that the decedent's parents, William S. and Parthenia Totton Spencer, settled when they came west from Kentucky, and with the exception of a few years spent in Roodhouse Mr. Spencer has always resided there.
As a youth Mr. Spencer enlisted for service in the Union army during the Civil War. He was a member of Company I, 101st Regiment of Illinois Volunteers under command of Captain Lightfoot.
In the year of 1864, he was married to Miss Mary C. Payton who preceded him in death several years ago.
Surviving are the following children: Mrs. Katherine Wagstaff, Jacksonville; Mrs. Thankful Wagstaff, Murrayville; Mrs. Parthenia Chapman, Alton; Mrs. Nellie Chapman, Roodhouse; Fred Iasiah and Charles Spencer all of Texas; and Dr. J. H. Spencer of this city. The decedent leaves one sister, Mrs. Jane Neighbors, of this city, the only living member of a large family.
Mr. Spencer spent many years as a farmer and stock raiser at his farm south of Murrayville, where he was considered one of the most successful men of his community. He was a member of the Methodist church for fifty years and was active in the work until ill health interfered.
Funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Murrayville Methodist church in charge of Rev. Paul Dubois, with interment in the Murrayville cemetery. The Murrayville post of the American Legion will assist at the services.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 28 Mar 1927)


SPENCER, James
Click for Cemetery Reading

James Spencer, formerly for many years a resident of this county, died at his home five miles east of Roodhouse, Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock, as the result of injuries received Tuesday evening between 5 and 6 o'clock, by being kicked in the stomach by a mule. The injured man was attended to by Dr. Smith of Roodhouse, who called Dr. Carl F. Black of this city to the case, but their efforts to save the injured man were unsuccessful.
Mr. Spencer was born and reared in the vicinity of Murrayville and spent his whole life there until about five years ago when he removed to Greene county. He was a veteran of the civil war, having served his country faithfully as a member of the famous 101st Illinois. He was about 66 years of age at the time of his death.
Deceased is survived by his wife and two sons, Robert and Arthur, and two daughters, Mattie Spencer and Mrs. Christina Merhall. He also leaves five brothers: John, living west of this city; Frank, of Murrayville; Wilson, of Kansas; George, of Missouri and Joseph Spencer of Bath; and one sister, Mrs. Jane Neighbors of Murrayville.
Funeral services will be held at the Bethel church this morning at 11 o'clock and interment will be in the Gunn cemetery, five miles south of Murrayville.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Jacksonville, Illinois, April 6, 1905)

SPENCER, William -
(Jacksonville East Cemetery)

WILLIAM SPENCER MET INSTANT DEATH
While the coroner's jury enquiring into the death of William Spencer, who was killed by a street car on the South Main street line Sunday, returned a verdict exonerating Motorman Linderman and saying that death was accidental, it recommended that steps be taken to make cars, both north and south, come to a full stop at the Anna street intersection with South Main street.
William Spencer, Sr., a well known resident of the city was struck and instantly killed by a south bound car just south of Anna street at 12:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon. The car was in charge of Motorman Linderman.
The remains were taken to the undertaking parlors of W. W. Gilham and Coroner Rose empaneled a jury and set the hour of the inquest for 7:30 o'clock Monday evening. However, there were so many witnesses and others interested in the case that adjournment was taken to the circuit court room.
The testimony of a large number of witnesses was heard. Attorney W. N. Hairgrove was present representing the Spencer family. State's Attorney Robinson was present representing the state and Bellatti, Bellatti and Moriarty as attorneys for the railway company.
Court Reporter __. W. English took the testimony for Coroner Rose and Mrs. Glenn Skinner the testimony for the railway company. The taking of testimony was not finished until nearly 11 o'clock. After that the jury deliberated until midnight before a verdict was reached.
The full text of the verdict follows:
TEXT OF VERDICT
In the matter of the inquisition on the body of William S. Spencer deceased, held at Jacksonville, Ill., on the 6th day of May A.D., 1918, we, the undersigned, jurors, sworn to inquire of the death of William S. Spencer, on oath do find that he came to his death by being accidentally struck by street car No. 34 of the Jacksonville Railway & Light Co., which left the public square in Jacksonville, Ill., southbound near the Anna Street crossing on S. Main St., Jacksonville, Ill.
At 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, May 5, 1918, and being thereby thrown upon a pile of paving brick at the side of the car track of said street railway. We find that the motorman in charge of the said car was in no wise to be blamed for the accident.
We find that the leaving of the piles of paving brick in their present location has constituted and does constitute a menace to public safety and we recommend that the proper authorities take immediate action to have same removed without further delay, also; We find that the running of the cars of the above mentioned street railway company at their usual rate of speed past the Anna street crossing is dangerous and recommend that the said company shall cause all of its cars both northbound and southbound to come to a full stop at the near side of said crossing. E.F. Johnston, Foreman, Clyde C. Hembrough, Charles Blesse, John H. Zell, C.J. Rataichak, Allen Stewart, Clerk.
THE MOTORMAN'S STORY
The testimony of Otto Linderman, the motorman in charge of the car, was perhaps the most definite. Mr. Linderman testified that he had applied the power to the car at College street and had shut it off before reaching Anna street. This was explained by Mr. Linderman as being customary as all cars are allowed to coast down the grade to Anna
street of their own momentum. Just before reaching Anna street he saw Mr. Spencer come out of Anna street and turn south. He was walking about the middle of the pavement between the west side of the car track and the curbing. Motorman Linderman said that he used his brake partially and sounded the gong. Mr. Spencer, according to the witness turned and looked at the car. He then continued on south to the west side of the track. Mr. Linderman said thinking that Mr. Spencer had heard the gong and was out of danger applied the power again. Just as the car got within about fifteen feet of Mr. Spencer he apparently decided to get across the track to the east side of the street.
Evidently Mr. Spencer misjudged the speed at which the car was going as he was struck just as he got to the east of the center of the track. Linderman said he applied the brakes but was unable to stop the car in time to prevent it from striking Mr. Spencer. The car ran, according to Linderman about 20 feet after it struck him.
Mr. Spencer's leg and arm were broken and there was a large scalp wound on the top of his head. It is probable that there were also internal injuries. Dr. Walrich was driving home and was near the scene and was one of the first to reach Mr. Spencer. He made an examination and stated that death was instantaneous. Any of the several visible injuries probably would have caused death and there must have been internal injuries.
MR. SPENCER LONG TIME RESIDENT
William Spencer was a native of England having been born in Woodhouse May 17, 1840. He came to this country early in life and had been a resident of this city since 1861.
He was united in marriage in this city November 21, 1865 to Miss Elizabeth Humphrey. To this union ten children were born, two of whom with the widow survive, William Spencer, Jr., and Miss Lennie B. Spencer both of this city.
Mr. Spencer enlisted in Co. A, 10th Illinois Infantry in 1861 and served to the close of the war. He was in all of the important battles in the campaign from Atlanta to the sea and on thru the Carolinas and took part in the grand review in Washington. He was a consistent member of Centenary church and was a citizen whose long record of useful service made him a credit to the community.
Funeral services will be held from the residence 1323 South East street Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of the Rev. W. R. Leslie. The members of Matt Starr Post G. A. R. will attend the funeral in a body and will have charge of the services at the grave. Burial will be in Jacksonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 7 May 1918)

