1894 Plat Book of Morgan County Illinois






1894 Plat Book of Morgan County Illinois
"Statistics of the Population of Morgan County By Townships, With Abstract of Agricultural Productions"






Julius B. Peck was born in Sharon, Litchfield county, Connecticut. He settled, with his uncle, Azor Ruggles, in Camfield, Trumbull county, Ohio, where he remained till 1822, when he returned to the place of his nativity, and remained there about thirteen years. In the spring of 1835 he settled on the farm where he now resides, one mile south of the village of Waverly. Mr. Peck has followed farming for a business. He is energetic and orderly, and believes that it pays to do farming well. He has contributed his share in making Morgan county one of the best improved in the state. He was married January 21, 1851, to Miss Mary Jane, daughter of Light Samples, one of the old settlers - by which union he has had nine children, three only of whom are now living, viz: Harriet Malenda, Lilly May, and Josephine G., all with their parents. The others died in infancy. Judge Peck, as he is widely known, is an upright citizen and reliable business man.

Samuel Poole was born in Bedfordshire, England, April 2, 1822. He emigrated to this country and settled in Philadelphia, where he engaged largely in the milk trade, and afterwards successfully in the ice trade. He was a partner in the Fairmount Glass Works for about one and a half years. In 1852 he came west and located in Morgan county, and two years after settled in the place where he has since resided. Mr. Poole was among the first of our citizens who engaged in business at Pike's Peak, where he was quite successful in the provision trade. He returned and bought the farm, southwest of Bethel, where he now resides. He was married to his present wife, Mrs. Samantha Wallace, November 27, 1858. His children are Ann, James, George T., and Delany, and are at home with their parents. Mr. P. was first married to Mrs. Elizabeth Owens, of Pennsylvania, February 22, 1848. By this marriage he had one son, William Benjamin. He was married to his second wife, Mary Knight, of Bedfordshire, December 12, 1853. Only one of his two children by this marriage is living, viz: Mary, who lives with her father. His present wife has four children living; Robert, Richard, Warren and Armina Wallace. Mr. P. has made several visits to England. He is a good example of a refined intelligent gentleman.

William Post, Esq., son of Jas. Post, was born in Warwick, Orange County, New York, January 27, 1802. He removed to Elmira, New York, where he was married, September 15, 1827, to Miss Phoebe, half-sister of the late Mary McConnel, of Jacksonville. He moved to Morgan county, and settled in Jacksonville in June, 1835, and the next spring he settled on the southwest of section 15, township 16, range 12, where he now resides. 'Squire Post has still living by his first wife, Harriet, born July 26, 1830, former wife of Dr. Brown, who is now residing in Cass County, Missouri; Mary Ann, born May 28, 1832, wife of Dr. L. H. Calloway, of Barry, Pike County, Illinois; Ellen, born July 4, 1834, died July 26, 1834; Esther, born September 4, 1838, wife of Perry Craig, of Pleasant Hill, Missouri; Marilla, born March 4, 1841, wife of George Elliott, residing in Mason county; John M., born April 19, 1844, now a citizen of the county. His wife died September 30, 1853. He was again married, August 11, 1859, to Mrs. Elizabeth, widow of the late Jas. McGee, an early citizen of the county. Mrs. Post is the oldest daughter of the late Elijah Evans, who was also one of the early settlers. 'Squire Post is a man possessing many sterling qualities. He is calculated to exert a great influence in society by his good judgment and love of justice. As evidence of the fact, we would remark, that he has been an acting justice of the peace for thirty-three years in Morgan county, an honor which can hardly be claimed by any other citizen of the county. His bodily health and mental endowments are good, and may he continue an ornament and blessing to the community and county in which he has so long been a public man and citizen.

Benjamin F. Price was born in Ripley, Brown county, Ohio, July 1, 1830. He emigrated with his father, Abraham, who settled in Bethel in the fall of 1834. He was married February 14, 1864, to Miss Julia A., oldest daughter of Hon. Edward Lusk, of Meredosia. He enlisted, before his marriage, in the 10th Illinois Infantry when that regiment was first organized, serving until the regiment was disbanded, July 18, 1865, being quartermaster at that time, and participating in the conflicts of the regiment during the war. He followed farming about three years after his return, when he engaged in the sale of drugs, at Versailles, Illinois, continuing in the business about one year and a half. He then engaged in the manufacture of lumber in Meredosia, and still follows the same business. He is a gentleman of very fine talents, which for several years he has employed as a correspondent of the press. He is noted for his energy and esteemed for his many virtues.

Benjamin Pyatt, Esq., sheriff of Morgan county, is a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and was born in the city of Pittsburg, May 20, 1820. He is the fifth child of Benjamin and Margaret Pyatt. Benjamin followed the occupation of carpenter and builder. The ancestors of Mr. Pyatt were French; his wife was of Irish extraction. In 1836 he emigrated from Pittsburg to Missouri, locating in Marion county, where he resided till 1848. He then moved to Jacksonville, Illinois, where he spent the residue of his life. His death occurred March 17, 1866, at the advanced age of eighty-four years. Mrs. Pyatt survived his death till August 5, 1871, dying at the age of eighty-two years. Benjamin Pyatt, Jr., received his early education in the schools of Pittsburg, attaining a solid education for those times. When about the age of eighteen, he became an apprentice to the cigar and tobacco business. He moved to Missouri with his parents, at the above-stated time, and from 1841 till the spring of 1843, he carried on cigar making, at Palmyra, Missouri, and there became acquainted with Miss Mary A. Leer, to whom he was married March 28, 1842. She is the daughter of John and Catharine Leer, formerly of Paris, Kentucky. Mr. Pyatt and wife had a family of eight children, five of whom are still living; one son and one daughter are married. Mr. Pyatt has given his children the advantages of a good business education. In February, 1843, he removed with his family to Jacksonville, where he has since carried on the tobacco business quite largely, and has been successful in making it a lucrative enterprise. The firm is now known as B. Pyatt & Son. It is said to be the largest tobacco house in this portion of the state, and now, after a period of about thirty years, it is in its most flourishing condition. At one time, this firm employed twenty-two hands in the manufacturing department. Mr. Pyatt made his start in life with ninety-five cents in money, and an abundance of energy, coming, as he did, to Missouri when it was almost in its primitive state; and of course, he had many hardships to endure. In November, 1870, Mr. Pyatt was elected sheriff of Morgan county, by a large majority, and is the present incumbent. In early life, Mr. Pyatt became a member of the democratic party and has always advocated its principles. His first vote was given in the interests of that party, though he now expects to take a new departure for Horace Greeley; and on the expiration of his official term he intends to resume his former business. As a politician, he has always been active and efficient. Mr. Pyatt and family are members of the Christian church. He is a prominent and influential member of the order of the "mystic tie". His life has been one of earnest, hard work.





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