SPERRY, Edward

Edward Sperry was born in the state of Massachusetts (the place is not recorded) December 4, 1825, and died in Waverly, Ill., September 1, 1908, aged 82 years, 8 months and 3 days. When a mere child of two years his parents moved to Avon, Conn. Here he grew to manhood. He came to Illinois and settled in Waverly, taking a homestead a few miles southwest of town.
He was married to Miss Catharine Hilligass in Jacksonville, Ill., September 10, 1848. Of this union were born two children, a boy and a girl, both of whom died in infancy, leaving the parents to grow into old age childless. After the marriage they came to Waverly and established their home. By a strange and interesting coincidence they lived a little while in a frame house situated where the cemetery now is. Little did they think their first home would be their last earthly resting place. He was the last one of a family of seven, all of the others preceded him to the silent land.
He was a volunteer in the union army and loyally and bravely fought for the flag of the union. He served for three years and two months. He was home once in all that time on a furlough of a few weeks.
He belonged to Co. "I" 14th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, 17th army corps. He kept a diary of much of the time he was in the service, which makes quite interesting reading this late day. He was one of the old guard which are passing away so swiftly. He was a member of the "Grand Army of the Republic." He was a man who said little about religious affairs. He believed in christianity. He told the writer that under Peter Akers, during a great revival in Jacksonville, he was converted. He was a man of splendid high ideal of integrity.
He has gone to his reward and leaves in his death his aged wife with whom he has traveled in life's journey for nearly 60 years. Also a large number of relatives in the second generation.
These old comrades will miss his benign face, and his place at the meetings of the post will be vacant. He lived a brave man. He died bravely, yielding at last to the shaft of death.
The funeral was held at the family residence. It was attended by a large circle of sympathizing friends. The G. A. R. attended in a body. Rev. J. O. Kirkpatrick conducted the funeral services. The
remains were interred in the East Cemetery. (Sept. 4, 1908)


SPERRY, James M.

James M. Sperry was born in Hartford county, Connecticut, September 8, 1833, and died at his home in Waverly, Ill., February 21, 1904. Deceased came to Illinois in 1840 with his parents, who settled a year later on a farm nine miles southwest of Waverly. On December 22, 1861, he was united in marriage to Miss Phoebe C. Wood. To this union was born ten children, seven sons and three daughters. One daughter and two sons preceded him to the grave. In the fall of 1864 he enlisted as a recruit in Co. G, 101st Illinois Infantry, and followed that regiment's fortunes during the remainder of its service. He expressed himself on several occasions as being ready to go. He was a kind but firm father, always enforcing obedience to his commands. Although he was a great sufferer for many years, he was always patient and uncomplaining.
Funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, at the M. E. Church, South, conducted by Rev. R. J. Watts, assisted by Rev. Chas. Fry, followed by interment in East cemetery. The pall-bearers (members of the G. A. R.) were W. T. Osborn, Patrick Maher, Wm. Carr, John Maginn, J. H. Goldsmith and George
Murray.

SPERRY, Luther C.

Luther C. Sperry was born November 28, 1839 at Hartford, Conn. He died at Waverly, Ill., March 4, 1912 at the age of 72 years, 3 months, and 9 days. Mr. Sperry was the youngest child of Alford and Sarah Sperry, and was the last of a family of six children. The deceased came to Illinois with his father's family, from their old home in Litchfield county, Connecticut when he was only one year old. He served for three years in the army during the civil war, enlisting in Champaign county, in the 25th Illinois Infantry. When mustered out of service at the end of three years he was yet only 21 years of age.
Mr. Sperry was never married and spent his declining years among his relatives. The greater part of the last two years have been spent with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Merit, of Waverly, the deceased being an uncle of Mrs. Merit. He died in their home Monday morning, about 8:30 o'clock.



SPIRES, James Burton

Civil War Veteran Called By Death
James Burton Spires, son of James and Lucia Skidmore Spires, was born at Highland, Lincoln Co., Ky., February 27, 1847, and died at his home in Waverly, Monday, January 23, 1928, being 80 years, 10 months and 25 days of age.
He came to Illinois with his father's family sixty years ago, driving the distance in a covered wagon, and locating in Morgan County west of Franklin.
On October 1, 1874, he was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Knoles. They made their first home on a farm in Sangamon county, where they lived fifteen years, moving from there to a farm near
Waverly, and then into town, where he spent the last years of his life.
He is survived by his wife; one sister, Mrs. Salle A. Taylor, of Pana, Illinois; and one brother, Shelby S. Spires, location unknown; six brothers and sisters having preceded him in death; twenty-one nephews and nieces; and many good friends.
Near the close of the Civil War he enlisted in the army, and served until the close of the war. He lived a quiet, unassuming life, was loved by all who knew him well, and respected by all with whom he had
acquaintance. For several years he has been in failing health, but was confined to his bed only two weeks, until he was relieved from his suffering.
Funeral services were held at the residence Wednesday, January 25, at 10 a.m., in charge of Rev. R. N. Montague, pastor of the First M. E. Church, assisted by Rev. J. E. Curry. Music was furnished by Mrs. R. N. Montague and Mrs. M. J. Black. The pall bearers were Riggs Taylor, Charles Vandveer, Dave Vandveer, Frank Mitchell, Charles Redfearn and E. D. Scott. The flowers were cared for by four great nieces of the deceased, Mrs. Irene Edwards, Mrs. Mabel Mitchell, Mrs. Louise McCormick and Miss Cecile Mitchell.
Interment was in East Cemetery.

STAGG, James M.

The venerable J. M. Stagg passed away at his home on South Fayette street about 2 o'clock Tuesday morning after an illness extending over two weeks. His passing was like the running down of machinery that had long been in motion and was just simply worn out. His life was one of purity and good deeds and as an old soldier of the cross and of the Grand Army of the Republic in the days of trials and danger his record is without spot or blemish. He was the soul of honor in all his dealings with his fellow men and left the legacy of honored named to surviving relatives and friends. When the last hour came and the angel of death touched him his last words were "bury me with my Grand Army uniform and tell the boys of the post to attend my funeral." Of all the organizations on earth he cherished the G. A. R. most, and two of its faithful members,
Comrades Arch Norris and Benjamin Mathers were with him when the scenes of earth passed before his mental vision for the last time, and he awoke on the eternal camping ground where the phantom battalions gone before were in waiting to receive and welcome him to that rest that this world can neither give nor take away. It is a consolation for his mourning daughters and only son to know that he is free from pain and sickness and sorrow and the trials of earth that come with old age and the stern battle of life, even unto the end. As he lived he died, loved and respected by all with whom he came in contact in the 80 years of a useful life. He was conscious to the last moment, though suffering intensely and death, with all its terrors, was doubtless a welcome relief, even though it caused the fond hearts to break of those so near and dear to him, but who will some sweet day meet him in the blissful hereafter.
Deceased was born in Cincinnati, O., Dec. 18, 1820, and was thus nearly 80 years of age. In 1838 his father moved to Griggsville, Pike county. In 1850 he was married to Miss Isabella Ingalls, of this city, who died about three years ago. Three daughters and one son survive him, they being Mrs. Mabel Hagadorn, of Chicago, Mrs. Summers, Mrs. Elizabeth Gray, of Griggsville and Miss Archsah Lena and Lawrence Eldon Stagg of this city.
Comrade Stagg was a member of Co. A, 68th Illinois infantry, in the war of the rebellion, having enlisted May 27, 1862. The late John W. King was his captain and Wm. H. Harrison, of this city, was first lieutenant. Among the survivors of his company in this city are George W. Smith, Isaac N. Hicks, S. B. Gray, James S. Hurst, Arthur McKavitt and Charles H. Ayers, of Newport News, Va., all of whom speak well of Comrade Stagg as an earnest, courageous soldier, and always ready when the bugle called for duty, and it called many times before the great war drama came to a close at Appomattox and the banner of the lost cause was forever furled by the legions of gray under their great chieftain, Robert E. Lee, whose star of glory set behind the red billows of war.
The funeral will take place at 2:30 Thursday afternoon at the residence on South Fayette street, Rev. A. B. Morey in charge; and the ritual of the Grand Army will, according to the request of the deceased, be observed at the grave. All members are especially requested to be present and to meet at post hall promptly at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon. Bring your memorial badges. Interment will be in Jacksonville cemetery.
(Oct. 3, 1900)

STEWART, John B.
(Click for Cemetery Reading)

John B. Stewart was born near Jacksonville, Ill.., August 9, 1843, and died at his home in Waverly, Friday, January 31, 1930, aged 86 years, 5 months and 22 days.
At the age of nineteen he enlisted in the Civil war at the old M. E. church in Concord which was used as a recruiting office. He saw three years of active service in Co. B, 101st Illinois Infantry, Third Brigade, Twentieth Chore, and was honorably discharged at Springfield, June 7, 1865.
He was united in marriage to Elizabeth Young, November 8, 1866. To this union ten children were born.
He was preceded in death by his wife and two children.
The children who survive are: D. M., Chas. E., John F., Jesse H., and Lee Otis, of Waverly; Wm. E., of Girard; Mrs. Wm. Howard, of Shipman; and Mrs. Elmer Smith, of Concord. He also leaves three brothers, Stephen G., of Beardstown; Robert L. and George W. of Raymondville, Mo.; besides 43 grandchildren, 22 great grandchildren, and a number of other relatives and friends.
Mr. Stewart was converted at the Braner school house near Arcadia, about 59 years ago, and soon after found a home in Grace Chapel Methodist Protestant church, which was a newly built church, and there he remained a faithful member till death.
About 47 years ago he moved with his family to Missouri, traveling in a covered wagon, but on account of the ill health of his wife, he returned a year later and settled on a farm near Arcadia.
He also lived near Manchester, Ill., and about 17 years ago came to Waverly, where he spent the remainder of his life.
Funeral services were held Monday morning, a short service at the home at 10:30 being followed by services at the First M. E. church at 11 o'clock. Rev. H. C. Munch, pastor of the church, officiated, being assisted by Rev. J. E. Curry. A quartet composed of Miss Eola Pease, Miss Elizabeth Stockdale, Miss Edith Smedley and Mrs. M. J. Black, sang "Going Down the Valley", at the residence, and "Sometime We'll Understand", "No Night There" and "Will the Circle Be Broken", at the church.
The pall bearers were sons of the deceased, D. M., W. E., C. E., J. S., Jesse H. and Lee O. Stewart.
The flowers were cared for by granddaughters: Mrs. Myra Kruse, Mrs. Edna Garse, Miss Ethel Stewart, Miss Ruth Stewart, Mrs. Mabel Stewart and Miss Aileen Stewart.
Burial was in Arcadia cemetery. (Friday, February 7, 1930)


STROISCH, Charles

FOUND DEAD IN BED.
CHAS. STROISCH DIES VERY SUDDENLY.
Was a Resident of Waverly for Over Forty Years and was a Shoemaker by Trade. Dies in His Room at the Waverly Hotel.
Chas. Stroisch, an old and respected resident of the city was found dead in his bed at the Waverly hotel Sunday morning. Mr. Gough went to his room at about seven o'clock to prepare him for breakfast, and found him fully dressed and lying across the bed, dead. Dr. Treble was called and stated that he had evidently been dead for several hours. Mr. Stroisch had been in poor health for some time but had persistently refused the services of a physician. On retiring Saturday night he seemed to be in about as good physical condition as for several days previously. On his person was found a gold watch and chain and $104.75 in money. Some clothing, a revolver and several other articles were found in the room.
Coroner Reynolds was sent for and a jury was summoned. After taking testimony the jury decided that deceased had come to his death by strangulation due to a lung trouble of long standing.
Mr. Stroisch was born in Leipsio, Saxony, Germany, and came to this country in 1857. He had been rather feeble the greater portion of the winter and about two months ago he was taken with a severe attack of the grip which caused his gradual decline in health, with death as a result. Being of a rather peculiar disposition, he would not call the services of a physician nor would he partake of any medicine as he had formed a strong opinion against the use of any narcotics or stimulants and insisted that nature's remedies were sufficient. His every want was carefully looked after and ministered unto, however at the hotel and Mr. and Mrs. Gough gave him every possible attention during his illness as he had lived with them about nine years and they had grown to regard him very highly as a man of excellent character and true purposes. Mr. Stroisch was an exceedingly quiet, unassuming man always minding his own affairs and never was heard to speak a harmful word of anyone; he was a shoemaker by trade and had lived in this city for over forty years; he had never married and had made his home at the Waverly hotel for the past nine years. He was a faithful member of J. W. Ross Post, G. A. R. and served during the war with the old 14th Ill. Regiment.
He is survived by a brother, Ed, who has lived for the past ten years near New Berlin. So far as known he had no other living relatives.
Funeral services were conducted at the Congregational church by the Rev. W. S. Bugbey assisted by the G. A. R. post, and interment was made in East cemetery. Quite a number of relatives and friends were in attendance.

TIFF, William J. (1841-19

William J. Tiff died at the home of his son William F. Tiff of North Main street Monday morning at 3:10 o'clock. Deceased was born July 2, 1841. His parents dying in infancy he was reared by the Rev. Dr. Devore a minister and physician. He lived with the family of the Rev. Devore until he reached the age of eighteen years. Shortly afterward he enlisted in Company K, 101st Ill. Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He was mustered out of service in June 1865. Prior to coming to Jacksonville Mr. Tiff was a member of the Baptist Church and of the G. A. R. He was a man of excellent character, honorable in his dealings with his fellow men and was kind and devoted to his family.
He is survived by one son William F. Tiff, one brother and four grandchildren, Vesta, Ruth, Elbridge and Elaine Tiff.
Funeral services will be held from the residence of William Tiff Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock in charge of the Rev. M. L. Pontius, pastor of Central Christian church. Friends and members of the G. A. R. are invited to attend. Burial will be in Jacksonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Journal, November 22, 1916)

TIMMONS, W. M.

W. M. Timmons Dies at Advanced Age
William Marion Timmons, eldest child of William and Jane Timmons, was born near Spartanburg, South Carolina, September 18, 1837, and departed this life at his home near Waverly, Thursday, April 19, 1928, at the age of 90 years, 7 months and 1 day.
On August 6, 1865, he was united in marriage to Lucinda M. Burns. In early life he was converted and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and attended church regularly as long as his health
permitted.
He was in the Confederate army during the Civil war four years and four months; he was in many battles, and was wounded twice.
After the war he remained near Spartanburg, S. C., until forty years ago, when he moved to this locality and has resided here since that time, except for seven years, which were spent in western Canada.
He is survived by his wife, and nine children; Mrs. A. B. Curtiss, of Meta, Mo.; Mrs. J. W. Sevier, of Casper, Wyo.; Charles A., Ramona, S. D.; Mrs. W. H. Emmons, Saskatchewan, Canada; Mrs. E. E. Hart, Mrs. H. E. Jolly, Otis, John, and Jesse, all of Waverly; besides twenty-seven grandchildren and fourteen great grandchildren.
Funeral services were held at the M. E. Church, South, Saturday morning at 10:30, in charge of the pastor, Rev. W. S. Wright. Music was furnished by Mrs. W. S. Wright, Mrs. Frank Newberry, Miss Elizabeth Foster, and Rev. W. D. Humphrey, who sang "Rock of Ages" and "Abide With Me." The pall bearers were Joseph Bostic, William Givens, James Burns, Walter Burns, Albert Burns and Thomas Burns. The flowers were cared for by Mrs. Everett Marshall, Mrs. Clarence Allen, Mrs. Herman Jolly and Miss Opal Lawrence. Internment was in East Cemetery.
(April 27, 1928)

TODD, Wiley

Wiley Todd, son of Martin Todd, was born near Lynnville, Ill., June 22, 1838. He was one of quite a large family of children of which still surviving are Newton C. Todd of Kansas City, Mo.; James M. Todd of Belton, Mo.; Geo. M. Todd, of Fladada, Tex.; Louiza Anderson of St. Louis; and Anna Baltz of Cleveland, Mo. Mr. Todd lived the greater part of his life in Waverly and vicinity. He lived the past few months at Quincy at which place he died May 25, 1921, at the age of 82 years, 11 months and 3 days. Mr. Todd served his country during the period of the Civil War, and was considered a faithful soldier. He was united in marriage to Lydia Jane Hood in 1867, she preceding him in death a little over a year ago. There were born to this union three sons, Martin I., William H. and Franklin B., the two eldest surviving to mourn the death of their father, as also do other relatives, the brothers, sister, nephews and nieces, besides his many friends in the community in which he lived. Mr. Todd was a member of the M. E. church.
The deceased was a victim of the explosion about fifty years ago that wrecked the Root saw mill. A heavy log fell on his leg and crushed it so that amputation was necessary.
The remains were brought to Waverly, and funeral services held at East cemetery Saturday morning in charge of Rev. J. E. Garrett, pastor of the M.E. Church South.

VAN WINKLE, Alexander (Click for Cemetery Reading)

PIONEER OF COUNTY IS DEAD

ALEXANDER VAN WINKLE ANSWERS FINAL SUMMONS
Was One of Citizens Who Crossed Rockies During the Gold Fever in California, Also Veteran of Civil War - Funeral Will be Held Today.
Alexander Van Winkle, who has been seriously ill at his home in Franklin passed away Tuesday morning at 3 o'clock. He took to his bed about eleven days ago and his condition was considered grave from the very beginning. Mr. Van Winkle was born and reared in Morgan county and was accounted one of her best citizens. He was possessed of the adventurous spirit in his young days and was one of a company of men to cross the mountains to California during the gold fever. When he returned to Illinois he obeyed the call of his country and enlisted in the Civil war, being in a number of important engagements. He was educated in the public schools of Franklin and later graduated from McKendree college in Lebanon, Ill. Not only was he a farmer but for a great many years he followed the occupation of a school teacher in which he was quite successful. Mr. Van Winkle was a staunch Republican and took a great interest in the affairs of his party. For a great many years he was a trustee of the Methodist church of Franklin. His passing away removes from the community a man who was regarded and among the last of the survivors of the early generations of his family. Alexander Van Winkle was born in Morgan county, in 1831; his father, Ransom Van Winkle was born in Kentucky, about 1796; he married in Kentucky, Miss Margaret Brooks, who was also a native of Kentucky. During the autumn of 1829 the family removed to Illinois, and located on Apple Creek, Morgan County, and settled on the unbroken prairie, prepared to cultivate the soil; there were spent the last days of the old folks; this marriage was blessed with nine children: Hiram J., who married Miss Mary Van Meter, he died in 1864; Thomas J., who married Miss Monroe Mayfield; Sarah Jane, married a Mr. Reed of Missouri; James N., who married in California; Martinette who died in 1859, unmarried; Atherton, who married Miss Nellie Luttrell; John H., who married Miss Lizzie Gibson and Alexander, who heads the sketch, married Miss Henrietta Keplinger, a daughter of Samuel Keplinger; three children; Mary H., born Feb. 1864, Homer A., and Horace U., twins, born Dec. 11, 1865; Horace departed this life Dec. 30, 1870, Mrs. Van Winkle departed this life in 1852. Mr. Van Winkle accompanied an expedition en route for the gold fields of California, where he remained for six years, engaged as a miner and stock raiser, returning to Morgan County in 1858; in 1861 he entered the army enlisting in Co. B, 10th Illinois Infantry, and remained encamped at Cairo until the expiration of service; he then re-enlisted, in August 1861 in the 32nd Illinois Infantry; up to February of this year the regiment was stationed at Camp Butler, where Mr. Van Winkle was appointed Sargeant - Major of the regiment; at Shiloh Mr. Van Winkle was seriously wounded, which disabled him for many months. Promoted Adjutant of the regiment, he served in that capacity until his resignation, which occurred in 1864. Mr. Van Winkle was at the siege of Vicksburg, Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge and took quite an active part in the Atlantic campaign. After the war he returned to Morgan county, but shortly went to Wisconsin, where he became a merchant, returning to this county in 1871, he devoted his time principally to the school room and had farm property of 160 acres. There were two children born from the first marriage, Mrs. W. B. Otwell of Carlinville and Homer Van Winkle of Franklin. Mr. Van Winkle was married the second time to Miss Melissa Criswell in 1890 and she died in 1900. He was a brother of the late John Van Winkle of Jacksonville and an uncle of Bert Van Winkle and Chester Van Winkle, formerly of Jacksonville, also an uncle of Charles Van Winkle, cashier of a bank at Palmyra.
The funeral will be conducted at 11 o'clock this morning from the M. E. church in Franklin, in charge of Rev. A. H. Flagge of Assumption, a former pastor in Franklin. Interment will be made in the Franklin cemetery.
The Daily Journal, Jacksonville, Illinois, February 18, 1914


VANWINKLE, John H. - (1844-1901) - Click for CEMETERY READING

John H. VanWinkle, formerly assessor and treasurer of Morgan county, died at his home in this city Friday morning at 11 o'clock, after a lingering illness.
Mr. VanWinkle was born at Franklin, Aug. 8, 1844. At the age of 18 he enlisted in the 32d Illinois volunteers and served with credit until the close of the war. In 1862 he married Elizabeth Gibson, who survives him. Mr. VanWinkle was for many years a farmer and resided in the vicinity of Franklin. From 1888 to 1894 he was postmaster at Franklin and in 1894 he was elected assessor and treasurer of the county. From that time until his death he resided in this city. In 1898 he retired in declining health from the office to which he had been chosen. He is survived by his widow and four children: Charles, Bert, Helen and Chester. Three children are dead. He also leaves a brother, Alex VanWinkle of Franklin, and a sister, Mrs. Sarah J. Reed of this city.
A brief funeral service will be held at the residence at 10 o'clock Sunday, July 7, conducted by Rev. W. H. McGhee.
The services will be concluded about 11:30 o'clock, and the body will be taken to Providence church for interment.
Friends wishing to view the remains may do so after 1 o'clock Saturday.
(Jacksonville Journal, July 6, 1901)

VIEIRA, Joseph J.

Joseph J. Vieira, one of Jacksonville's oldest and best known Portuguese citizens, died at Dr. Day's hospital Friday evening at 7 o'clock. Mr. Vieira had been ill for some time and death resulted from a
complication of diseases.
Deceased was born in the Island of Madeira in December, 1843. He came to this country with his parents in November, 1849, the family coming directly to Jacksonville, where he has since resided.
During the civil war he enlisted in Company G, 101st regiment, in this city. He was severely wounded in the battle of Resaca, Ga., and his whole record in the army was one of bravery and patriotic devotion to duty.
Mr. Vieira was a member of Northminster church and was always active in the work of the church, living his daily life above reproach. He also was a member of the S. P. Ph. And of Matt Star Post, G. A. R. He was united in marriage many years ago to Miss Anna DeFrates, who has been an especially devoted wife. She survives him, and also one brother, Jackson J. Vieira, of this city, and one step-brother, Gregory DeFrates of Virginia.
The funeral will be conducted from Northminster church Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, in charge of the pastor, Rev. Walter E. Spoonts.
(Jacksonville Journal, 17 July 1915)

VIOLET,William (Click for Cemetery Reading)

The death of Wm Violet at his home in Franklin last Wednesday after a few days illness removes from our midst another of our old citizens. Mr. Violet was a man well known and respected. He was a
member of Co. F 129th Ill. Vol. Inf., and soldiered beside our townsman, Mr. J. P. Laws, who now is the only one left of the company residing in this section, and in his last moments Mr. Violet made a request that he act as one of his pall bearers. Funeral services were held in Franklin M.E. church yesterday at 1:30, conducted by Rev. Burton, of Waverly circuit, and interment was made in Franklin cemetery. Quite a number from this city attended the funeral.

WADDELL, Hiram

Hiram Waddell, a former resident of this city, died at his home in Waggoner, Montgomery County, Illinois, Monday, Dec. 5, 1910, aged 79 years. He came to Waverly in 1854, and entered into co-partnership with Lewis Barnard in the carriage and wagon business, and when the War of the Rebellion came on he enlisted in Co. E, 2d Regiment Illinois cavalry, for three years. After being honorably discharged he returned to Waverly and was married to Martha A. Meacham, sister of M. M. and W. D. Meacham, April 20, 1865, who survives him, being now 77 years of age.
Funeral services were held at Waggoner, Tuesday, and the remains were brought to Waverly Wednesday via the C.P. & S.T., arriving here at 4 p.m. and were taken from the station to East cemetery for burial. The pall bearers were Floyd Epling, I. H. Coe, H. I. DeTurk, A. D. Batty, Wm. Malem and Wm. Zoll.

WALKER, Nicholas R.

N. R. Walker Dies Suddenly
Was Found Dead in Bed When Called Wednesday Morning By His Daughter Nellie. Nicholas R. Walker, aged and highly respected citizen of Waverly, died during the night Tuesday, while sleeping. Though not in good health all winter he was as well or slightly better than usual when he retired Tuesday night. It has been customary for him to sleep late each morning, but it was perhaps a little later than usual Wednesday morning when his daughter Nellie called him about 8:15. There was no response and upon investigation Miss Nellie found her father dead. The bed clothes were undisturbed and Mr. Walker evidently passed away while sleeping, with no attending pain. The coroner's inquest was held Wednesday afternoon and the jury returned a verdict of death resulting from cerebral hemorrhage.
Nicholas Rice Walker, youngest son of Samuel and Mary Walker, was born near Monmouth, Ill., October 10, 1842, and departed this life Wednesday, February 4, 1920, at the advanced age of 78 years, 3 months and 24 years. When a small boy his father died, leaving his mother to provide for four children. His mother moved with her family to Alton, Indiana, where the deceased grew to manhood. He entered the employ of an uncle who was a ship builder, and here he learned the carpenter trade which he followed most of his after life. He was with his uncle taking a boat to Ne Orleans when war was declared with the South, their boat was taken by the Confederates and they were sent back to the north by train. On his arrival at home he enlisted in the 23rd Indiana Regiment, serving with it during the war.
At the close of the war he came to Illinois and was married to Mrs. Martha Myler, and they resided on a farm east of Waverly for a time. In 1872 he moved to Waverly, entering the employ of the Hutchison flour Mill.After the death of his wife he went west, resuming the carpenter trade at Wichita, Kansas. Here he was married to Ida Huffman, of that city. They soon returned to Waverly and made their home here until 1905, when the family moved to Hennessey, Okla.
In 1907 they returned to Waverly.
Mr. Walker was a member of the First M. E. church, and of Waverly Lodge No. 118, A. F. & A. M.
He is survived by three sons, Lewis, John, and Samuel, and four daughters, Mary, Nellie, Stella and Helen. His wife and one son, Loy preceded in death.
Funeral services were held at the residence, Thursday, February 5, at 2:30 p.m., in charge of Rev. F. E. Smith, pastor of the First M. E. church. Interment was in East cemetery.
(Feb. 4, 1920)

WALTON, Jonathan W.

BROUGHT TO WAVERLY FOR BURIAL
J. W. Walton, of Springfield, who died at his home Sunday night, March 21, (1920) was buried in East Cemetery in this city Tuesday afternoon of last week. Mr. Walton was 71 years of age, and is survived by his wife, and daughter, Mrs. George Armhrin of Chicago. Mrs. Walton is a sister of Mrs. S. L. Richardson of this city.
(From the cemetery records, I show that Jonathan Walton was born in 1848 and died 21 Mar 1920 @ Springfield, Sangamon County, IL. He was married to Louisa Tongate on 6 Sept. 1877 in Macoupin Co., IL, License #9136. He served in the Civil War as a Private in Co. I, of the 1st Kentucky Infantry.)

WARD, John Keller

John Keller Ward was born the 9th of June, 1846, and died August 19, 1869. His parents dying while he was quite a child, he became a member of the family of Mr. Allen Caruthers.
(From the cemetery records: Born 9 June 1846 in Missouri, died 19 Aug 1869 in Waverly, IL, age 23 Yr 2 Mo 10 Da. He served as a Private in Co. M, 16th IL. Cav.)

WEMPLE, Francis Holland

Funeral Services for F. H. Wemple
Funeral services for F. H. Wemple, whose death was announced in last week's Journal were held Friday morning at ten o'clock at the family residence, Rev. Francis E. Smith, the pastor of the First M. E. church officiating. Miss Ruth Armstrong of Gerlaw sang "Oh Love That Will Not Let Me Go", "He That Dwelleth in the Secret Place of the Most High," and "Abide With Me," with Miss Bess Bradford as accompanist. The pall bearers were William H. Graves, J. F. Kennedy, Anderson Brian, J. C. Deatherage, Fred S. Dennis and John Gray. The honorary bearers were J. M. Harris, J. M. Criswell, Virgil Bishop, John A. Beatty, Chris Roman, John Maginn, Richard Cox and Benjamin Darley. Interment was in East cemetery. Francis Holland Wemple was born near Amsterdam, New York, August 17, 1840. He was the oldest son of Jacob Anthony and Delia Visscher Wemple. In 1841 the family moved to Morgan County, Illinois, where Holland Wemple resided until his death on July 26, 1921. He grew to manhood on the farm and reached his majority about the time of the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion. Together with many of his boyhood friends he volunteered in the 101st Illinois Infantry, with which organization he served until he was invalided home. He was married in 1870 to Mary Ann Carter, and established his home in the house in which he lived without interruption for 51 years. In Waverly he joined first the banking firm of Crain, Manson and Company. He retired from Crain, Manson and Company in 1877 to establish with his younger brother, Edward, the private bank of Wemple Brothers. He was actively identified with the banking and farming interests of the community all his life; in addition he gave during his earlier years much time to the public affairs of Waverly. He was mayor for several terms, and worked actively in making the town dry and keeping it so since 1882. He was for considerable periods a member of the Board of Education, and in 1897 was appointed by Governor Yates a trustee of the Illinois Institution for the Deaf at Jacksonville.
He is survived by three sons, Lester and Wilbur, and by his brother and life-long partner, Edward.
(Aug. 5, 1921)

WHEELER, Joseph B. (Click for Cemetery Inscription)

Joseph B. Wheeler, a well known resident of Murrayville, died Monday morning at 9 o'clock, at the family residence, two miles east of Murrayville at the age of 74 years. His illness had only been of a few day's duration. He was born in the southern part of the state May 5, 1837, and a short time afterwards the family moved to western Missouri. They returned here in 1861 and have always made Morgan county their home. Mr. Wheeler was married to Miss Margaret Fanning September 3, 1863, and they were the parents of six children, three of whom, together with the mother survive: Mrs. Hattie Anderson of St. Louis; Thomas of Capmus, Ill., and Frank, residing at home.
Mr. Wheeler was a veteran of the Civil war, being a member of a Missouri regiment.
The funeral services will be conducted this afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. J. A. Biddle with interment at Nortonville cemetery.
(Jacksonville Courier, July 1911)

WHITLOCK, Alexander Click for Cemetery Reading)

Veteran Laid to Rest.

The funeral of Alexander Whitlock was conducted from the M.E. church Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, in charge of Rev. H. W. Miller and was largely attended. Music was supplied by members of the choir, Mrs. Martin Anderson and Mrs. Curtis Scott singing a duet. Rev. Miller in his remarks paid a tribute to the exemplary life of the deceased and spoke words of comfort to the sorrowing relatives. Members of the Masonic Lodge and Eastern Star Chapter attended the service in a body. Interment was made in the village cemetery. The burial service of the Masons was carried out by members of Wadley Lodge, No. 161, assisted by Chas. Rose, of Jacksonville. The beautiful flora offerings were cared for by Mrs. Mabel Hart, Mrs. Oscar Harmon, Mrs. Arthur Rawlings and Miss Martha Patterson. Six veterans of the Civil war, John W. Luttrell, Richard Cox and John Criswell, of Waverly, John B. Seymour, E. C. Jolly and James Rountree, acted as honorary bearers. The active bearers were six Masons, Walter Read, H. M. Tulpin, Marion Spires, John Bland, James Kennedy and Wm. L. Wells.
Among those who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Dewees and daughters Pearl and Ruby, Mrs. Emma Cully and daughter Elsie and Miss Ella Blackburn, of Ebenezer neighborhood; Edgar Criswell and family and Jas. A. Whitlock and daughter Louise, of Appalonia; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bowyer, Mrs. Will Hughes, Mrs. Eula Skeens, Mrs. Ellsworth Burch and Miss Kathryn Turner, of Waverly; Mrs. Sarah Cox and grandson Willie Oswald, of Cameron, Mo.; Misses Martha Mason and Mayme and Sayde Murphy of Jacksonville.
Alexander Whitlock, the son of John and Rebecca Whitlock, was born in Washington county, Tenn., June 10, 1840, and died at the family home here Thursday morning at 9:30 o'clock, at the age of 79 years and 16 days.
In 1852 he removed with his parents to Illinois and settled near Waverly, but for the past 35 years he has made his home in Franklin. At an early age he was converted under the ministry of Rev. Wingate Newman and united with the Little York M.E. church, being an active worker in that organization. He removed his membership to Franklin M.E. church after becoming a resident of this place. At the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted with Co. I, 14th Illinois Infantry, lacking but a few days of being 21 years of age, his company being mustered into service the day he reached his majority. After being in service for a short time in Missouri he became ill, but after regaining his health he again enlisted in Co. G, of the 101st Infantry, and served on the Vicksburg campaign, running the blockade on the gunboat Lafayette. He received an honorable discharge Oct. 30, 1863, after taking ill for the second time. On June 15, 1865, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary C. Bowyer. To this union were born ten children, four of whom survive: They are William T., of Concord; Jesse M., of Heber Springs, Ark.; James O. and Miss Bertha at home. Mr. Whitlock was a member of the Masonic fraternity and was ever faithful to the teachings of that order. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, three sons, one daughter, twelve grandchildren and six great- grandchildren. He also leaves the following sisters and brothers: Mrs. Eva Gotschall and Mrs. Geo. Bonds, and John Whitlock, of this place, and Geo. Whitlock, of Downing, Mo., besides a host of other relatives and friends.
(July 1919)


WHITLOCK, John W. (Click for Cemetery Reading)

ANOTHER OLD VETERAN CROSSES THE DIVIDE
John W. Whitlock, long a resident of Franklin, and a veteran of the civil war died at his home here Thursday afternoon. He had been ill with the pneumonia and heart failure was the immediate cause of his
demise.
Mr. Whitlock was born near Fall Branch, Tennessee, on July 4th, 1844, being 77 years, 7 months and 5 days old. At six years he came to Morgan county with his parents who located at Waverly where he was living at the outbreak of the civil war. He enlisted in Co. C, 101st Illinois Infantry, and served three years, three months and some days receiving an honorable discharge.
He was a farmer for several years, moving to Franklin 27 years ago. He had been in failing health for nine years, being a patient sufferer and meeting all misfortunes and pain with an ever kindly smile. He is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Eva Gotschall and Mrs. Geo. Bonds, of this place, and one brother, George Whitlock of Downing, Mo., together with many other relatives and a host of friends.
Funeral services were conducted from the residence Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. H. A. Sherman, pastor of the M. E. church. Music was furnished by Mrs. M. L. Anderson, Mrs. Curtis Scott, H. A. Sherman and A. G. Cody, Miss May Boulware acting as accompanist. The flowers were care for by Miss Bertha Whitlock, Mrs. Nettie Bullard, Mrs. Maud Lowery and Mrs. Viola Phillips.
Interment was made in the village cemetery. The bearers were M. B. Keplinger, L. A. Caldwell, George H. Jolly, George Schaaf, Wm. Whalen and J. O. Rolston. Four old veterans, James Rountry, John
B. Seymour, E. Jolly and John M. Criswell, served as honorary bearers.
Among those from out of town attending the funeral were Mrs. James Kiel, Mrs. Sarah Hopper and Bert Bonds and family, of Virden, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Taylor and Miss Anna Barnes, of Springfield, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Phillips and Mrs. Elmer Lowery, of Loami, Mrs. Earl Phillips, of Beardstown, and Mrs. Jos.
Bullard, of Waverly.
(The Franklin Times - Feb. 16, 1922)

WINGLER, John (Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPTION)

John Wingler, one of the oldest residents of Morgan county, passed away at the home of his son, Frank, six miles northeast of the city at 1 o'clock a.m., Feb. 8th, at the ripe age of 93 years, 2 months and 7 days. Perhaps he was the last survivor of the county of the Mexican war. He was a veteran also of the Civil War. John Wingler was born Dec. 1st , 1824, at Shippensburg, Penn. He was reared on the farm and followed that occupation all his long life with the exception of the enlistment in his country's service during the Mexican war in 1845 to '47, and in 1861 in Co. B, 54th Vol. Inf. Ohio, when he served three and a half years and was discharged because of ill health at the beginning of Sherman's march to the sea. He was in a number of the great battles in the Mississippi Valley, Chattanooga, and Atlanta. After returning home from Mexico he immigrated to Camden, Ohio, where he married Miss Nancy Odaffer. To this union five children were born, two girls and three boys. One, John, died in infancy. After the Civil war the family moved to Indiana, where they remained a few years and in 1871 came to the vicinity of Jacksonville. The wife and mother died in 1888 and a few years later the two daughters died within a month of each other. For seventeen years he has made his home with his son Frank and wife where he has received every care love could bestow upon him in his declining years. Many years ago he professed his faith in Christ and united with the Christian Church at Antioch, retaining his membership until his death. In his declining years his faith grew stronger and he desired to go to that better home above.
He leaves his son, George of the city and Frank, also fourteen grandchildren and thirteen great grandchildren.
The funeral services were held at Antioch church east of the city Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. G. T. Wetzel, and laid to rest in the beautiful cemetery beside his wife and children. A large circle of friends and neighbors being present.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal - dtd. 13 Feb 1918)

WOOD, John Click for CEMETERY INSCRIPTION)

JOHN WOOD DIES MONDAY AT AGE OF EIGHTY-FIVE
Civil War Veteran Passes Away at Home on Mound Avenue - Funeral to Be at Hartland Church. Another Morgan county Civil War veteran answered final taps today, with the passing of John Wood at the family residence, 1800 Mound avenue. Mr. Wood died at 8:20 o'clock after a short illness caused by pneumonia. His condition did not become serious until last Friday.
Mr. Wood was born in Jacksonville oct. 21, 1842, spent the greater part of his life on a farm in the Hartland community in the south part of the county, and returned to this city twenty-two years ago to make his home. He was united in marriage in 1871 with Miss jane Hughes of the Hartland neighborhood. Five children were born to this union, the wife and four children preceding him in death, two in infancy, Hattie, at the age of 17, and Eugene Wood, who passed away March 23, 1925. Mrs. Wood died in 1894.
Mr. Wood was later united in marriage with Mary Ellen Hilton of Jacksonville, and they were the parents of five children. Mr. Wood is survived by his wife and six children, Mrs. Thomas Allen, Portland, Ore., Mrs. Wilbur Fanning, Walter J. Wood, Herschel E. Wood, Mrs. Charles Anders and Lester Wood, all of Jacksonville.
On August 15, 1862, at the age of 18 years, Mr. Wood enlisted in the Union Army, and served until his honorable discharge on June 7, 1865.
He was a member of the Hartland Baptist church. The remains were removed to the Arthur G. Cody funeral Home and prepared for burial. Services will be held at the Hartland Baptist church at a time to be announced later.
(Jacksonville Journal, dtd. 14 Nov. 1927)

WOODMANSEE, John Fletcher (Click for Cemetery Inscription)

Mr. J.F. Woodmansee Passes Away
J. F. Woodmanse, aged 69 years, a retired merchant and one of the best know residents of Morgan county, died at 9:30 o'clock Sunday evening, Sept. 25th, at his home here, of Bright's disease, after an illness lasting two and a half years.
John Fletcher Woodmanse, only son of Asa and Elizabeth Woodmansee, was born December 24th, 1835, in Butler county, Ohio. While in his infancy, he moved with his parents to Drake county, Ohio, where he lived until manhood. In 1850 his father died and his mother followed in 1891. He attended the village public schools for several years, and later he attended White River College and Institute at Richmond, Ind., and was graduated. It was while here that he was converted and united with the M. E. church, where he remained a faithful member.
In 1856 he came to Illinois and located near Palmyra, where he taught school for two years. In 1858 he was married to Mildred M. Seymour, of near Franklin. To this union were born six children, Wallace L. (died in 1898), Ella A., Robert E., Harry W., Effie D., and Daisy Alma, (died in 1872.)
When the call for volunteers in the civil war was made he was among the first to respond to the call, and served as sergeant in Co. B, One Hundred and Twenty-second Ill. Vols. Under Gen. John Rinaker, until the close of the war when he received his honorable discharge.
Shortly after marriage he engaged in the dry goods and clothing business in Scottville, Ill., where he remained until 1867, when he moved to Waverly and engaged in the milling business, and later in the dry goods business, retiring in 1891 on account of failing health. His beloved wife passed away in 1873, and in 1874 he was married to Mary A. Givens, of near Waverly, and to this union two children were born, Fletcher A. (died in 1878), and Wm. A. In June, 1902 he was taken sick and in April 1903 he was confined to his bed, where he remained until his death, Sept. 25th, 1904. Mr. Woodmansee had been bedfast for many months, and many times his condition was considered critical. He rallied time and again and by the strength of his constitution prolonged the end. By his death Waverly loses one of its oldest and best known residents, and one who was always ready and willing to lend a hand for the support of the gospel, and for the alleviation of sorrow and suffering whenever the opportunity was presented. The decedent is survived by his wife Mrs. Mary A. Woodmansee, three sons, Robert E., of Springfield; H. W., of Peoria; W. A., of St. Louis; two daughters, Mrs. J. H. Morse, of Los Angeles, Cal., and Mrs. Fred S. Dennis, of Waverly.
The funeral services were conducted from the M. E. church, in this city, (of which he was an active member), and were conducted by Rev. C. M. Barton assisted by Rev. T. H. Agnew. A large number of friends and relatives were in attendance, and quite a number accompanied the remains to their last resting place in Providence cemetery, west of Franklin, where the I. O. O. F. lodge, of this place, took charge and conducted the services at the grave. The pall bearers were composed of two brothers from each of the three orders to which he belonged, the Odd Fellows, Masons and G. A. R.'s, for which he always had a high regard.

WRAY, M. K.

M. K. Wray passed away at the family residence, 366 Sharp street, Thursday evening at 8 o'clock, after an illness of long duration. Mr. Wray was born in Anderson, Ind., in 1832, and was married to Jemimah Oldridge in 1866 at Onargo, Ill. To this union there were born four children, of which the surviving three are Mrs. H. C. Breckenridge, Chicago; Mrs. H. L. Wagner, Rockford, Ill., and Miss Chloe Wray, at home. Mrs. Wray and one child preceded him in death, the wife passing away in 1876. Mr Wray was a member of Co. B, 113th Ill. Volunteers, seeing three years' service in the war of the rebellion. He came to Jacksonville thirty-three years ago and has lived a life of unvarying devotion to family and friends. The funeral will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the undertaking parlors of Williamson & Cody. Further arrangements will be made known today.
(Jacksonville Daily Journal, Friday Morning, March 23, 1917)

WRIGHT, John W. Click for Cemetery Reading)

Killed With Furlough In His Pocket
Anything can happen in the war, and usually does. But who ever heard of a soldier being killedfighting in the front lines with a furlough home in his hip pocket?
It probably never happened before and perhaps never will again but in the battle of Peach Tree Creek, Ga., 100 years ago tomorrow, Private John W. Wright of Co. H, 101st Illinois Infantry, was carrying a furlough home to "Franklin when a Confederate rifle ball killed him instantly.
He was the son of "Col. Jack" and "Aunt Pol" Wright, who kept the tavern and stage coach station in Franklin for many years.
A Military Family
John P. Wright won his title as a colonel in the Illinois militia. His father served in the Revolutionary war for seven years and was one of that zany and fearless group led by Mad Anthony Wayne
that captured the British fort at Stony Point, N.Y., in 1779. They took the stronghold at night, with bayoneted, but unloaded muskets.
In 1800 the family joined the westward trek through the Cumberland Gap and settled in Kentucky.
In 1829 the entire family moved to Franklin precinct, Morgan county.
John W. Wright and his brother, William S., enlisted in the Franklin company raised in August, 1862, by Capt. Joab M. Fanning. William S. was elected First lieutenant of Co. H.
Dies In Franklin
While training at the Morgan county fairgrounds William S. contracted typhoid fever and he died in Franklin Oct. 6, 1862, the very day that the regiment left Jacksonville for Cairo and active service. "Col. Jack" contracted the disease and died three days later. "Aunt Pol" was a distressed and lonely woman as she tried to carry on the tavern by herself. She wrote often to her son and to her special friend,
Chaplain James B. Seymour of Hart's Prairie. During the summer and early fall of 1864 every Illinois chaplain was granted a furlough home.
Things didn't look too good for the Union cause and especially for the Republican cause. Chaplain Seymour was a Democrat, but he was also a 100% Union man and his presence in Morgan county served to bolster the candidacy of the Union commander-in-chief.
In Front Of Atlanta
Chaplain Seymour asked for a furlough for Private Wright so he could go home to see his mother.
It was slow moving through channels and the chaplain was already on his way to Illinois when Wright's furlough came to the regiment in camp just south of Peach Tree Creek, about five miles north of Atlanta. Eight companies were resting in camp, with Co. E, Jacksonville, and Co. F, Murrayville, on the scrimmage line. They were hit hard in the surprise rebel attack. Private Wright was shaking hands and saying farewell to his comrades when the gunfire to the south told of the attack. A courier came riding in to order the regiment to the front "on the double-quick". Wright put his furlough in his pocket, grabbed his musket and yelled, "Wait for me, boys, I'm coming along."
Returned to Franklin
After the rebels were driven back to their fortified lines in front of Atlanta the Morgan county boys buried Private Wright and carefully marked the grave. When the war was over a cousin, James B. Wright,
went to Georgia and returned the body to Franklin, where it was buried next to his brother in Franklin cemetery.
The Enfield rifled musket carried by Private Wright had a walnut stock of unusual grain and beauty. Corporal Archibald Norris of Co. D, Jacksonville, picked it up on the battlefield and carried it throughout
the remainder of the war.
(Cecil Tendick, Journal Courier, Jacksonville, Ill., July 19, 1964)

WRIGHT. W. C. (Click for Cemetery Reading)

Another of the brave men whom Morgan county contributed to the service of the country has answered the final roll call and gone to his reward. W. C. Wright, whom almost everyone knew as "Shelt", passed away at an early hour Saturday morning. He had been in poor health for a number of years and for nine weeks had not been able to sit up. Death was due to hardening of the arteries. Mr. Wright was the son of Thomas and Jane D. Wright, who were early immigrants to this county from Kentucky, the state that has furnished so many grand men and women to the land. "Uncle Tom" and "Aunt Jane" Wright were known far and near and highly respected for their many good qualities. They were people of sturdy character and reared a family to do them credit. Their son, William Chilton, was born near Waverly, April 28, 1840, and was one of seven children, James B., William O., Walter Shelby, Mrs. Fannie Graves, Mrs. Mary Ella Seymour, Mrs. Lou Sevier and Mrs. Sarah Allbright. The first four are dead; Mrs. Seymour and Mrs. Sevier live in this county and Mrs. Allbright in St. Joseph, Mo. In August, 1862, Mr. Wright enlisted in Co. B 101st Illinois Infantry, and saw hard service from the start. He was on one of the blockade runners that passed Vicksburg and was all through the memorable siege of the rebel stronghold. He was in Sherman's March to the sea and saw hard service previous to that time and all who were with him testify top his unflinching bravery. Among the surviving comrades is Judge T.B. Orear, who says Mr. Wright was a peculiarly brave and efficient soldier. July 20, 1864 he was wounded at Peach Tree Creek, a part of his left hand being shot away, causing him to come home on a furlough but he returned just as soon as possible. He served on till discharged honorably from a service he had honored. None were braver than he and none bore a better reputation as a soldier.
On his return from the war he settled in Jacksonville and for years followed dealing in livestock and handled thousands of animals. In politics he was a Democrat and was prominent in the counsels of his party and was useful to it in many ways. He was sheriff from 1882 till '86, serving the first term under the four years law. He also served a number of terms as alderman. Jan. 25, 1872, he was married to Miss Mary Menick at the residence of Mr. And Mrs. T. Rice Smith and as the event took place on Mrs. Smith's birthday the day was celebrated at one home or another till death took Mr. Smith away. Mr. And Mrs. Wright were always much devoted to each other and lived happily. They were not the parents of any children. His wife survives him.
He was a member of Urania Lodge No. 243, I.O.O.F., and of Matt Starr post 348, G.A.R.
During the Billy Sunday meetings he was converted and remained true to his profession. He united with State Street church and was a consistent member as long as he lived.
A brief funeral service will be conducted at his late residence, 211 S. Fayette Street, by Dr. A.B. Morey, a long time friend and pastor, at 4 p.m. today, and Monday morning the remains will be taken to Franklin, where Dr. Morey will conduct another service at 9 o'clock in the Methodist church and intermentwill be in the Franklin cemetery.
Jacksonville Daily Journal, Jacksonville, Illinois, June 30, 1912

WYATT, William J. (Click for Cemetery Reading)

Prominent Morgan County Citizen Dead.
Colonel William J. Wyatt, one of the oldest, if not the oldest, native born residents of Morgan county and a veteran of two wars, passed away at his home in Franklin Friday evening at 8 o'clock, at the age of 87 years. Colonel Wyatt had been in failing health all summer but until about a week ago was able to be up and around. At that time, however, he was taken to his bed and gradually weakened until the end, and death is attributed to paralysis of the neck and throat and ailments incident to old age. William J. Wyatt was born on a farm five miles southeast of Jacksonville, October 28, 1825, and was a son of John and Rebecca Wyatt, who came to Illinois from Missouri. Mr. Wyatt was a farmer and stock raiser and an old line Democrat, having served two terms in the Illinois state legislature when the state capital was located at Vandalia. He held a commission as lieutenant during the Black Hawk war and died January 6, 1849. His wife passed away in August, 1866. Colonel Wyatt, who spent practically his entire life in this county, obtained his education in the subscription schools of the county, but was compelled to remain at home and mange his father's farm, as he was away from home a great deal of the time looking after his stock interests. On October 29, 1848, Colonel Wyatt was married to Mrs. Eliza A. Williams, who died February 12, 1892. The colonel was also preceded in death by a son and daughter. He was married a second time to Sarah Dodd of Waverly, a daughter of Elijah Dodd, who with one son, George H. Wyatt of this county, survive. Colonel Wyatt was a member of Hicks lodge No. 93, of Waverly, and on April 8, 1853, he became a charter member of Franklin lodge No. 121, I. O. O. F. He was actively interested in assisting to promote several public service enterprises, among them being the Jacksonville, Louisville and St. Louis railroad, which was built mainly by M. P. Ayers, now deceased. Mr. Wyatt secured a vote for the issue of bonds along the route for the construction of this road.
He was a member of the Methodist church.
Colonel Wyatt had a record for war service that is equaled by few in this community. Under Governor Ford, in 1845-46 he served in the state militia which was detailed to keep peace among the Mormons and anti-Mormon elements in Carthage, serving as a first lieutenant of a mounted infantry and remaining in winter quarters in that city. With consent of his father he left home on March 14, 1846 and on the thirtieth of the following May he enlisted in Company G of the regiment commanded by Colonel John J. Harden for service in the Mexican war. This regiment enjoyed the distinction of being the first of any kind ever organized in Illinois for a national war. Mr. Wyatt was elected captain of his company and early in June the regiment was mustered in at Alton. The destination of the regiment was thought to be Chihuahua, but they were ordered to Monclovia and after five weeks went to Parras, where General John B. Wool, in command of that division of the army, received orders from General Taylor to march on to Buena Vista Pass and meet the Mexican army under Santa Anna. At this historic battle, in which the Americans overcame overwhelming odds, Col. Wyatt and his company took an active part. They were in the right wing of the American troops and supported Captain Washington's battery to the pass, the key to the battle ground and although the Americans' loss in killed and wounded was heavy, not a man under Colonel Wyatt was lost. In the number of killed were eleven commissioned officers of the American army, four of whom were colonels, among the Colonel Hardin. Colonel Wyatt, who was an intimate friend, in company with his orderly sergeant and others, brought in the lifeless remains from the battlefield and the body first found resting place on Mexican soil but when the service was over the remains were brought to Jacksonville and buried in the Jacksonville cemetery. In 1847 Colonel Wyatt was honorably discharged at Camargo, Mexico, and returned to this county, making the trip by way of the Gulf of Mexico and New Orleans. He engaged in the cattle business, but when the Civil War broke out he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel of the 101st regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry by Governor Yates. This regiment was in command of Colonel Fox and when the men arrived at Cairo, Colonel Wyatt became ill but he remained with his command. He was taken a prisoner by the Confederates at Holly Springs, Miss., while ill there and was taken to Benton Barracks with a number of paroled prisoners and placed in charge of them. On account of physical disability he was honorably discharged from the service in May, 1863. -
Jacksonville Journal.

Col. Wyatt was initiated into Waverly lodge No. 93, I. O. O. F. Oct. 22, 1851. Funeral services were conducted from the family residence in Franklin Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of Rev. A. H. Flagge of Assumption, assisted by Rev. Peter Kittle, pastor of the M. E. church of Franklin. Interment was in Franklin cemetery, and the services at the grave were conducted by the Franklin lodge of Odd Fellows.
Waverly Journal, Waverly, Illinois, Oct. 25, 1912






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